7

In Chinese forum, we use the term 顶 and 踩. 顶 is like upvote and 踩 downvote.


3

Beside 贊同 (Approve) and 反對 (Oppose), in Taiwan we also use in BBS: 推 (push) for upvote 噓 (boo) for downvote You can see the same words in Reddit r/Taiwan.


2

To vote is 投票 A vote is 一票 I personally translate "upvote" as "加分票" and "downvote" as "減分票/ 扣分票" 我从一篇帖子中获得的最加分票数是 16 - The most upvotes I got from one post is 16 The votes people get from an election are 選票 (selection/ election vote) which is not the same as the upvote/ downvote (add point vote / deduct point vote) in ...


2

The Wikipedia text is arranged in one line of three characters; the picture of the pavilion is in three columns of one character each that just happen to form one line. Traditionally, Chinese was written in vertical columns in which the characters are read from top to bottom in columns ordered from right to left. The text may also be grouped in any number ...


2

It's 放水 in Mandarin too. The meaning is roughly 让对手, or more precisely 让对手赢, and it can be used as you describe. The implications I'm aware of are that you let the opponent win out of kindness (as you say, in order to 给面子), and, depending on how competitive they are, they might see that as an insult. As a reference, MDGB includes the definition as: to throw ...


1

I don't think there are standard names for them in standard mandarin. But we always say in Mandarin number+classifier+noun,so it's 一对三 (a pair of 3),一对十 (a pair of 4)。noun+number+classifier is used in classical Chinese, and many contemporary dialects. While JQKA are written as the English letter, the names are highly colloquial and regional. For example, in ...


1

地(ground, earth) is a collection of 土(soil, dirt) - 我們站在土地上(we stand on the earth/ground). 地 is related to territory and place, such as 地域 (territory), 地方(place), 地點(location). 土 is the particles on the crust of the earth.


1

放水 is a situation that one withholds his superior ability in a game and allows the opponent to win or lose but not look so bad. The closest equivalent is "讓一手", or "讓子/棋, but not exactly the same, as 放水 has a negative implication - cheat (the audiences, the referees, sometimes the team he plays for, and teammates). I think its counterpart ...


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