11

年 is not measure word. It is noun. 那年夏天: the summer of that year 那个夏天: that summer They both refer to a specific summer, but the first one leaves the context on the year, while the second one solely focuses on the summer. To demonstrate the difference with follow-up questions: Conversation 1: 那年夏天特别热。It was extremely hot in the summer of that ...


7

You're right that 口 is one of the measure words for 人, but 人 (people/person) and 人口 (population) are two different words. The word 人口 is mostly used for the population of a city or a country instead of a household. You can say 几口人 (how many 'units' of people), 三口人 (three 'units' of people), but not 三口人口 (three 'units' of population).


6

No, of course. Here's a summary about the kinds of cases where 个 is inappropriate. sth slender. e.g. 一根绳子, 一条蛇, 一条路; 一线光明, 一绺头发, 一丝细雨. sth thin. e.g. 一张纸, 一面红旗, 一幅画. sth solid in certain kinds of shapes. e.g. 一块砖, 一团面, 一坨泥. sth amorphous. e.g. 一杯水, 一壶油, 一斤米, 一碗沙子. sth forming part of a greater whole. e.g. 一层楼, 一重山, 一级台阶, 一节甘蔗, 一段木头, 一截电线. sth ...


6

挺,表数量,用于条状物。 As a measure word, 挺 refers to something that is long. In《太平御览》卷八三五,it says 壶中大钱一千,以通九泉之路,蜡烛一挺,以照七尺之尸。 In modern Chinese, 一挺蜡烛 is no longer commonly used.


5

一頓饭 is one meal whereas 一道菜 is one course or one dish. 這頓豐富的晚餐共有十二道菜。 This sumptuous dinner is made up of twelve courses.


5

The other answers are absolutely correct – it’s not smart to talk about countable and uncountable nouns in Chinese. However, like many languages, Chinese does have words that express abstract concepts or that are somehow inherently plural. How are these dealt with in a system where everything must be counted/measured? Here’s how one grammar explains it. ...


5

Chinese doesn't distinguish countable or uncountable. We have unit word in front of almost every noun.


5

Stop reading that article - it is totally wrong. The issue is that 书 and 书本 are both plural and singular at the same time. Which one it is depends solely on the context. For example, it is plural in 我常常讀書: "I read books often". In contrast, it is singular in 把書放下: "Put down the book." You can specify plurals, however. How that actually works is that 本 is a ...


5

You should learn those measure word one by one because most of native speakers don't use "個" for every nouns. But sometimes if you forget or don't know the word you should use, most people still know what you're referring to with the word "個" in most case. Why I said in most case? Here's an example: (Actually, it's a joke.) The foreigners usually have a ...


5

Some noun need a classifier, some doesn't ; 月(month) needs one but 天(day) doesn't. 一年有十二個月 - 月(month) needs a classifier 一年有十二個月份 - 月份(month) needs a classifier 一年有五十二週 - 週(week) doesn't need a classifier 一年有五十二個星期 - 星期(week) needs a classifier 一年有三百六十五天 - 天(day) doesn't need a classifier 一年有四季 - 季(season) doesn't need a classifier 一年有四個季節 - 季節 (...


4

I would say somehow it's true in informal circumstances. But I don't quite agree with the definition of 个化 above in which 个 as a classifier is going with nouns. When you say 一个车 or 一个房子 alone, it definitely sounds odd and ignorant. My take to this, instead, is 个 goes with a verb, being the form of "verb+个". Then it becomes the casual way to express the ...


4

Your first two examples are not proper ones, since Chinese grammar do not usually use plural or singular form, 我有房子 could mean "I have a house" or "I have houses" ; 我有孩子 could mean " I have a child" or "I have children". As for the third example, 我不是坏人, since 坏人 is a description word for the subject, no matter the subject is singular or plural, therefore, ...


4

"只有20-30万只蜜蜂" is a valid sentence in simplified Chinese. You just have to read the two 只 differently, because they have different meanings. The first "只" in the sentence means "only" in both simplified and traditional Chinese and it is read as /zhi3/. (It can also be written as "祇" in traditional Chinese) The second "只" in the sentence, is the simplified ...


4

1.5 lbs = 一磅半 (only when 'and a half') or 一點五磅 1.75 lbs = 一又四分之三磅 or 一點七五磅 Since 個 is actually a unit itself, there should not be 個 when there are units and should also be used after the number such as 一又四分之三個. What's more, if not with half, smaller units are preferred. e.g. 1.75 lbs -> 1 lb 12 oz(一磅十二盎司).


4

在中文里他们正确的读法是下面这样: 3/4 lb = 四分之三磅 1.5 lbs = 一点五磅 1.75 lbs = 一点七五磅


4

From a previously asked question What does the second "幅” mean in the following sentence? 一幅幅 is short for 一幅又一幅 or 一幅接一幅 (one after another) "一幅幅美丽的山水画" means "one beautiful landscape painting after another' 'One after another' can describe 'a group of things or people at one time' or 'one individual after another individual across time ...


4

跟着她“鸡”,“猫”,“狗”地念起来。 “鸡”,“猫”,“狗”地 here works as an adverbial phrase modifying the verb 念. “鸡”,“猫”,“狗” are basic noun words learnt by a beginner. Imagine the scene her 丈夫 following her reading these basic childish words, and you would get the idea of “鸡”,“猫”,“狗”地. Another point is that they don't put 鸡,猫,狗地, but “鸡”,“猫”,“狗”地, because the quotation marks ...


4

Yes, 兩 used to have many more meanings. In the details section of zdic, there's the following additional meanings: (4) 匹(长四丈) 归夫人鱼轩,重锦三十两。——《左传·闵公二年》 (5) 通“辆”。车一乘 [used for buses,carts,etc.] 武王戎车三百两。——《书·牧誓·序》 之子于归,百两御之。——《诗·召南·鹊巢》 Definition 4 shows that it's also a measure word for silk fabric, but in this context definition 5 ...


4

Your intuition is correct.「頓」and also「餐」are measure word for meals, while「碗」is a measure word for bowls (of rice). Since「飯」refers to both meal and cooked rice, the statement of how much you ate is inferred from the measure word. To add: I would suggest that「碗」does not really refer to plate of food, as Chinese does not present meals that way. The western ...


3

I'd say that 根 is the most common unit word for long, straight objects, such as 一根葱 (spring onion), while 条 is used for things that may be long and wiggly, such as 一条河, 一条路, or 一条鱼. Overall, though, your meaning wouldn't be confused. In terms of normal speech, measure words don't matter so much as long as you don't use one that's blatantly wrong. In this ...


3

I think the main reason is that 油条 already includes the character 条, so to avoid double use, we say 一根油条. This is the same as we say 一根面条,一根薯条,一根木条,...


3

一张音乐 is short for 一张音乐专辑 (a music album) or 一张音乐CD (a music CD), etc., in which cases the noun at the end of the expression is flat (LP disc, CD) and can take 张 as classifier. 一曲音乐 is a 'tuneful' of music or a 'melody-ful' of music, is also translated as 'a piece of music', I am just guessing but this could mean a piece of music which consists of at least ...


3

I think all the sentences with 几 above can turn into interrogative sentences. For example: 后面有几个人笑起来了? 你家有几口人? 上海有几个火车站? In the mainland mandarin, we usually put 好 in front of 几 in the declarative sentence to indicate that there are more than one. For example: 后面有(好)几个人笑起来了。// 好 can be omitted without changing the meaning. 你家有好几口人。// 好 ...


3

Misusing quantifiers is a practice of rhetorics. Consider the examples of 一滩猫 and 一坨代码. 滩 gives a metaphor noting the liquidity of a cat, and 坨 implies that the code is badly programmed to look like shit. In orthographic usages, 条 cannot quantify 猫. However, if you have a specific rhetorical purpose, you may quantify anything with any quantifier you prefer. ...


3

帶把槍 bring a gun. 切條魚 cut a fish. 吃碗麵 eat a bowl of noodles. 裝盒餅乾 pack a box of cookies. Here measure words (better see them as classifiers) are 把, 條, 碗, 盒 where the number of one is usually omitted. If it's more than one, the number 2, 3, 4... would not be left unsaid or unwritten. (And interestingly 把, 條, 碗 imply singular and 盒 implies a group which ...


3

條 can be a measure word for huge things. For example, 一条河, 一条烟囱, 一条船(all long and thin but huge) - you can't use 根 for huge things 条 can be a measure word for living things. For example, 一条蚯蚓, 一条蛇, 一条狗 (all long and thin and alive) - Don't use 根 for living things 条 can be a measure word for thin and long things with flat surface, For example, 一条手帕. 一条毛巾 (...


2

本 in 书本 is a noun meaning booklet; notebook, which is completely different from its function as a measure word. Therefore 书本 is not the plural form for book, but a general/abstract reference to 'books and notepads'. The rule of '[noun] + [measure word]' does not exist, very few instances of which could make any sense. 书本 is just one of these rare ...


2

“昨天晚上买了(一)张彩票,结果中奖了。”,it indicates you buy One ticket. You'd better use 几张 to indicate that you bought several tickets. I am not saying you are wrong by 买了些彩票, but in practice, 些 is often used to describe uncountable nouns. For example, 我买了一些水果。这些事情。说些什么? you can say '昨天晚上买了彩票', which conveys the fact/behavior itself you bought some/a lottery ticket(s) (how ...


2

in 那年夏天 那年 is an attributive (定语)modifying or restricting the noun 夏天, it seems the phrase can be expanded to 那年的夏天, 那个夏天 is without this attributive,instead the noun 夏天 is preceded by the demonstrative pronoun 那,demonstrative pronouns 这,那 like numerals according to grammar rules require measure words,but in the case of 这 and 那 are often omitted,so ...


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