12

The OP is asking how to type characters, using a pinyin IME, when those characters have a ü in their pinyin spelling. For example, how do you type 绿=lü? This is different than asking how to actually type the letter ü. The answer is to type a v. To follow the example, change to the pinyin IME, type lv and select 绿.


11

Before simply answering "there is such a font", I would like to seriously suggest you should not differentiate a dot and a slash. The reasons are: Many Chinese people don't distinguish them when writing, even calligraphers. We care about "fast" and "beautiful". The standard glyphs among mainland, Taiwan/Hong Kong, Japan and ...


9

I think you can try the backslash "\".


8

Install input method tools such as Google Pinyin Windows only type u start to input then type follow to input radicals 丨 shu 竖 一 heng 横 丿 pie 撇 礻 shi 示 衤 yi 衣 But I think most easy way is Ctrl+C,Ctrl+V There is a list of radicals. Find it and copy it.


8

I wrote the PinyinTones IME a couple of years ago to do exactly what the OP was asking about: https://www.pinyintones.com/ PinyinTones a Windows IME that outputs Pinyin with tone marks, rather than Chinese characters. Type 1, 2, 3, or 4 after each syllable to add a tone mark -- just as people have been entering Pinyin since the days of ASCII characters. ...


8

nvren 'v' replaces 'ü' in Chinese input.


6

There are many rules for the Cangjie input method. The one you don't understand thoroughly is the rule of omission. Omission in enclosed forms: when part of the character to be decomposed and the form is an enclosed form, only the shape of the enclosure is decomposed; the enclosed forms are omitted Take a look 倉頡輸入法/取碼原則 2 省略大原則 2 The rule of ...


6

The Simplified Chinese Microsoft Pinyin IME is capable of both simplified and traditional characters. When you install it, it will be set for simplified characters. It is set up to toggle between simplified and traditional with the keybinding ctrlshiftF. It is easy to do this accidentally if the IME is active and you do a "Find All" in Visual Studio or a ...


5

Besides Windows OS-included IME's, there's: 搜狗 Sou Gou Pin Yin is my favorite by far. http://pinyin.sogou.com/ You can switch easily between simplified and traditional (if that matters to you), and you can download from several skins. 南極星 NJ Star is one I used for a while: http://www.njstar.com/cms/ Allows you to type in the tones (so you're forced to ...


5

Wubi is indeed very fast, but the cost and benefit makes it less worthwhile. In fact, I'd like to argue most of the professional typewriting systems aren't worth learning. You get AI support on major sound-based IMEs and AI advances a thousand miles a day, soon they will be at least as fast as Wubi and its peers. I'd like to think Wubi is as dead as all ...


5

Usual IME's won't have that feature... so I think you have two approaches here. Use a special IME or IME scheme, for example 地球拼音 from 中州韵输入法引擎(RIME). Reference: this Chinese post Type Chinese first, then search for a Chinese-Pinyin conversion tool/online app, for example http://hanyu.iciba.com/pinyin.


5

Try using Terra-Pinyin (地球拼音) which runs on rime (中州韻) which runs on either ibus or fcitx. It allows you to input using "-" to represent 1st tone, "/" to represent 2nd tone, ">" to represent 3rd tone, "\" to represent 4th tone. I honestly don't remember the entire install process, but I give an outline as best as I can remember (but I may be wrong in some ...


4

Use your own IME: 1) 2) Make sure that your IME is: 3) Choose "Phoetic" and directly input what you want.


4

Yes, you're right. The phenomenon of 豆腐 dòufu is the result of tone sandhi (连续变调 liánxù biàndiào). IME does not support tone sandhi, so you're unable to search for it as a neutral tone. The only accepted tone entry for 腐 is 3rd tone fǔ.


4

I'll just dump words, and put all data at the end to support my claims as much as I can. Mainland The most common input editor by far on the mainland is pinyin input. Sougou, Windows or Mac's native IME, google's IME (which had an incident of plagiarizing sougou's database), QQ Pinyin, Baidu pinyin etc. For people not satisfied by regular Quanyin (whole) ...


4

Many people in Hong Kong use Quick aka 速成 or Simplified Cangjie. There is a wiki link for this input method:Simplified Cangjie There is a build-in Quick IME in Windows and Mac. Most of the Quick users use it. Quick users type Chinese using Quick on smartphone too, as the build-in IME of smartphone that selling in Hong Kong usually support Quick. However, ...


4

I will elaborate on my comment above, as you wished. The main reason for this behavior of your IME software is that it is configured to make guesses about what you want to type. Since there are so many Chinese characters with the same pinyin initials and finals, it has to. But it also tries to save you from typing, so that you don't have to type out long ...


4

I would recommend Google Pinyin which I use everyday: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.inputmethod.pinyin


4

Chinese Input Methods Introduction: Pinyin methods. Bing Out-of-box on windows in Chinese language. Very elegant. Pure typing. Sougou Most users. Most powerful word source. Most ADs. It provides anything you want and don't want. QQ Powerful than Bing, less useless functions than Sogou. I use QQ 精简 edition on windows. Google Only if you are a geek. 双拼(...


4

Well, actually many input tools like Sogou and MSpinyin have already had such functions. I don't know a lot of the database you referred to, but I guess it is the database of China's household registration department. I guess, in that system, not only do you need to register these antediluvian names, but you also have to select these obscure characters ...


3

I try to answer for the mainland China part. And I only mention Pinyin IME here because that's what I and the majority use. Windows: IMHO, the best Pinyin IME on Windows is Sogou Pinyin regarding match rate. As you might already know, Pinyin are not 1-to-1. Sogou Pinyin has the highest match rate of all IMEs I've used. I recommend you to try it if you're ...


3

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/canton-guang-dong-pin-yin/id385519764?mt=8 or use stroke keyboard. Or ask Siri. The Cantonese version of Siri can understand Cantonese. Edit: Apple does not have such a keyboard and as you would know iOS does not allow custom keyboards. Anything suggested is a workaround. Apple now allows custom keyboards in iOS 8. ...


3

As you are using the "Pinyin - Traditional" input method, maybe what you can see will only be the traditional character "嗎". To convert it into simplified Chinese, try this tool by pasting it into the blank and click the second button. By the way, sometimes we also use "麼" (or "么" in simplified form) at the end of a question. And the corresponding Pinyin ...


3

Wubihua input method. You can find this on older chinese phones hardware keys, or with a software keyboard on smartphones. It consists of just 5 buttons, each representing a basic stroke type. You tap them in the order of writing and suggestions of the most likely character come up. My personal favourite is multiling keyboard on Android. I have no idea how ...


3

You need 五笔输入法, but I think it would be very difficult to learn, even to native Chinese speakers. I think the best way to do it is draw it with mouse, some input method support the feature.


3

You just need an input method with a dictionary of bushou(部首) characters. While you are running Fedora Linux, I recommend you to try an open source input method engine called Rime. There are two front-ends available for Linux distros: ibus-rime and fcitx-rime. And it is cross-platfom, which means you can use your own configuration on Windows, Mac OS X and ...


3

All the comments above are great. Though there is one thing that I seldom hear people mention, which is the benefit to your reading when you use a stroke-based input method. This is because fuzzy recognition with Pinyin and bopomofo (注音符號) allow you to type entire phrases barely considering the characters you type, except to the extent that you are ...


3

Use Pinyin. It's both faster, easier to learn, and more versatile. By the time you start learning Chinese, you should have alread started learning Pinyin. So there is no additional "rules" to learn before you can type. Speaking of speed, Wubi was fast in 1980s because Pinyin IMs had to deal with many characters with the same pronounciation, while Wubi ...


3

I don't use Google pinyin on Linux, but a lot of (simplified) Chinese IME use Shift + 6 to produce ellipsis. I assume the Google pinyin might follow the trend. And by the way, you can try all the symbol keys on the keyboard with the Chinese IME. They do not always produce the "full-width" version of the symbol on the keyboard. Some Chinese specific ...


2

I use the Taiwan Pinyin.. You just have to add "Chinese (traditional, Taiwan)". It is by default set to bopomofo, so when you add the keyboard, you just have to go to properties, then to the last tab and change it to 漢語拼音. You can decide when you want to type with tones or not. If for example you want to type a sentence with a name on it, you just type ...


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