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0

The trees,some are tall, some are short (relatively).


9

It seems the author returned home after a long period of absence. He felt heartbreak and lost because the person who used to greet his homecoming with heartwarming smiles was gone, but the yard of unattended, wildly grown, green trees. 高高矮矮 means "uneven in height" - some are tall and some are short. Used here, it describes the scene of unattended ...


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高矮 = height (n) 長短 = length (n) 大小 = size (n) 高高矮矮的 = (有些)高的,(有些)矮的 = some are tall, some are short = both tall and short (of different height) 長長短短的 = (有些)長的,(有些)短的 = some are long, some are short = both long and short (of different length) 大大小小的 = (有些)大的,(有些)小的 = some are big, some are small = both big and small (of different size) 高高矮矮的没有花的绿树 = ...


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When you see an AABB type word with A and B are antonyms, generally the author is describing both A and B. So it's actually "tall AND short". 高高矮矮的树 = both tall trees and small trees = Some of the trees are tall and others are small In this case it is just an imagery, the author does not tend to describe the height of the trees, but only to make ...


1

This is a really good question. I assume you have already known that 了 is a sign of perfect aspect/tense. Although it is still controversial among grammarians whether Chinese languages have tenses or aspects, from a learner’s perspective, it is the easiest way to understand it. So what you are asking is, why there is another verb 来 in this sentence. 来 is a ...


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Much like English, A孕育B means 'A gives birth to B'. It can be used figuratively. 奔騰不息的黃河孕育了古老的華夏文明 It's common knowledge that civilisations formed on the banks of rivers. Rivers provide the water needed for agriculture. Therefore, they are prerequisites for the civilisations. Civilisations form because of their presence. So rivers "gave birth" to ...


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There is nothing wrong with using 孕育 as 'give birth to' in a metaphorical sense, 奔腾不息的黄河孕育了古老的华夏文明. A river metaphorically gives birth to civilization or a people. Without the Yellow River, the ancient Chinese civilization would not exist. Without the Singapore River, the Singaporean people would not be here


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To me it's sound like past continuous tense. Without 来了: Her friend called her at the dinner. With 来了:The call came when she was having the dinner.


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I don't think you should regard 来了 as necessarily belonging together. Nor does 了 always indicate the past. 她来了,绕过拐角过来了。 She's coming, (she's) just coming round the corner now. 公共汽车来了。 Here comes the bus. 她吃晚饭的时候她朋友打电话来了。 While she was eating supper her friend called. 她吃晚饭的时候她朋友打来电话了。 While she was eating supper her friend called. Languages tend to like ...


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她朋友打电话来了. 来 here implies that her friend's call is towards her. 她朋友打电话了 just means her friend made a phone call, no direction indicated. Compare 我一会打电话过去 to 我一会打电话过来. Both 过去 and 过来 suggest the direction of the call. Btw, 了 just denotes the completion.


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Verbs in Chinese don't have past tenses. 她朋友打电话来了 -> Her friend called. Or she received a phone call from her friend.


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You can treated it as an abbreviation of : 打印机好像坏了,我按半天了(按钮),一直没反应。 Or in English, .... I have pressed (the buttons on) it for a long time, ....


2

古伦木 and 欧巴 are not character names but two lines in 奇袭白虎团, which is a Korean-war-themed 'Modern Peking Opera'(革命现代京剧, Peking operas written in PRC). The plot involving this two lines is (which is historically accurate, based on records in the Korean War): the Chinese army and North Korean army learn from a South Korean captive the password of a certain South ...


3

You could try: 吃起来很麻烦 I can't agree with the list of hard to eat foods!


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Yes for example 不好吃 味道一般 These two words are not offensive


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难以食用 also implies the object cannot be eaten or it is almost impossible to eat it (e.g. 难以抵挡 = cannot withstand; 难以置信 = unbelievable) 无从下口 also refers to 'can't interject opinion' I suggest 食用不便 (inconvenient to eat) or 吃来麻烦 (trouble to eat) For example, crustaceans with hard shells, fish with fine bones are inconvenient to eat, but not impossible


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无从下口 is a possible idiom in some contexts. eg. 老虎吃田螺,无从下口


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