New answers tagged

0

If you want to say or mean "a definite plan" has been formulated or decided upon then 计划 is more suitable. If you want to mean "some kind of decision" has been made, then 打算 is better. Thus:- 你有什么计划吗? -- Have you made any plans? 你有什么打算吗? -- Have you made a decision?


1

As a noun, both 打算 and 计划 mean "plan" but 打算 also contains the meaning of "intention" 有去美國的计划 (have the plan of going to The United States) 有去美國的打算 (have the plan of going to The United States/ have the intention of going to The United States) As a verb, both 打算 and 计划 have the meaning of "plan to", but 打算 also contains the meaning of "intend to" ...


1

they are same, 打算 often used in oral, 计划 is more formal.


2

Basically, 的 can always be omitted for a simple adjective. But for emphasis of the adjective, 的 is added (so omit it if not). For the omission of 的, check this link, kind of CN quora (if it is fine to read). The third sentence is an exception of your description. 很多 comes after 人, so it is (人很多)的地方 and 的 cannot be omitted here to avoid ambiguity.


0

(a) 这是我车? (b) 这是我的车? (a) does sound "un-Chinese" For example when answering a question, like, 这是谁的车? you answer 车是我的, and not 是我车. Coming back to the question, why can't we say 你的国家的医院好吗? I think if you really want the 1st 的 there, the sentence might end up as:- 你的国家有好的医院吗?


3

The trick is the omission behind (again). It is the objective that is omitted, not the MW words. The complete words are: 三年(时间),四周(时间), etc As you can see now, there are MW words. Just too obvious to add the objective again. Another example, after business dinner in CN, people usually ask 刚喝了几杯, which means 几杯(酒). But we never say 几酒.


2

TL;DR: Yes and no. The most relevant grammar structures are: 没 + [verb] (with no 了), e.g. 我今天没吃饭 (I haven't eaten today); [duration] + 没 + [verb] + 了, e.g., 我一天没吃饭了 (I didn't eat for one day); along with: 没 + [noun] + 了, e.g., 我没有米饭了 (I don't have rice [anymore]); 不 + [verb] + 了, e.g., 我今天不吃饭了 (I won't eat today [anymore]). These last two use the change-...


0

得弄, are neither one word nor two words because they are not to be read together. The sentence structure is:- 首先, (first and foremost),得弄清楚, (decide / work out clearly), 我们需要什么, (what is it we really need) The sentence works just as well without the 得 as, in my view, it is superfluous.


1

This rule implies that 1 and 2 are correct but 3 and 4 are incorrect. Yes, it seems that this rule is applicable. I can't think an example against it off the top of my head. (i.e. 我没写了一本书,我没写一本书了,我没说那句话了,我没说了那句话,我没睡了一个晚上,我没睡一个晚上了) Those examples are all awkward because of that additional 了. In 我没睡了一个晚上, it has to be 我一个晚上没睡. 我没睡一个晚上 isn't natural and ...


1

As a particle, 了 has two major functions (1) [aspect marker] indicating completed action (2) [final particle] indicating change of situation *It can also be a final particle for emphasis or adding emotional tone * [没 + V] or [没有 + V] denotes "absent of the action" If an action is absent, it cannot be a completed action You can only use 了 ...


1

我昨天吃完西瓜后有过敏反应,所以现在不吃西瓜。 Yet for me, in daily life I would just say: 昨天吃完西瓜过敏,今天不吃了。


0

早晨(的)太阳 是 红(色) 的。 The sun of morning is (a) red (one). 中午(的)太阳 又变成了 白(色) 的。 中午(的)太阳 又变成 白(色) 的了。 While the sun of noon change to (a) white (one). 中午(的)太阳 又变 白 了。 While the sun of noon change white.


2

As for the 太阳 part, dan already has a good explanation. I am going answer the other questions you asked. 教育质量 and 教育的质量 are both correct and mean the same thing. Note that the counterpart of 教育质量 in English without "of" should be "education quality" but not "quality education". I am not sure whether "education quality" is colloquial in English but this ...


5

早晨的太阳为什么是红色的 中午太阳又变白了 中午的太阳又变白了 is a correct sentence. But, if you put that 的, you'd change the parsing: [中午的太阳][又变白了] vs [中午][太阳又变白了] The original sentence uses 中午 adverbially, which is for the effect of contrast: Why the sun in the morning is red, while at noon(when it comes to noon) it becomes white.(I'm curious how come). 中午的太阳又变白了 would ...


1

Basically, when 的 is used after a noun or pronoun it represents the genitive, possessive case: 我的 = my, 你的 = your, 他的 = his. The genitive case is always an adjective. 的 represents 's. That said, Chinese often omits 的:红色女装 "The primary sense [of 'of'] in Old English still was "away," but it shifted in Middle English with use of the word to translate ...


-2

中午太阳又变白了 == 中午“的”太阳又变白“的”了 Here both “的” are omitted. per your example of 教育质量 (quality of education), is short for 教育"的"质量 as 教育 is noun. 科学 can mean science (noun), or a short form of 科学的 scientific (adj). here in "科学模型", 科学 is the latter, hence 的 is omitted. another similar example is 数学模型 == 数学的模型 == mathematical model


3

Well, the trick here is not 的, but the omission behind. The complete sentences below: 1. 早晨的太阳为什么是红色的(太阳/样子). 2. 中午(的时候)太阳又变白了. For the rest expression, you can use the definition of "attributive noun" to explain. 科学的模型 correct, but wordy. Try this, name of student or student name. Cheers.


0

You were minded to say -- you had an allergic reaction after eating watermelon and so decided to stop eating it. But your original sentence ended up saying -- you had an allergic reaction of some kind and so stopped eating watermelon; thus giving the impression that the allergic reaction was not necessarily due to eating watermelon, which we gather is not ...


1

昨天我有过敏反应了, 所以,现在我不吃西瓜了。 Your sentence is grammatical. However, you haven't explicitly said to what you have your allergy. It's not something with grammar though. To be clear and concise, you could say: 我昨天吃西瓜过敏了,现在不能再吃了。 The reason why 了 is not needed at the end of 昨天我吃完西瓜有过敏反应 is that 有 already denotes the existence of 过敏反应, so 了 is unnecessary. But if ...


2

Continuing your example: if we remove '已经' 所以,现在我不太爱坐飞机了 still means 'not anymore' because of '现在'. The reason you say '现在' in this sentence must be to compare past and current, so '已经' is optional in this sentence. Now if we also remove '现在' 所以,我不太爱坐飞机了 Well, it still more or less means 'not anymore', because of the '了'. '了' here also somewhat ...


1

来 in this context focuses on the purpose for us to come/ gather together, 要 just will. 要 connotes more of the necessity or even mandatory. 来 is more suggesting and less mandatory. Note: Sometimes the nuance is weak in practice.


1

来 means ‘come’. 今天我們討論一個問題 - we discuss a problem today 今天我們要討論一個問題 - we need to/ are going to discuss a problem today 今天我們來討論一個問題 - we come/ are going to discuss a problem today


1

Yes, you are correct that "来" means 'we are going to' in this scenario. To be honest, as a native Chineses speaker, I cannot tell the difference between "来” and ”要" here.


2

I wish I had seen this question sooner since this is exactly what I use Yabla for:


1

A straightforward approach is to copy/paste the translation output into Pleco. E.g.:


0

It is a pop song title and so some expressive artistic licence could be allowed. It is not the grammar we are hot under the collar about here, but to a native speaker it sounds "fractured, broken, affected", clumsy even, like someone pointed out you don't ordinarily speak like that in real life, just as in English you don't in ordinary conversation say to ...


2

那些 = Those 你很冒險的 = of you being very adventurous 夢 = dreams [那些][你很冒險的][夢] = [Those] [dreams][of you being very adventurous] Those dreams are not adventurous, you are! "你很冒險" means "you are adventurous" "的" is an adjective suffix that turns the regular sentence "你很冒險" into an adjective phrase (你很冒險的) to modify "夢". Q: "Dreams?" "What dreams?" ...


4

It's a song title for singer JJ and it's better translation for Those Adventurous Dreams of Yours because it's written for the writer's girlfreind , and he want to complete the dreams with the girl. ps. there's no one will say 那些你很冒險的夢 in real life.


2

I am not a native speaker, but I would say that it is completely fine to say this. Whether such an expression and choice of words are common, I can't judge. But from a grammatical point of view, I would consider it correct. I would translate this expression as those (very) adventurous dreams of yours or as those (very) adventurous dreams you have/...


1

"da yoyo liang" seems like a dialectal way to say 打110. “da yoyo liang” sounds like a Shanghainese version of 打112.


2

In characters, the phrase is Dǎ yāo yāo líng 打幺幺零 Dial 1-1-0 「一」is not yāo; rather, a different word「幺」is used. See Pronunciation of 壹 / 一 in Mandarin for the use of yāo.


0

I believe it is this 打110 打一一零 dǎ yāo yāo líng (It's the police emergency phone number.) It is very common practice in mainland China to say "yāo" in place of "yī" when pronouncing phone numbers. I've heard it's because 一 (yī) and 七 (qī) sound so similar. I don't believe pronouncing yī as yāo is done outside of phone numbers, e.g., 2011年 would be ...


1

It's standard mandarin. Simple rules: When used in telephone numbers, use yao In certain chess and card games, eg. mahjong, use yao All other circumstances except these two, use yi These chinese webpages explain why and history of its pronunciation evolution: https://www.zhihu.com/question/20325042 https://www.guokr.com/question/103719/


5

When 'fast' refers to no food/drink/both/[sometimes sex] for a period of time by religion (Ramadan, for example), it's "斋戒." When 'fast' refers to no food/drink/both for a period of time for political reasons (hunger strike), it's "绝食/绝食抗议." When 'fast' refers to no food/drink/both for a period of time for medical purposes (blood test/surgery), it's "禁食 (...


5

It is a title of a project, not a sentence. 「一带一路」」refers to "The Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-century Maritime Silk Road" 「一带」(the one belt) refers to 「丝绸之路经济带」 「一路」(the one road) refers to 「21世纪海上丝绸之路」 Both are specific object, therefore the title cannot be just 「带和路」(belts and roads) Using 「一个地带和一条通路」would be too wordy for a title. Not to ...


1

什么也不 indicate don't + anything/everything , 什么都没 indicates haven't / didn't + anything/everything. 我什么都没有 , I don't have anything. 我什么都不要, I don't want anything. 我什么都没做, I didnt do anything, 我什么都不做, I don't want to do anything/ I won't do anything One indicates the situation while another one indicates the intention,


0

You shouldn't expect a strict grammar on the Internet, especially for social media. His meaning is clear, though his grammar is unpleasant. I feel uncomfortable with his sentences just as you do.


-1

他们请经理吃了饭。 It was dinner that they invited the manager to have. 他们请了经理吃饭。 It was the manager that they invited to have dinner.


1

Most likely, I'd say 他们请经理吃饭了 or 他们请经理吃了饭 in practice. 他们请了经理吃饭 might be ok, but it doesn't look a normal word order. Usually, we just say: 他们请了经理 meaning they invited the manager. What that invitation is for is often implied(assuming it can be figured out from the context). This is probably just me. Others might take different opinions.


1

他们请经理吃了饭- subtle emphasize what they eat, but not necessarily. 他们请了经理吃饭- to emphasize who they buy dinner for There's another possible way to say this: 他们请经理吃饭了- subtle emphasis on the thing happened, but not necessarily. It really depends on how you say it, your tune can change the emphasis too. They all have the same meaning. The second one probably ...


1

My package went to Nanjing, but I'm in Beijing; that's the complete opposite Jing. 我的包裹去了南京,但我在北京,这是两个完全反方向的京!


2

我的包裹发到了南京,但是我人在北京,一个完全相反的「京」! 我的包裹发到了南京,但是我人在北京,怎么没发到东京? 我人在北京,但是我的包裹却偏偏背道而驰,跑到南京去了! 我人在北京,但是我的包裹却和我渐行渐远,往南京去了!


1

Your translation is accurate, but the point is that the original joke isn't funny, thus making the translation strange. Advice 1: Better not state both 北京 & 南京. 快递投给了南京,跟我在的京城反了个边。 Advice 2: Better not play on 南 & 北. 我人在北京,快递给发了南京,真是中南海的文件发了总统府。


2

In speech, you can say: 我人在'北'京,快递却发到了'南'京. It would add some joking effect when you put a bit emphasis on 北 and 南. You don't have to say they are opposite literally. Your audience would seize that from your tone, which is the whole point of the joke.


2

I think in this case 还 doesn't indicate the continuation or in addion to. It denotes this sense defined in dictionaries: (表示对某件事物没想到如此, 而居然如此)(something goes unlike one's original thought): He really is resourceful. 他还真有办法。 So, 快下雪了,我还以为今天是好天气 The sentence is saying that my original thought was today would be good weather, but now it will ...


0

You always need the context to interpret correctly. Maybe the person likes snow? Nothing like a beautiful snowy day! 快下雪了, It's gonna snow soon, 我还以为今天是好天气。 I still reckon today's weather is great. 还以为: still believe


5

It implies that I had been thinking today is a good day, until I noticed that it would snow soon. 还 means 本来 here, it indicates a continuation of original thought. For no. 3, I wouldn't say it's wrong, but it sounds very Chinglish to me. It couldn't be "also", because 快下雪 means bad weather, which is opposite to good weather.


0

Recommend to use 和宁 with your surname, example: 王和宁


1

It's misleading to distinguish 不/没 by the "tense" it indicates. The information about time is always inferred form the whole context in Chinese. Bold font is where the time information is mainly inferred from. 1.没 表 已然/不存在(没 indicates things that have already become a fact, which can also be a presumed fact/the state of non existence.) 他什么坏事都没干。(He hasn't ...


4

Let's begin with 什么都 meaning "everything"; see Expressing "everything" with "shenme dou" at the Chinese Grammar Wiki. We can add a verb or an adjective afterwards: 什么都 + adjective 什么都美丽 (everything is beautiful) 什么都辣 (everything is spicy) 什么都简单 (everything is simple) which we negate with 不: 什么都不美丽 (everything is not beautiful) 什么都不辣 (...


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