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17

Q is Chinese slang for "chewy", similar to al dente in texture. You can see it in example phrases such as "Q感十足" (very chewy). You would expect foods such as tapioca pearls, gelatinous candies, pasta, or rice to be described as "Q". From my experience, this term is more popular in Taiwan and Hong Kong and less so in the mainland. I have not seen this term ...


10

Q is Hokkien. The character is「食邱」and pronounced ㄎㄧㄨ (kiu, same as "Q"). The Chinese definition is 軟靭 ruǎn rèn (soft and tough) and means the texture of food being chewy. See the post "Q(k‘iu⊦)──軟靭" on the "taiwanlanguage" blog.


10

If you're only going one week, just learn some Mandarin. The advantages of learning Mandarin is that there are a lot of free resources, cheap and useful phrase books, and most people you will run into will understand Mandarin. I've been studying Minnanhua (spoken in Fujian and pretty much mutually intelligible with Taiwanese) for about a year and I ...


6

nóo vs. ló These two are both for literary pronunciation. Since 白頭偕老(白头偕老) is a traditional Chinese idiomatic expression (成語 Chengyu), we tend to pronounce it in the literary way. The difference between these two might be in the sub-dialect aspect. I'd pronounce it as pe̍h-thâu-kai-ló since it's easier for me to pronounce. But I reckon that pe̍h-thiô-kai-...


5

The full lyrics can be found on the Web. (But, there are a few minor errors.) A video with all subtitles can be found on the YouTube site. (There are a few minor errors too.) The lyrics are the words that a mother, who is a singer, tells her daughter whose name is 麗蘭, Lì-lán in Mandarin or Le-lán in Taiwanese Hokkien. The following lyrics have been ...


4

The word tuè/tè in Taiwanese Hokkien is used in contexts where 跟 in Mandarin more explicitly refers to the action of "following"; in the 台灣閩南語常用詞辭典 you can find the word kin-tuè/kun-tè, as written 跟綴. In the 台文/華文線頂辭典, a fuller list of words with 綴 can be found. Perhaps most indicative of its use is the Taiwanese Hokkien equivalent of 跟得上, which is 綴會著 tòe/...


3

There are already several good answers and one has been accepted, but last week in the October 4, 2018 New York Times' "Taiwan Dispatch" In Italy, ‘Al Dente’ Is Prized. In Taiwan, It’s All About Food That’s ‘Q.’ there is more about "Q": Slippery? Chewy? Globby? Not exactly the most flattering adjectives in the culinary world. Luckily, the Taiwanese ...


2

Though Hokkien = 福建 or Fujian,a southeast coastal province facing Taiwan. Hokkien Chinese actually means 闽南语 which is originated from south part of 福建, and also commonly used in Taiwan Island, Southeast Asia and many other Chinese societies overseas. In fact people living in north part of Fujian speak a totally different dialect, which is almost not ...


2

隋 is a more probable candidate for Sui. It is (some form of) Sui in Hakka and Hokkien. There's a 睢 too. 郭 is not a good candidate for Co -- in southern Chinese languages (Hakka, Minnan/Hokkien, Cantonese) it has a final -k. Some variant of Kwok.


1

Cross-posted on Quora this morning, and the answer came in soon. I was told "ui" means "prick" (the verb, not the noun), so I turned that into Mandarin 刺, and my reference gave me 揻, with precisely that sentence as an example: 心肝像針揻。Sim-kuann tshiūnn tsiam ui. (心像被針刺一樣。); (other example: 揻一空 ui tst khang(戳一個洞)). So that's it. Literal translation: My heart ...


1

This might be a case of assimilation, where the b nasalizes because of the m in front. Technically speaking, the syllable mián is "not allowed" because in most varieties of Hokkien, [b] and [m] are allophones of /b/, where [m] only shows up with a nasalized final, e.g., 滿 /buã/ → [muã ~ mua].


1

When pronouncing, both of them are okay since we can tell what (s)he says. But it is informal and incorrect to say mián. We know that /p/ in hokkien is same as b in chinese pinyin, and /b/ in hokkien sounds near /m/. Therefore, /b/ sometimes sounds like /m/. But it is wrong to pronounce or write /b/ as /m/. Pā-bián sounds like mián.


1

The [q]/[k] sound came from the glottal stop [ʔ] which must be placed between「地」and「位」when speaking the word. Contrary to its conventional phonetic notation,「位」actually has a glottal plosive consonant before the vowel. So 'te-ui' is actually read as [te11ʔui22] rather than [te11ui22] without separation between the two letters. The difference is similar to ...


1

You are right, it means 'choose', and the difference of pronunciation, (as a Taiwanese I think it) is due to the song. (The elongation of that note.) So both suán-ti̍k or sng-tia are fine.


1

Though "鬥陣" and "做伙" roughly mean the same thing, there are subtle differences in between these two phrases. As a native speaker, I would say "做伙" is more at "be a friend", whereas "鬥陣" is more at "together". This explains why they appear in the song interesting you. Nevertheless, in everyday speaking nearly nobody would deliberately differentiate one from ...


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