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5

It implies that I had been thinking today is a good day, until I noticed that it would snow soon. 还 means 本来 here, it indicates a continuation of original thought. For no. 3, I wouldn't say it's wrong, but it sounds very Chinglish to me. It couldn't be "also", because 快下雪 means bad weather, which is opposite to good weather.


4

Yes, definitely you can. However, in some situations, with 吗 it sounds more natural and less rude. And sometimes, with 吗 it might sound less criticizing, such as your first example 今天是我的生日,难道你不知道吗?


3

This is a common pattern used for emphasizing that something "hasn't even been...": v + 都没有 + v 动都没有动 = hasn't even been touched 看都没有看 = hasn't even been looked at 翻都没有翻 = hasn't even been flipped through


3

A:听说你去丽江玩儿了?那儿怎么样? B:那里特别美,空气也很新鲜。 From the context, we can deduce that B is currently not in 丽江 because B replies 那里特别美. If B is still there, he/she would say 这里特别美. However, 听说你去丽江玩儿了 could be interpreted either way you suggested. The sentence only tells you have gone to/arrived 丽江, but it doesn't tell you are currently out or not. Additional ...


3

Both 你去了北京吗 and 你去北京了吗 are possible in practice, but they are used in different situations. 你去了北京吗 is used when you try to confirm the fact that someone really went to Beijing. Let's say you have two friends, Friend A and B. A told you that B has gone to Beijing last week. However, this information surprised you because you didn't expect B would go to ...


2

"制冷" is not a verb. Note that your dictionary link that is showing calls it a noun (small "n."). It means "refrigeration", as in the power to refrigerate, not "to refrigerate" (v.). Hence it is invalid to insert it into the verb slot of the structure you are trying to use. But, in fact, this actually leads the way to writing this sentence with proper ...


2

"在" has at least two functions. First "在" can be used to imply something is happening, for example, "我在学习(I am studying)", and in this case it comes before the verb. The verb doesn't have to be about physical movement. Second you can use 在 as a preposition, implying the place where something happened/is happening/will be happening. For example, "我现在住在上海(...


2

Totally agree with Dan's answer. To answer your edited question: Why is 你去了北京吗 less common than 你去北京了吗? It's Baidu's algorithm problem - probably wrong. If you search the same on Google, the results are pretty similar. ;)


2

Let's begin with 什么都 meaning "everything"; see Expressing "everything" with "shenme dou" at the Chinese Grammar Wiki. We can add a verb or an adjective afterwards: 什么都 + adjective 什么都美丽 (everything is beautiful) 什么都辣 (everything is spicy) 什么都简单 (everything is simple) which we negate with 不: 什么都不美丽 (everything is not beautiful) 什么都不辣 (...


2

I think it's OK with or without 了 因为我喜欢读中文书,所以我开始了自学汉语。 因为我喜欢读中文书,所以我开始自学汉语。 The problem, as I see it, is: How can you know you like to read Chinese books before you have studied Chinese?? You cannot have read any! Kind of grates on logic! 为了能够看懂中文,我开始了自学汉语。 In order to be able to read Chinese, I began to study the Chinese language.


2

我的包裹发到了南京,但是我人在北京,一个完全相反的「京」! 我的包裹发到了南京,但是我人在北京,怎么没发到东京? 我人在北京,但是我的包裹却偏偏背道而驰,跑到南京去了! 我人在北京,但是我的包裹却和我渐行渐远,往南京去了!


2

I think in this case 还 doesn't indicate the continuation or in addion to. It denotes this sense defined in dictionaries: (表示对某件事物没想到如此, 而居然如此)(something goes unlike one's original thought): He really is resourceful. 他还真有办法。 So, 快下雪了,我还以为今天是好天气 The sentence is saying that my original thought was today would be good weather, but now it will ...


1

Most likely, I'd say 他们请经理吃饭了 or 他们请经理吃了饭 in practice. 他们请了经理吃饭 might be ok, but it doesn't look a normal word order. Usually, we just say: 他们请了经理 meaning they invited the manager. What that invitation is for is often implied(assuming it can be figured out from the context). This is probably just me. Others might take different opinions.


1

他们请经理吃了饭- subtle emphasize what they eat, but not necessarily. 他们请了经理吃饭- to emphasize who they buy dinner for There's another possible way to say this: 他们请经理吃饭了- subtle emphasis on the thing happened, but not necessarily. It really depends on how you say it, your tune can change the emphasis too. They all have the same meaning. The second one probably ...


1

My package went to Nanjing, but I'm in Beijing; that's the complete opposite Jing. 我的包裹去了南京,但我在北京,这是两个完全反方向的京!


1

Your translation is accurate, but the point is that the original joke isn't funny, thus making the translation strange. Advice 1: Better not state both 北京 & 南京. 快递投给了南京,跟我在的京城反了个边。 Advice 2: Better not play on 南 & 北. 我人在北京,快递给发了南京,真是中南海的文件发了总统府。


1

In speech, you can say: 我人在'北'京,快递却发到了'南'京. It would add some joking effect when you put a bit emphasis on 北 and 南. You don't have to say they are opposite literally. Your audience would seize that from your tone, which is the whole point of the joke.


1

It is a [topic + comment/ opinion] grammar structure 晚饭 (dinner) is a topic 妈妈做了面条给我们吃。(mother made noodle for us to eat) is a comment The comment here is a basic [Subject +V + object] You can replace the topic, e.g. Change 晚饭 to 午餐 and write "午餐妈妈做了面条" = "(for) lunch, mom made noodle" You can replace the comment, e.g. Change 面条 to 饺子 and "晚饭妈妈做了饺子" = "...


1

Try to write short, simple questions. You will get clearer answers. It is important to know where things are. Chinese often locates things like this: 在雕塑前面 in front of the statue 在桌子上 on the table 在盒子里 in the box 在城墙后边 behind the city wall [ ] = where or whereto This [where or whereto] is a location in space. 我把花放[在雕塑前面]。I put flowers [in front of the ...


1

In general, 不 means "no" or "not" while 没 stands for 没有 and is closer to "don't" or "don't have". So 他什么都不吃 means something like "he does not eat anything", while 他什么都没吃 means "he didn't eat anything". So in this case, 不 conveys the meaning that something is universally not true (e.g. he is someone who just does not eat anything, or at least during a ...


1

As said in another answer: 会 means you have the knowledge necessary to do something 能 means you have the ability/permission to do something 可以 means you have permission to do something. However, I think there's something missing from the answer when you regard these in terms of intent. In certain cases of using 会, you can be emphasizing that ...


1

For some cases, 能 and 会 doesn't have too much difference, for example, 我能写字 and 我会写字。 However, in some examples, 能 and 会 can mean different implications. For example, 我能去 vs 我会去. and this is how I interpret it: 我能去 means you can go, but you don't have to go. Similar for 可以. 会 means you can go and you will go.


1

This has been covered on nearly every Chinese learning platform and is one of the first problems learners encounter. Without being too mean I do have to ask, what amount of prior research have you done? 会 means you have the knowledge necessary to do something 能 means you have the ability to do something (nothing preventing you from doing it) lastly 可以 ...


1

"今天是我的生日,难道你不知道吗?" (Today is my birthday, could it be you don't know that?) is a rhetorical question Omitting "吗" and write "今天是我的生日,难道你不知道?" or "难道你不知道今天是我的生日?" is still perfectly acceptable as a rhetorical question, as long as there's a question mark at the end. Even without "难道" , "今天是我的生日,你不知道吗?" can still be a rhetorical question if you are expected ...


1

Both 它的眼睛大大的 and 它的眼睛很大 means the same. However, 它的眼睛大大的 sounds cutie, animating, or vivid(maybe also girlish). 它的眼睛很大 only addresses the fact and doesn't have that effect.


1

Reduplication of adjective put emphasis on it Same as English: "big" in "He has big big eyes" is more emphasized than the simple "big" in "He has big eyes" 他有大大的眼睛 = he has very big eyes 它的眼睛大大的 = his eyes are very big Notice, not all adjective can be reduplicated, for example we do not reduplicate 巨 because 巨 is already a higher superlative of 大 Also, ...


1

劳驾、做你有那个时? This appears to be an almost word-for-word direct translation of: Excuse me, do you have the time? But this expression is idiomatic in English, so it's not going to translate well. I don't think it would be understandable. What's wrong with it? 劳驾 = excuse me; I believe this is correct and polite (maybe a bit rare). I'd probably say 麻烦你了 (...


1

for someone who new in Chinese, when you see 了, just seem as "it's already done" it's suit for 70% situation, and in this situation, it can be ignored, if you delete 了,the meaning doesn't change, it's just emphasize "its done, its done, its done" if you feel the meaning is strange, than …. just ignore it. in almost 99% of situation the meaning wont change, ...


1

Not necessarily. It depends. If you talk to the person face 2 face, then it is obvious that that person is not in 丽江 However, if you text to some one the same, you don't know whether that person is still in 丽江 or not. In this situation, it can mean either of it.


1

No. I think the bigger problem here is: word choice. Swapping 审问 out for 拷问 would make the whole sentence more Chinese. 拷问 is defined in ABC as: v. interrogate with torture n. third degree Giving someone the third degree is something we also speak of often enough in English for "interrogations". This might also be confused with 考问, and vice ...


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