Hot answers tagged

5

Strictly speaking, your translation is incorrect and that is what is tripping you up. 不小心 has many interpretations here, and the one employed in all these examples is along the lines of "wasn't paying attention" or "was not being careful" -- this implies it is NOT actually playing the role of an adverb in the sentence. As such, 地 is not required. In ...


4

This is one of those questions that a native speaker with a sound grammatical knowledge might be able to answer better, but from my point of view (as a native speaker with little grammatical knowledge), I think the best way to explain would be to show what the difference is to the listener. As you may or may not know, the particle 是 is not always necessary ...


4

The trick here is that 是...的 is wrapping the phrase 怎么学习汉语 and adds emphasis to the how part of the phrase. The 是...的 is fairly subtle and there are a few decent articles on it online like this one. As another responder mentioned there is a bit of a past tense sense to the construction because it's implied that you're asking for details about something ...


4

These are both idioms (成语) with fixed structures, so deleting the 一 (yī) = "one" would change the meaning, and make it nonsensical. This also holds for Chinese words such as 一起 and 第一. 一丝不苟 basically means "[even] one thread not careless", referring to meticulousness. 不屑一顾 basically means "disdain [even] one consideration", or "disdain even considering it ...


4

Chinese grammar wiki has a page for the "每 + measure word + noun + 都" structure to express "every". Sometimes when the noun is also a measure word (like your example, 每天都), the "measure word" part does not show up in the structure. And it is to emphasize the "every".


4

It will make more sense to you if you understand it as: 孩子[由于不小心]踢到椅子. 不小心 here is the cause of 踢到椅子. In English, it can be The kid kicked the chair due to his carelessness.


4

You need a subject before the disposal marker "把" and 昨天 is not a subject If you add a subject in your sentence and write 昨天他把我吃得站不起来 (yesterday, he ate me to the point of I couldn't stand up) The verb (eat) would not match the result (I couldn't stand up) What would make sense, is something like: "昨天他把我打得站不起来" (yesterday, he beat me to the point of I ...


3

I think you are making a fundamental mistake. Your conscious or otherwise presumption is, Western Grammar is correct and it must therefore apply, without reservation, to Chinese. Words are placed in categories such as 'preposition', but words refuse to remain in their categories. This is true in Chinese and English. And dear old Aunty Wiki blathers on about ...


3

Ergative constructions (作格结构) is one name for a phenomenon where the one subject argument in the intransitive version of the construction is the same as the direct object of the transitive version. These ergative verbs are variously called labile verbs, unaccusative verbs (非宾格动词), anticausative verbs; they have even been posited as reflecting a sort of ...


3

I am no grammar expert, but let me attempt an answer based on my level of attainment. I am sure others could do better. This is one of the most commonly occurring and useful word in the Chinese language, just about behind 的 & 了。 The problem is, (just like 的 & 了), it is a preposition, and when used in combination it becomes a verb, a conjunction, ...


3

如果没有老师,我们——所有学生——就绝不可能在听众面前说中文。 I think that "all the students" must be translated and not omitted; here it is used for emphasis. And "would never be able to " is 绝不可能。


3

The interesting phenomenon in this example is the use of 了。。。了 to indicate an ongoing action. In cases where the ongoing verb takes an object (like 英语 in your sentence), the verb is repeated. If the object is understood, it doesn't need to be repeated. For example, if you've established with your interlocutor that you're studying English, you might say ...


2

我学英语学了4年了. This kind of repetition is used for the extent complement. The intention is to make the complement remarkable so that the interlocutor can easily get the point that has been made. 我学英语学了4年 VS 我学了4年英语 The former is clear that the point you are trying to make is 学了4年. The latter can be understood differently depending on the emphasis you put. ...


2

"我学英语" = "I learn English" -- it is the main clause "学了4年了" = "have learned (it) for four years" -- it is the relative clause that give us additional information of 'the duration of the action' . "我学英语学了4年了" = "I learn English, and I have learned it for four years" Repeat the verb in the relative clause that state the duration of the action is a common ...


2

Cases/Examples that you'd use 怎么 rather than 如何. 你怎么在这儿? Why are you here? (Can be used as a joke to tease someone for showing up at the same place you did) 这支笔怎么会在这里?Why is this pen over here? 你怎么会回答这题? How did you manage to answer this question? 他怎么可能会下厨?How is it possible that he knows how to cook? 你怎么来了? Why did you come here? (An expression of ...


2

I think 今天星期三 is more usual to be used than 今天刚星期三. And some people use this kind of structure to concatenate other structure. For example: 我两部电脑, If you want to describe that both of two computers of your own are break. You can say that 我两部电脑都壞了. This example show that 都壞了 concatenate after 我两部电脑. And sometimes, people do not need to use a verb in ...


2

发生了什么事 VS 发生什么事了 There isn't essential difference between them. They mean the same and are interchangeable.


2

发生了什么事? 事 refers to 事情(affair, matter, thing, etc). 什么事情 is specific - what thing. 发生了什么 is generic. They can be interchangeable in most of context, in which we take 发生了什么 as the shorthand for 发生了什么事. However, 发生了什么 could also be shorthand for 发生了什么现象,发生了什么反应,发生了什么变化,etc. E.g. 这两种物质混在一起会发生什么?== 这两种物质混在一起会发生什么现象/变化? In the case above, 这两种物质混在一起会发生什么事 ...


2

A good start is the Chinese Grammar Wiki page for 为, which I'll go through. Each of the relevant webpages have multiple examples, but I'll add some in-the-field examples. By itself, 为 basically means "for" along with some related definitions. Perhaps the "cases where we don't translate it" arise when 为 is used within words such as 因为, 为什么, 成为, 行为, 为何, 以为, ...


2

Quote:- "I'd like to know if there are specific ways to use each measure word or all can be use freely" If I understand the question correctly, my answer is:- (1) there are specific ways to use each "measure word" Just like in English or I suspect any other language, you have measure words like a "troop" of monkeys, a "flock" of birds, and you could not ...


2

There are several usages of 為, I just list part of it. Sometimes, 為 show that things are or are done for object after 為. For example, 他為我留了一塊蛋糕。 in English: He left a piece of cake for me. This example shows that thing was done for object after 為 (我). Sometimes, 為 shows that something after 為 is used to describe something before 為. 這餐花費為1000元。 in English: ...


2

每 bla bla 都 is a very commonly seen structure in Chinese. You could leave 都 out. 小松鼠每天都到地里去,看看结花生了没有。 The little squirrel goes down to the ground every day, to see if the peanut plants have any fruit. If the little squirrel 到地底去看看, he might have more luck! Maybe he could ask his friend 鼹鼠去看一看? 结: 结出果实 bear fruit However, the peanut is generally known as ...


2

That is normal status during 春节:吃得站不起来!Your sentence is ok. 昨天把我吃得站不起来了。 Yesterday I ate so much I couldn't stand up! 昨天把我冻得感冒。 Yesterday I got so cold I caught a cold!


2

昨天把我吃得站不起来了 The sentence might be fine if you put it into a proper context. By itself, it sounds a little stilted. It will be more natural if we add 都 for emphasis. 昨天把我吃得都站不起来了 It's worth to note that this use of 把 is very common. This definition in dictionaries explains the usage: 表示致使,后面的动词通常带有表示结果的补语 E. g. 把他急坏了.


2

If you removed the complement, the sentence becomes 昨天吃我. The verb is acting in the incorrect direction. 我 should be the subject here not the object. Correcting this mistake, we get 昨天我吃 which is still awkward because 吃 needs an object [1]. The 把 construction does not really work in this setting. The complement in 把 describes the object, but you are trying ...


2

Quote from the page on chineseboost: Use a descriptive complement You may be interested to know that you can also use 把 to get a little bit more descriptive and interesting than the standard things being moved around, changed, affected etc. This is commonly done with a descriptive complement. This just means that some extra description comes right ...


1

In your examples, take 去 as to. She went 'to' the market ("to" do some shopping): 她上街("去"买东西)'去'了 is a complete translation for the sentence, but wordy with two 去, so just dismiss any. 寄包裹去上海怎么寄: How to deliver the package "to" Shanghai 回家去: go home or go "to" the living place (no "to" as "home" is an adv here) 信寄去了没有: Have you sent the letter "to" (...


1

我是一个语言的从教者,也是一个语言学习的爱好者。 This sentence reminds us of the fact that I'm also a language hobbyist(assuming I'm well known as a 语言的从教者). 我既是一个语言的从教者,也是一个语言学习的爱好者。 With 既, it parallels the two roles (语言的从教者 and 语言学习的爱好者), which share the same level of importance.


1

I suggest beginning with the Chinese Grammar Wiki's article Preposition, where there's many examples and links. In practice, I expect these terms are all called "prepositions" 介系词 (or 介词), as the distinction in terminology is unimportant (and confusing). [To be honest, this sounds like a linguistics question with "in Chinese" tacked on. Consider asking at ...


1

The nearest you'll get to ergative is the Chinese use of 把:you could argue 把 marks ergative case, but just as easily, you could say, 把 marks accusative case and ergative is accusative under another name! (你快点儿) 把作业做完! Mostly, 把 gets used like this: 我把门开了。 So is '把门‘ accusative, or ergative, or both, or neither? Since there really are no case markings, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible