Hot answers tagged

26

亚洲 is short for 亚细亚洲 while 非洲 is short for 阿非利加洲. See the article "各大洲名称由来".


26

In traditional Chinese, 乾 means "dry", 幹 means "to do", and has the slang meaning of "f**k". Both words are simplified to 干.


25

I found the same situation, living in China for quite some time, and unlike some other people who have answered, I understand exactly what you're asking. It was quite annoying to try to learn new words when the native speaker just tells you the meaning of 3 characters together and doesn't know or can't explain each character's meaning. I think the answer is ...


23

People usually say 山羊 when they mean a goat. --- I don't think so. Goat or Sheep, just only depends on the context or the environment! Actually, the scene of language is as follows: When a sheep comes, what the brain of a Chinese-speaking people presents/thinks about is: "羊 is coming." When a goat comes, what the brain of a Chinese-speaking people ...


23

check the table. This picture says everything.


22

This is actually not one character, but a stylistic conglomeration of the characters in the phrase 招財進寶, meaning "ushering in wealth and prosperity". The characters 財 and 寶 end up being represented with the same 貝 component in this "character". While the left side of 招 (扌) and the right side of 財 (才) are technically not the same component, they look similar ...


21

I've only heard it used in describing sexual situations, and wiktionary.org describes its usage as follows: This idiom usually only refers to a man taking advantage of a woman in a sexual situation. A typical example would be some creepy guy pinching the flight attendant's backside as she walks past. There's also a good discussion at wordreference.com. ...


19

The 月字旁 was originally '肉' & not '月' - 肉 has the meaning of 肉体 meaning 'flesh' or having to do with the 'human body' so it's often seen with body parts. Wikipedia: 肉字旁:臺灣標準中,凡肉字旁的字,都寫作「提肉旁」即,使其不會與「月字旁」相混。《字形表》中,肉字旁只在字的左旁時才寫作「提肉旁」,在字的右旁時採用首筆豎的方式與「月字旁」區分(「月字旁」在右方時,首筆為撇)。但在下方時,則「肉」與「月」首筆都作豎,兩者會相混。


19

Over its long history of usage, the meaning of 息 has evolved. Yes, 息 has the connotation of message. (5) 消息 [message] (6) 又如:信息(音信;消息);息耗(消息,信息) Its original meaning is to breathe;pant. (会意兼形声。从心,从自,自亦声。自,鼻子。古人以为气是从心里通过鼻子呼吸的。本义:喘气;呼吸) And then the meaning was extended, 人之氣急曰喘。舒曰息。引伸爲休息之偁。又引伸爲生長之偁。引伸之義行而鼻息之義廢矣。 [ Breathing slowly was called 息, ...


18

It is very common and, in my personal experience, has similar offensiveness as the f word in English. It can be offensive and quite rude: e.g. in a business negotiation, when the deal is finally broken and one side says: 你他妈的给我滚出去 = "Get your fucking ass out of my office" It may be used in irony among close friends which is not offensive then: E.g. ...


16

There are some differences between these two words. > “着急” Used as an adjective: 1. Something emergent happens (in other words, something horrible or fatal is very likely going to happen), and you feel upset. For example, when you lost your kids or you're going to be late for your work. Example 一位母亲因为找不到她的孩子而非常着急。(Can't use "担心") A ...


16

慢走 is a polite thing to say usually used for someone who is leaving, has two implicit meaning: I don't want you to leave, so please leave slowly, so I can stay a little longer with you. Don't hurry, take care. 慢点儿 has the same meaning, but not as formal as 慢走, and sounds more affable.


15

There is a restaurant in the Ximending district of Taipei, Taiwan, with a giant banner exclaiming; 真他媽的好吃 =~ "Truly f**ing tasty" I equate it to the British "bloody". "That's bloody tasty". Offensive in a formal context, but a commonly accepted expletive.


15

Victor Mair has an essay answering your question directly: Danger + opportunity ≠ crisis, how a misunderstanding about Chinese characters has led many astray.


15

For people to understand better...


15

I'm taking my answer primarily from this 百度知道 post. 呵呵 Hehe is the most general laugh, indicating perhaps just a smile. Its meaning is the most vague and in some situations can imply an embarrassed, self mocking, or even sarcastic laugh. (Update: note the added caution that @shellbye gives in his answer about the meaning of this one. I suggest you keep ...


14

I did a quick whip round of some of my Chinese friends (well, 6 who are online currently) and came to the conclusion it could work either way, and doesn't really matter. One made an interesting point that they don't really point out the difference in Chinese, but that she notices Chinese people say 'sheep' a lot more than 'goat' in English, which I think is ...


14

Frankie's answer is good, but I want to make a clarification on 孤 and 寡. Both of them mean "only one" here, and I don't think "single" is good in this situation since it could mean "unmarried". example: you and a female friend of yours are taking in a club, in a room with the door closed,(of course, I don't recommend this :-) ), unfortunately, your wife ...


14

There are differences in meaning between 明白 and 懂, but they are somewhat subtle. Several Chinese-language websites record Chinese speakers asking the same question, so the difference is certainly not obvious. Nevertheless, the long and short of it is that, for practical purposes, they are interchangeable: people use 懂 and 明白 to mean "I understand" in many ...


14

給 6 用於動詞前,表示加強「被動」或「處置」等語氣。 在這裡是「加強處置的語氣」。 沒有「給」,也可以,但是語氣較弱。 Used before a verb, to enhance the "passive" or "to deal with" and other tones. It is the tone of "to deal with" here (in your example). It is OK without 給, but the tone is weaker.


13

東: 主人。由於古時主位在東,客位在西,所以稱主人為「   東」。如:「房東」、「店東」。 Translation: In ancient times, the host was seated to the east and the guest to the west, so the host was called "East". reference: http://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/yitia/fra/fra01875.htm Personally I have also heard it is because the Sun rises from the east, thus east is seen as the 'emic', or the 'theme'


13

It's a little different from yours at the latter half of the sentence: Life is dear, love is dearer. Both can be given up for freedom. Reference: This is the poem written in 1847 by the Hungarian poet Sándor Petőfi. Here is the original: Szabadság, szerelem! E kettő kell nekem. Szerelmemért föláldozom Az életet, Szabadságért föláldozom ...


13

In theory, 星期日 should be correct. The concept of a week was introduced from the west, the name of days came from the Sun, the Moon and the stars. When they were introduced to China, only Sunday was preserved, the other days were renamed from 1 to 6, so they became 星期日 (Sun -> 日), 星期一 ... 星期六. But in Chinese, 天 and 日 could be used for the meaning of day ...


13

The word your hear is probably 那個 (in traditional characters) / 那个 (in simplified characters). It is pronounced nàge or nèige (in the Pinyin transcription), and it's basic meaning is ‘that’ or ‘that one’. Chinese Grammar Wiki has a nice explanation of how nèige is used as a filler word (follow the link to see examples): In conversation, you may find ...


13

According to 《汉语大词典》, 感冒 means: 犹感受。 一种传染病。多因气候变化,人体抵抗力减弱时为病毒感染所致。 清代官员请假的托辞。 The entries 2 and 3 seem to be somewhat related. Two entries imply two different stories. 水巷孑蠻 talks about the 2nd one. songyuanyao talks about the 3rd one. The question talks about disease, so I focus on this. From 《汉语大词典》, the 18th meaning of 冒: 中医病症名。病者神智不清。...


13

(東漢)許慎《說文解字》 了,尦也。从子,無臂。象形。凡「了」之屬,皆从「了」。盧鳥切。 (清)段玉裁《說文解字注》 了,尦也。 了 means 尦 [ ㄌㄧㄠˋ | liào ]. 尦,行,脛相交也。 「尦」的意思是,行走時,小腿相互交叉。 尦 means the shanks cross each other while walking. Sometimes female models walk in this way. 牛行,腳相交爲尦。 牛在行走的時候,後腳相互交叉稱為「尦」。 尦 means the rear shanks cross each other when ...


13

The generic way to refer to the highest ruler of any country/region is「君主」, corresponding to monarch. If we talk about an English translation, specifically avoiding how these terms are used in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, then「國王」is used to translate the English equivalent of king and「皇帝」is used to translate emperor, which are strictly gender neutral. ...


12

相声 is a form of Chinese traditional stand-up comedy where two two performers talk back and forth to each other, telling a funny story or just chatting about a humorous topic. Because it's a traditional Chinese art form and originates in northern China, it has a higher political status than other Chinese art forms. This means that it gets broadcasted across ...


12

From the wikipedia article: 關於「萌」這個字現今用法的來源,至今依舊眾說紛紜,以下為部份幾種的說法: 有種說法認為,原本所用的詞語應該是「燃え」(もえ),但是因為「萌え」和「燃え」的日語發音相同,且動漫喜好者認為「萌え」更能形容他們對事物喜好的狀態,因此後來都用「萌え」了。 亦有說法認為,這個詞語原本來自較為常用的「燃えている」(燃燒),但由於日文電腦輸入平假名時會智能判斷漢字,而萌え排序在前面,變成現在的寫法。 目前「萌」大多使用在二次元裡,如果遇到刻意將現實世界(三次元)的人套用到二次元的審美的情況,也有可能用到「萌」。 不過這種狀況十分稀少,因為三次元的人通常難以構成萌屬性。 現在「燃え」在中文界解作萌的相對詞,是對熱血的喜愛。 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible