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We say“我等你”. It means"I wait for you". But we don't say“我候你”


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她在网球场上疾如闪电。She is fast as lightning on the tennis court. 上疾 here isn't a word; it's just 上 and 疾 happening to meet at the word boundary. 在……上 is the structure to mean "on" in this sentence. 疾如闪电 is a more literary way of saying 快得像闪电. "疾" has the archaic meaning of "fast; quick", which is rather unproductive in forming phrases ...


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他又没来上课 vs 他又不来上课 他又不来上课 sounds like he knew there was a class, but he didn't attend again. It's more subjective 他又没来上课 suggests he didn't attend the class again for whatever reason. It's more objective.


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没 + (v) = did not + (v) - the verb is a completed action 不 + (v) = do not + (v) - the verb can be in any tense. You can say 明天不来上课 (will not come to class tomorrow) but not 明天没来上课 (did not come to class tomorrow) You can say 昨天没来上课 (did not come to class yesterday) or 昨天不来上课 (did not come to class yesterday) You can say 今天没来上课 (did not come to class ...


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A. 他又没来上课; B. 他又不来上课 These two sentences are showing different feeling of the speaker. Sentence A is describing a rather objective fact: He had been absent from class often, and he was absent once again today. It may translate to "he doesn't show up the class again." The sentence B is spoken with a tone of condemnation beside describing the same ...


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In pinyin erhua is usually written with a natural tone: r 哪儿, like you mentioned above, for example is written: nǎr Erhua is tacked on to the end of the pinyin and the tone is in the usual place for the preceding character. An easier way to see this is probably for a word like 瓶儿. 瓶儿 is written: píngr The erhua is not merged into the pinyin (like you ...


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摆有 is not a single word but rather a simple construct of two separate words 摆 and 有. It could argued that a case could be made to treat it as a single word, but this distinction doesn't really make much of a difference semantically. You're question indicates that you already have a fairly good handle of the way the grammar works. For instance, 放有, like you ...


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Edit: According to 現代漢語八百詞 (p.630), 有 (which means “possess”) is a verb that can follow a monosyllabic verb to form a tightly-bound term. In linguistic terms, it is called a serial verb compound. 桌上有一卷书 (there is a book on the table) 桌上摆有一卷书 (there is a book placed on the table) - 摆 explains how the book is situated on the table -- it laid/ sits there More ...


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