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8

「乒乓大方卜」 refers to a biscuit-product-line name cap ping pong (Malay for ping-pong brand, forming the 「乒乓」 part) and large square thin crackers (「大方薄餅乾」; 「餅乾」 is omitted and 「卜」 is a phonetic substitution of 「薄」, meaning thin, forming the 「大方卜」 part). The Hup Seng (合成) company has three snack product lines, one of them named cap ping pong On their website (...


4

黄 has two uses - indicating the color yellow, and the surname of a person. You can give any name to your pet, including 黄, but it sounds odd, and people might miss it for 皇 (emperor). You can call him "小黄", or "大黄", then it is fine, especially when it matches his color. You can also nickname your pet "老黄", but better to avoid ...


3

To extend the answer from @r13: These two following '头' refer to 'a person's head': 搞(弄)得头都大了 - something causes my head swollen(meaning you are headache). 搞(弄)得头都暈了 - something causes my head dizziness/confusion. In last case, 头 is not 'head': There are several dialects call '小时-hour(Mandarin)' as '钟头', but it will be commonly understood by most of Chinese. ...


2

I wouldn't find the sentence without 都 to be natural. You might substitute it with 也, and both would be entirely equal to the expressed meaning. In fact, 一点儿不贵 sound like 'a little not expensive' rather than your intended meaning of 'not at all expensive'.


2

There are two things happening here. In your example, 可是这个密码那个密码,搞得头都大了, the second half should be parsed as: (搞得)+(头都大了). It's the same for 弄; see the examples in r13's answer. Basically, 搞得头 and 弄得头 are not a single grammatical entity. "头都大了" is an interesting phrase that's worth looking at. I find it a bit hard to translate, my best attempt is &...


2

搞(弄)得头都大了 - something causes headache. 搞(弄)得头都暈了 - something causes dizziness/confusion. 睡过头 - overslept


1

A bull has strength (有劲) but it is not agile enough to catch up with a hare. All the mighty strength it has is useless in this task of chasing a hare. It is not the same as "殺雞用牛刀 — 大材小用" . A knife that can slaughter a cow can also kill a chicken, but a bull can only do jobs that strength is involved This phrase can be used in any situation that ...


1

It doesn't really make sense in Chinese actually. 媳/媳婦means wife of one's son (or, wife of one's family) in Taiwan, and means wife of oneself in China. If we are to make sense out of this tattoo it'll be "the wife should be independent". The font of 強 is Traditional Chinese (Simplified Chinese would look like 强, notice the difference on the top-...


1

媳妇 = wife, but 媳 could generically mean woman in a historical / poetic use of Chinese (given pretty much all women were married back then) 自 = self 强 = strong 自强 = strong self / capable of being independent. Would say the self improvement interpretation is more likely to be expressed as 自进


1

Literally, 这是我妈妈做的菜 This is my mom's cooking This is my mom's (cooked) dishes and 这是我妈妈的菜 This is my mom's vegetable This is my mom's dishes so the second version only indicates "possession". The first one indicates the "cooking" action. The phrase can be a slang: 这是我妈妈的菜 这是小明的菜 can indicate It is my mom's favorite It is 小明's ...


1

Grammatically, 我妈妈做的菜 is a defining relative clause, whereas 我妈妈的菜 is a noun phrase (possessive). In English, a relative clause is introduced by a relative pronoun, which/ that, and it comes after the noun it describes Examples: the dish that my mother made the picture that my child painted In Chinese grammar, a defining relative clause looks like an ...


1

做 is a verb for 'make' 我妈妈做 = My mother makes 的 in "我妈妈做的" is an 'adjective marker' that marks [我妈妈做] as an [adjectival phrase] that modifies the noun [菜] [我妈妈做的][菜] = [dish] [that my mother made] ~ 的 in 我妈妈的菜 is a 'possessive marker' that marks the object 菜 belongs to the subject 我妈妈 我妈妈的菜 = 'my mother's dish' (she owns it by ordering it, made it ...


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