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0

你好!今天运动了吗? Hi! Done any training today? 来打卡吧。 Let's go! (一节腿 doesn't make much sense, must be a nickname) (一节腿)昨天忘记打卡了。 (Nickname) forgot to stamp his card yesterday. 补上, 哈哈! (Have to) Make up for it, haha! 三亚是著名的旅游打卡地。 Sanya is a famous tourist resort.


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打卡:post on the internet about finishing a routine, such as work out, study, or any habits that take effort to keep. 打卡 originated from work locations that have card machines to record time you get to work and leave. So 打卡 originally means finished a day's work. Your boss will supervise you, to check if you 打了卡 or not. If not, you'll get some punishment. ...


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originally, one need to “punch in” (打卡/咭) for recording the time of one's arrival or beginning work. such “punch in” are supposed to be done by oneself, not by others. so, 打卡 Pikes Peak the girl went to pikes peak, and took a selfies. which implied she actually was there, no cheating by photoshop. then, it derives to “record it by photo”, “in person”, etc ...


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打卡 swipe the card, which is used as a proof that you have get on/off the work on time. Now, it's been used on internet posts to mean that they record something to proof that they have been somewhere or done something as if they take it as seriously as they do their jobs. Basically, it's fair to say that 打卡 means to record sth (as a proof).


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I believe that the CC-CEDICT definitions may help: MDBG 打卡 dǎ​kǎ (Tw) (on Facebook) to check in to a location Wiktionary also has a helpful entry: (chiefly Taiwan, Internet slang) to check in (to a location) on social media Facebook has a “check-in” function, where people can add their location to a post to tell people they're at a specific place. For ...


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Oh the mysteries of 了! What is 了 doing in ‘这个表快了五分钟。’? Not much, you can leave it out: "这个表快五分钟。" just like 芸香科橙子同学 above said. I wouldn't even notice a difference in the mood of the sentence with or without 了。I'd get that from the tone of voice.


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General discussion of the perfective 了 I think I managed to understand this use of 了 in Charles N. Li, Sandra A. Thompson. Mandarin Chinese: A Functional Reference Grammar. There, they argue the perfective 了 signals an event with a perfective action, which is regarded as completely "bounded" either temporally, spatially or conceptually by the ...


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见马克思 probably only works in China. 见阎王 or 去世了 is much more common. 去世了 is more formal and respectful. There is another very interesting sentence(slang) to describe someone has dead. 他去蘇州賣鴨蛋了。 (Translate "DIRECTLY" -> "He goes to Suzhou selling duck eggs." Suzhou is a city in Jiangsu province in China.)


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I have a feeling that 百年之後 suite your need. 百年之後 have ambiguous meaning when you don't know primary meaning of this component. It can be interpreted differently between interpreting it literally and considering the meaning in addition to its literal meaning. When we interpret 百年之後 literally. We get 百年 means "a hundred year." 之後 means "after&...


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Is this phrase really known/recognizable by an average Chinese person? No. This expression is understandable (given a clear context), but it's rarely used and very informal. If not, are there any better phrases with ambiguous meanings? Yes, there are a lot. I think @River just gave a really good example: 他走了 could mean he has left or he has passed away, ...


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Sohu has a news article dated from 2020-07-26, with a sentence that reads: 腮部中弹,离大脑很近了,稍有不慎,杨勇恐怕就提前去见马克思了。 Here “见马克思” is used to mean “to die,” like what was mentioned in the question above. The phrase in question is featured in a recent write-up by a large company that services the Chinese speaking world. I think it is fair to say that it is well known ...


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No. The baseline is, the term "见马克思" is rarely used today. If used, usually not in a serious situation. It might also be found in historical texts or literature that reviews the points of view during that historical period. Polite ways of mentioning people's death are: 他去世了 he left the world 他过世了 he passed the world 他不在了 he is not here anymore 他走了 ...


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EDIT: As mentioned by @dan and others, now I believe the correct answer is we need 是 in the sentence to change the meaning of 应该: 应该 should (requirement) → 应该是 should be ~ might be (possibility). Discussion for the role of 是 in the sentence without 应该: After consulting with the book Charles N. Li, Sandra A. Thompson, Mandarin Chinese: A Functional ...


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Some one: 你今天怎么了? Me sniffling: 我可能感冒了。 vs Some one: 你是不是感冒了? Me: 我应该是感冒了。 Add "是" when someone has referred to a specific state (catch a cold). You can also add "是" to emphasize the correct state if the answer is no. e.g. Some one: 你弟弟今天是不是发烧了? Me: 不,但他应该是感冒了。 Note: it seems unnatural to me if the "是" in "我应该是感冒了" is ...


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Depends on the the stress. If the stress falls on "是", "是" could be translated as "do" for a double positive. For example, I DO want a PS5. If the stress falls on other words, the "是" could be transaled as "be" simply.


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"是" here gives the reader a sense of "文绉绉", and has more literariness. We don't use it that way in spoken chinese. But It's very common in literature. For a sentence, Shorter(without "是") means more efficient, like a soldier, and longer(with "是") means more emotional, like a literary writer. On the other hand, our ...


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“是” express that the speaker believe he is having a cold. The sentence translated into English should be "I must be having a cold" or "I believe I'm having a cold". If without “是”, it turns out to be expressing "I should catch a cold". It doesn't make sense since nobody wants to catch a cold.


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是 is used to denote something is true. 是[component 1]. Where [component 1] is true. For example, 他是睡著了(他是[component 1], where [component 1] is 睡著了)(He has fallen asleep.) Because [component 1] is true, 睡著了(has fallen asleep) is true. We get 他是睡著了 means "He has fallen asleep." 應該 is used to denote something is possibly true. 應該[component 2]. Where [...


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应该是 here denotes the sense of infer; conjecture; guess; reckoning:. That's why it has been translated as "I think I caught a cold". 是 itself denotes this sense: 1  联系两种事物。 表示解释或描述 人家是丰年,我们是歉年 /刘老师是近视眼。 Basically, 是 links to things. The latter explains or describes the former. In your case, 感冒了(got cold) explains or describes that 我 is in what ...


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Let's simplify the sentence to make it easier to identify the role of 是 他死了 -- he died 他(是)死了 -- he (indeed) died 我输了 -- I lost 我(是)输了 -- I (indeed) lost ~ Adding 应该 make it complicated 应该 in 我应该 means "should" 应该 in 我应该是 means "probably be" Example: 我应该输了 -- I should lose 我应该(是)输了 -- I probably (really) have lost It is hard to apply ...


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I do not agree that 是 is acting as the copula in the sentence. Because even without 是, the following sentences contain the same meaning and only differ in tone: 我应该是感冒了 我应该感冒了 This answer comes after reading 「是」,「的」與動詞名物化 by professor 石定栩 of PolyU in Hong Kong. (The title roughly translate to: 是, 的, and Normalization of Verb) 感冒 should be acting as a verb ...


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我应该是感冒了 I must have caught a cold The verb 是 is the copula. It's used to express that the subject 我 has the qualities expressed by the predicative clause 感冒了。 Now, as many other Chinese words, 感冒 doesn't have a very clear-cut grammatical role. It can be either a verb or a noun, depending on the context. What's important to note is that 感冒 can be a verbal ...


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是 is the copula in Mandarin. It conveys the meaning of the verb “to be”, but is not conjugated, since Mandarin is an analytic language and makes use of marker words to express ideas like grammatical tenses. A 是 B means A is B, where B is something which describes A. 是 also “affirms” the asserted relationship between A and B. 中文:我-应该-是-感冒-了 English: [I]-[...


0

In English, “你怎么了” means what's going on? or what happened to you?


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It means the person who says this wants to just give up arguing. It can be translated as: "Well, whatever" (accompanied by a shrug, or polite smile)


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We use 怎麼了 to express "what happened?" This happened when people find something wrong or expect something happened and want to know whether or not there is something wrong or something happened, or what wrong or what happened. For example, 怎麼了 妳累了 in this Mandarin song 說好的幸福呢. In this example there was something expected to happened or something ...


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怎麼了 Interjection: What happened?; What's wrong? 你看起来很沮丧,怎么了? (You look depressed, what's up?) Depend on context '你怎么了?' could mean 'What happened to you?' or 'What's wrong with you?' Examples: 你怎么了?第三节才到学校。 - What happened to you? Came to school only when it was already the third period. 半天也找不到你,你怎么了? - I can't find you for half a day, what happened to ...


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This dictionary definition addresses this use of 怎么: 作谓语,询问状况 你怎么啦? / 今天怎么了,那么多人迟到? Basically, it's used as predicate, denoting what's going on with someone or something.


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你怎么了? 说话声音这么小! Here, the person who asks infers that the person has some problems, such as sickness, sadness, etc., through some special behaviors of the person being asked (low voice). In other words, the first person already thinks that something bad has happened to the second person. He wants to know what is bad and cares about him. The response of "...


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It's one of those fixed expressions whose otherwise regular meaning is significantly and conspicuously altered by the modal 了, that introduces change semantics. The phrase 「你怎么(样)~」 in itself means "How do you...?". If you add a modal 了 signifying change, it becomes: "How do you... now" (as opposed to before) ...which in an idiomatic ...


1

Both sound idiomatic and can be used interchangeably, but both can bring more or less confusion without context. Two ways to understand those sentences : "I've seen his movie (from the beginning to the end) entirely"; "I've seen entirely (all of) his movies". (here 電影 is considered as a plural) This confusion can be solved in either way:...


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The meaning of this sentence is very vague. My mother tongue is Chinese, but without the help of context, I have no idea what it means. Even if there is a context, there may be a deviation in understanding. This person is not very good at expressing his ideas, or deliberately speaking very vague. The expression of smiling face has the meaning of being angry ...


0

"Damn, whatever the f*** you say, I'll take it... I guess" Said with a cynical voice.


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Could be two meanings you decide (more likely) implying you are too dominating (less likely) it also depends on what kind of smiley emoji they send you. If it's a "slightly smile" emoji, than it raises a red alarm.


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The whole meaning of the pattern 说什么是什么 varies according to contexts. In (a), this pattern means someone is honest; in (b), it means the speaker is forced by authority to agree. a. 我们不是那心口两样的人,说什么是什么。 b. 您官大一品,您说什么是什么 。 In terms of cognitive semantics, its core meaning description is that the potential event expressed by 说什么 could be fulfilled by the act ...


1

You two may have a disscusion, and that people said this to you ? Most time , this people is too tired to argue with you. also see: 千万不要和傻子争论,你就和他说你说的对就行了。他就会心满意足的走了


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I think Pedroski got it right. "你说什么是什么" = "你说什么(就)是什么。" = "Whatever you say (, then whatever it will be)." "你说什么(就)是什么。" can be used literally. For example "主席说你是人民公敌,你(就)是人民公敌" - The chairman said you are the enemy of the people, (then) you are the enemy of the people. In most cases, it is used ...


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你说什么是什么。 The sentence usually is used when someone disagree with you or they don't know the right answer and whether you said is true or not, but they don't want to argue with you probably because they think it's useless or they feel they can do nothing to influence your decision or believe. It could be something like believe or do whatever you said because ...


1

Like you said, your friend's sentence might be to convey: "Whatever you say is what you say, I won't complain/disagree." I guess it'll depend on context, like what the conversation is about etc. Did he/she reply to an answer, etc. According to this article, the smiley emoji can mean something else: https://www.techinasia.com/smiley-face-emoji-...


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Maybe you mean: 你说什么就是什么。 You decide.


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我把他的电影从头到尾看了一遍。 Is more idiomatic. 从头到尾 applies to 电影 我从头到尾把他的电影看了一遍。 Here 从头到尾 applies to 我,which is strange. Nevertheless, colloquially people can still understand both expressions equally well.


1

Short answer: "从头到尾" and "把他的电影" are two adverbs having the equal weight, so you can put either one first. Detailed answer: To analysis a chinese sentence, is very important to know the basic structure: 主语 + 谓语 + 宾语. 主语 includes the "形容词" ( adjective, which decorates the 主语 ) 谓语 includes the "副词" ( adverb, ...


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1.我 [从头到尾] 把他的电影看了一遍。 2.我把他的电影 [从头到尾] 看了一遍。 Both are idiomatic. [从头到尾] is an adverbial phrase that can be placed before or after the object [他的电影]. Just like the two sentences above. In either case, the adverbial phrase must be placed before the verb phrase [看了一遍] #1 place the adverbial phrase before the object. It emphasizes the adverbial phrase [从头到尾](...


1

我从头到尾把他的电影看了一遍 是把他所有电影全都看了一遍,定义很清晰。 我把他的电影从头到尾看了一遍 是我把他某一部电影从头到尾看了一遍,并且有把他的电影全都看完了的模糊的含义


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