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The accepted answer is simply wrong. It is probably from a Chinese folk tale since it claims to be Chinese. I daresay I have read similar folktales, especially the swallow-the-bead-and-turn-into-a-dragon part, when I was a kid. I cannot figure out the exact one. But it is easy to search out folk stories with similar motifs. e.g. https://book.douban.com/...


2

"he who is in a rush shall walk slowly” was translation of a Japanese proberbs, and many of them came from Chinese literatures The idiom 欲速則不達 (If you rush you are more likely not getting there) came from 論語 and the writer was 子路.


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When lies are made the truth, the truth becomes lies.


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A google book search of “hieun tse” revealed a book “International Folk Tales: A collection of Ancient Folk tales” I would say that the story is “un-chinese”, created without knowledge of the culture, and the people.


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There's official English version of The Romance of Three Kingdoms To find out the names of characters and places in Chinese characters, you can just input them in Google search, for example "Cao Cao", and you'll find entries listed the Chinese characters of this name Cáo Cāo (曹操; 155 – March 15, 220) At Google translate: Input 曹操 in the request field (...


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