17

Brief Answers Is it indeed the case that the lower component of 䏍 is different from the lower component of 青? Yes in the etymology sense (the lower component of 䏍 is 肉, and the lower component of 青 is 丹), but it's not necessary to distinguish them in your hand writing – though, maybe some teachers, especially those in Taiwan, encourage you to do so – you ...


9

I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier and I'm even more surprised no one thought of this before me, well, I'm sure someone did just didn't find it on the internet. I was installing fonts and noticed some of the fonts that came with my operating system - OS X Mountain Lion - was cursive Chinese. So a thought occurred to me. Cut and paste the same ...


9

Neither the PRC form「黄」nor the ROC/HK form「黃」contains「艸・艹」. The top of the PRC form「黄」is written as「龷」. 商甲甲806合集32509商甲京津636 西周金耳尊集成6007 「黃」originally depicted a person「大」with a swollen chest/abdomen as a kind of deformity/sickness, indicating the meaning weak, feeble; a mouth「口」was added to the top later, emphasising the person sighing in distress. The ...


8

Some reasons I'm surprised weren't mentioned above: 1) Written stroke order is still the primary system for looking up characters in a dictionary! Yes, you can break them down by radicals & composition, but if you don't know stroke count/order (because you've never written them yourself) you'll likely fail to find what you're looking for. 2) If you ...


7

That's 習近平 (Xi Jinping)'s signature. Just written in Traditional Chinese characters. EDIT: This is Xi's signature on his dissertation (Doctor of Laws):


7

I was secretly expecting this question. :) In handwritten and calligraphic realization, these characters can be tough to distinguish, although the context will help you a lot. In printed text, the middle 横 héng stroke in 曰 is not touching the right side of the character, in 日 the middle stroke is entirely through, at least in most fonts. If not, it is only ...


6

Just adding this to the already answered question to point out a few pertinent things: (1) the question of whether the 月/⺝ as seen in e.g. 能青育 and so on is really 'the same' or 'different' can be answered on many levels; on some levels, those components are the 'same' (because they 'look the same'), on other levels, they are 'different' (because they ...


5

The modern handwriting scripts of Chinese characters are 楷书, 行书 and 草书. 楷书 is the standard and official handwriting script, which is made up by 笔画 (strokes) and looks like printing script. It is the only handwriting script taught in primary schools in China, because it is the only legal standard of handwriting script. 行书 is the handwriting script that ...


5

They can understand and will occasionally use simplified Chinese 1、台湾老的文化人都认识简体字。过去,台湾像大陆一样流行简体字。只是在中华人民共和国政府宣布实行简化字方案后,台湾当局才不许公共场合出现简体字,以表示不承认共党政府。但是,老人手写字依然有用简体字。我曾在回答关于“煎体字”问体中附一张照片,是1958年蒋介石写给郝伯村的信,信中就有几十个与我们完全一样的简体字。 2、书法爱好者认识简体字。简体字大量是行书、草书规范化。经常看古人书帖自然会认识简体字。 3、经常与大陆往来的人会认识简体字。要说台湾与大陆往来密切,哪里也比不上厦门。厦门一切公共场合,包括与台湾的经济、学术交流,都是规范字,台商工厂中也如是。看多了自然就认识了。...


4

It really boils down to the very point: your knowledge of characters and especially how familiar you are with them. I have a hard time reading a lot of things handwritten in Chinese, while at other times I notice that I can just spell out all the characters, even if I have never seen a single character from that person. Some people have easy to read ...


4

It is a rarely used Chinese character. It has two pronunciation: "zhǎn" and "zhàn". English meaning: to open, to stretch; to extend, to unfold; to dilate; to prolong. The radical of 㠭 is 工, such as the radical of 林 or 森 is 木. The stroke order of 㠭 is If you want to learn more common stroke orders of Chinese characters, I recommend to read learn Chinese ...


4

It says 阳台还有衣服 Yángtái háiyǒu yīfu This directly translates to "balcony still has clothes". More specifically: 阳台 (yángtái) = balcony (or something similar, like a veranda) 还有 (háiyǒu) = still has (in this context) 衣服 (yīfú) = clothes


4

It's correctly written, but in a different font called 隶书 Clerical script. It's one of the archaic style of writing. In general Chinese characters in 隶书 look wider, which makes 日 looks like 曰 in regular fonts.


4

It is called or 笔误 or 误笔 (handwriting mistake) or more colloquially "写错笔划" (write a wrong stroke) 写多笔划或是写少笔划都是笔误 俗语: "误将冯京作马凉" 就是典型的笔误引来的误会 Although 笔误 and 误笔 are interchangeable, there's also a term 口误 (slip of the tongue). Therefore, I prefer 笔误 over 误笔


3

To me it looks more like "葉片," which in simplified Chinese is "叶片." However I am not sure if this is scratch script of another character. There was a time in China where Chinese was further simplified, for example four was simplified from "四" to "の," but later this idea was given up and returned to the nowadays simplified Chinese. Now that I think about it,...


3

If you look more carefully, you can see that the last stroke is different. 贝 bèi ends with a 捺 nà stroke. 见 jiàn ends with a 竖湾钩 shùwāngōu, a 'hook'. Check this list.


3

They are written in traditional Chinese: 茶杏銅鑼, which translated verbatim to Tea, Apricot, Copper, Gong.The four words together do not resemble anything meaningful. I did a google search with the exact four words but cannot find anything related.


3

Organizations often use 印章 while signatures are used personally. If you are representing an organization, 印章 usually are required, but signature is acceptable for a person representing himself. Example: A bank is providing a loan to me, on the contract there will be bank employee's signature, bank's 印章 and my signature, this is acceptable. Of course, if you ...


3

Don't know if it counts, but in mainland China, some people write on the street with a huge writing brush, half as long as an adult is tall. And they only dip the brush in water to write. After the water evaporates, the writing vanishes. It's the same principle as 水写布 Beijing - Public calligraphy by Roman Harak licensed according to CC BY-SA 2.0


3

The simple answer is 'wrong'. 男 is 田 + 力. It might be ok for daily writing, but it would be wrong for any type of exams.


3

Two notes: 艹 is 4 strokes in Taiwan and Hong Kong only. It is less helpful to think of it as a "traditional"/"simplified" difference, as among other standards which use "traditional characters" (e.g. Korean Hanja), it is also 3 strokes. 歡 does not strictly contain 艹; it is historically written with 卝, commonly known as 羊頭. In modern times, the distinction ...


3

Incorrect is a relative term. On the whole, I'm going to say no, it's not incorrect, and it's easier to learn the character if you write it with a hook, because the glyph origin of「少」was「小」compounded with「丿」, and「小」is never written without the hook.


3

I usually look up this dictionary for stroke orders. There could be some other useful sites like this one. I personally apply the second order for 再 and 里 as you quoted. In practice, the stroke order doesn't really matter and you can develop your own stylish based on the standard one. For native speakers, we would only be taught and tested the standard ...


3

I wasn't taught this in schools in China! I think in elementary school, the suggested practice is to keep everything square and sit with straight back for the sake of good eyesight and posture. Turning paper is more of a personal habit I reckon. Just out of curiousity do you turn your head a bit when you write on turned paper as well?


3

We were not taught that, but we write the individual character with an angle naturally. It is hard to write a line parallel to the paper and the table if the paper is also parallel to the table. Some people move papers as they write, some rotate papers, some rotate their bodies... I think this is very personal。


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible