7

我们 and 我們 are same, except 们 is simplified character, and 們 is traditional character. See this for more details: Simplified Chinese characters


6

This is discussed extensively in this thread: http://forum.reviewingthehanzi.com/viewtopic.php?id=7698 A quote Because the "simplified" version of this character was made PRC standard when the new character lists were published. Even though nothing was actually simplified. There was a committee in China tasked with simplifying and standardizing ...


5

No. It became a variant way earlier than that. There may well have been a document to that effect in 1995, but it would not have been anything new. It is well established that 劵 and 券 were two different seal scripts characters, as @HenryHO points out. However, according to Qing Dynasty linguist Tuan Yu-tsai's annotated version of Shuo-wen Chieh-Tzu: 【清·...


5

some tidbits as i known, or heard: calligraphy must be in traditional chinese, no matter in which scripts (cursive, regular, or seal) so, signboards, billboards could be in traditional chinese, such as: it used “報”, instead of “报”; anyway, it’s mr mao’s handwriting 🙀 no one dares to change it classical / literary text should not be changed into ...


3

From a Unicode perspective it is the same character. Depending on the font and the environment you are using it may look different. Take for instance a look at the code charts of Unicode 12: As can be seen above the Chinese and Japanese tend to write the same character slightly differently. If you check what font and language that is used on Duolingo, you ...


2

I'm afraid that the other answer missed the point here - the font that Duolingo displays is a East Asian Gothic typeface, which is a derivative of Ming Typeface. Gothic and Ming are print typefaces, and you don't use them to imitate handwriting (orthography, as specified in the question). Yes, your Duolingo does indeed show a Japanese or Korean printing font,...


2

Every major input method software used by Chinese people has a simplified/traditional switch button. I use simplified words in my daily life but totally accept traditional words and the people who like to write with traditional words. but if you are writing formal documents, simplified words are much better.


2

Yes, it is allowable for unofficial occasions, at least in Mainland region. However, such preference might lead to criticism from some Internet users. In principle, this is nobody's business except for the one adopt this typing convention, but there always be somebody jump out and berate him/her for being too condescending hence felt "deeply offended&...


2

I have finally managed to locate the document and the forum thread that lead me to it: http://www.china-language.gov.cn/wenziguifan/managed/003.htm User pts posted the best comments on the Skritter thread "刀/力 recognition" from November 2011: 1. 券 [quàn] means tickets or bonds. This one is easy. zdic.net defines 劵 [juàn] as 倦 (tired, exhausted). In the ...


1

In ancient time Chinese people were creating new characters. Now they don't. Only new chemical elements create new character. What are the rules, what is not allowed, what is allowed? 六書造字原則 is one of the rules. Who is allowed to create one? How do you associate a sound with it too? Is it free to create your own? As far as I know, empirer and his ...


1

Taking the character 呣 for instance, we can have things like: m̄ 叹词, 表示疑问。如:呣, 你说什么?(汉语大词典) ḿ 歎詞﹐用法同嗯﹐表示疑問﹑不以為然或出乎意外:呣﹐他去幹甚麼?(Longman’s) m̀ 歎詞﹐用法同嗯﹐表示答應﹑應諾:呣﹐我這就去。(Longman’s) There is also record of a neutral toned 呣: m 叹词, 表示应诺。如:呣, 我知道了。(汉语大词典) —— 嗯 similarly can give us things like: ń ň ǹ


1

Interesting question. There are some dictionaries (e.g. this and this) that list this character: 呣 m2 or m4 as being an onomatopoeic word used to express a humming sound one makes when thinking. And yes, that would be an "m" sound with 2nd or 4th tone. I recall having seen other sources listing also 呒 m2, even though this is also used some times as a ...


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