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I think this question should be "Are there any multi-syllabic words in Chinese with a glottal stop?" In common speech, (almost) no words have an actual glottal stop in there, whereas the sound is the one identified by the IPA symbol /ʔ/ and defined as: a type of consonantal sound [...] produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract [...]. ...


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I'm not an expert in Filipino, but I might provide a hint for you to look it up. The former Filipino president, Corazon Aquino, was born Maria Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco, where Cojuangco is pronounced similar to Chinese "许寰哥" ("Brother Kho-Khoan"), which was derived from her grand-grandfather Kho Giok-khoan (许玉寰). (Trivia info: Corazon ...


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AFAIK, a nasal onset consonant and a nasal coda can't appear in the same syllable in Taiwanese (Hokkien)(eg. Bân-lâm instead of Mân-nâm), so mián is illegal to be formed.


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Theoretically, no; colloquially, yes. Glottal stop appears before a syllable "without consonant", like 棉袄 (mián'ǎo, [mjɛnʔau], "cotton coat"). This applies to all such syllables. However, in daily spoken language, emphasis on glottal stops is quite unnatural, so a possible implementation may be [mjɛ̃ːau]. Reference: 現代標準漢語音系


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the internet archive has two hokkkien chinese-english dictionary: A dictionary of the Hok-këèn dialect of the Chinese language Chinese-English dictionary of the vernacular or spoken language of Amoy that, “eng” could be 英, 鶯, 應, 永, 影, 榮, 瑩, 盈, 詠, . . . p174-179 of the 1st, p45-46 of the 2nd and “leng” could be 令, 羚, 寧, 靈, 能, 龍, . . . p448-451 of the 1st, ...


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Quote:- "Which should it be as a part of female name???" I don't know about mainland Hokkien, but in S-E Asia, "Eng", (in Hokkien, sounding like "Eng" of England with a neutral tone), usually stands for 英. Coincidentally, also as in 英国 And even more coincidentally,my wife who is Hokkien also has "Eng", 英 in her name :)


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The Austronesian hypothesis for the origin of Min Nan bah (as quoted on English Wiktionary, as of June 2020), comes from Deng Xiaohua's 1994 paper 〈南方漢語中的古南島語成分〉 ("Proto-Austronesian in Southern Chinese Languages"). I have attached an image here from a secondary source: I see that the 16/17th century (Zhangzhou / Philippine) Hokkien-Spanish ...


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