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13

After a bit of searching I could not find a proper resource to answer this question, so I started compiling compiled a comprehensive list by hand. Since you say that the most common character for each initial+final+tone combination is enough for you, the answer is rather easy: we can cross-reference the pinyin and tone combinations with a list of character ...


5

This is probably a better question for linguistics stack exchange; however, I will say that you are not hearing things incorrectly. My background is in linguistics, though not specifically in phonetics and phonology, so don't consider this an expert opinion. However, given some searching, I've found a helpful Wikipedia (Glides section) note on this: The ...


5

I think the premise of the question is problematic. Pinyin was not created to teach the sounds of Mandarin to second language learners, so the question of why it is in a certain way that happens to be problematic for second language learners does not have an answer. For native speaker, there's no problem using "i" for three completely different ...


5

Hanyu Pinyin does not have a 1:1 mapping between written symbols (letters) and pronunciation, and so can't be said to be accurate in the sense that IPA (the International Phonetic Alphabet) is meant to be accurate. It is of course perfectly functional as a way of writing down Mandarin pronunciation, but only if you know how to pronounce the language first or ...


4

I just came across this Chinese Pinyin Table in archchinese.com, which might be able to help you: Pressing on any pinyin combination, for example ma (in red), and selecting [Characters...]: We arrive to a page where, at the top, we have the characters corresponding to this pinyin syllable (this is the information @blackgreen gave on his answer, though ...


3

In pinyin erhua is usually written with a natural tone: r 哪儿, like you mentioned above, for example is written: nǎr Erhua is tacked on to the end of the pinyin and the tone is in the usual place for the preceding character. An easier way to see this is probably for a word like 瓶儿. 瓶儿 is written: píngr The erhua is not merged into the pinyin (like you ...


3

Origin of Pinyin characters Pinyin inherits many of its orthographic choices from earlier romanisations of Chinese, namely the Gwoyeu Romatzyh, Latinxua Sin Wenz (and zhuyin for diacritics). The b/p, d/t, g/k distinction for aspirated/unaspirated consonants is inherited from this, and was likely chosen by analogy to them being voiced/unvoiced.1 The other ...


3

Most of foreigners use emphasized text "Tao Te Ching". Of course, it's not in Mandarin Chinese Pinyin, but in old Chinese Pinyin. It is very common, such as Peking and Sun Yat-sen. And, how to write it in Mandarin Chinese Pinyin? Rules: There should be a space between two words what mean different. 《现代汉语词典》 Xiàndài Hànyǔ Cídiǎn 《毛主席语录》 Mao Zhuxi ...


3

Although Wade–Giles uses -ien, Zhuyin (1910) uses ㄧㄢ -ian, Gwoyeu Romatzyh (1926) has -ian for the basic form of first tone, Latinxua Sin Wenz (1931) has -ian, and Yale romanization (1943) uses -yan. Likewise, pinyin's usage of -üan instead of -üen for [yɛn] has precedence in Wade–Giles (1892) -üan, Zhuyin ㄩㄢ -üan, Latinxua Sin Wenz yan, and Yale ywan. Yale ...


3

(y)i, (w)u "High vowel" / "glide + analogous-high-vowel" are non-contrasting in Standard Chinese, and can be pronounced either way: Chinese also lacks the contrast between V and GV, or VC and GVC, where V is a high vowel and G is the corresponding glide, such as the pairs in (30). The Phonology of Standard Chinese, 3.7 Allophonic ...


3

The // is the marker used by Pleco to indicate that the word is in a special class of intransitive verbs called separable verbs. Other references call these V.O. (Verb Object) constructions. ABC dictionary gives a useful TL;DR summary: V.O. (Verb-Object Construction, Dòng-Bīn Jiégòu 动宾结构). Many English verbs get translated into natural Chinese as a verb ...


2

I must say that the differences are not negligible to Chinese people, because they won't have a "sh" followed by "w", and that's not the same problem as "where ya goin". To your first problem, I think it's because you're still not skilled enough to pronounce "x" (because this consonant is absent in English, French, and ...


2

Please check out this article. It has been decided in 1920 that it should be bo not buo , fo not fuo, and so on. http://blog.udn.com/wangtao/7517887 Excerpt from the article follows: 「ㄅㄛ、ㄆㄛ、ㄇㄛ、ㄈㄛ的注音符號裡面沒有ㄨ,為什麼許多人發音的時候都有 ㄨ呢?」這是除了ㄈㄥ之外,另一個常見的發音問題。 要解釋這個疑問,只要看民國九年十二月「國語統一籌備會」所撰〈修正《國音字 典》之說明〉(收錄於商務印書館出版《校改國音字典》書末)即可知其梗概: 唇音各聲母與韻母拼合,原案根據韻書,有用開口呼之韻母者,有用合口呼之韻母 者,如「剝」...


2

An idea coming from here suggests to take the HSK vocabulary list annotated with pinyin and put the words list to Google translate. The post's author found 11% of words incorrectly converted for HSK level 1-3 words. The issue is that the official HSK website provides only a words-list without pinyin in an excel format. However, you can find respectively here ...


2

Yes, pinyin is an accurate guide to pronunciation in general, but exceptions exist. An example is that two consecutive words with the 3rd intotation 第三声 are usually pronounced with the first word having 2nd intonation instead. This phenomenon is known as 变调 (literally: change in intotation, also known as tone sandhi). For instance, the adjective “小小”, with ...


2

As far as I can hear, Chinese pronounce "yi", "yu" and "wu" most times as [i], [ü] and [u], except sometimes in combination with a preceding syllable (like in "suoyi"). This is the reason, I think, why Mandarin speakers have problems in distinguishing between the pronunciation of e.g. English "east" and "...


2

Your question is answered here by user Shun in Pleco Forums: [T]his is a feature of the free Pleco dictionary. As you have correctly guessed, it indicates that other characters can sometimes be inserted where the two slashes (//) are, because the verbs have a V-O etymology. They only appear if the Pleco dictionary is configured as the first dictionary in ...


2

It's a verb-object collocation. 坐 in Chinese means sit/sitting, and 牢 in Chinese means prison. In Chinese, we add adj between the verb and object, like: 坐过两年牢. Extending: 坐椅子 = Sitting on a chair 坐镇 = personally attend to garrison duty; assume personal command(A great man is awe-inspiring even if he's just sitting there) 坐诊 = providing medical service(...


2

TL;DR: You need a bigger vocabulary to increase reading proficiency. Based on your comments, it sounds like you know a lot of vocabulary (perhaps orally), but you have trouble recognizing those characters in writing. So, instead of a bigger vocabulary, you need to increase your character recognition. Point #3 below + Anki will help you do that. ...


2

撇 is pronounced as piē when it means 'to cast away' (as in 撇下兒女) or 'to scoop off' (as in 撇油). Note it is a verb in both cases. 撇 is pronounced as piě when it means 'left-downward stroke' (as a noun in 撇捺), 'to throw (horizontally)' (as in 撇磚頭), or 'to incline' (outwards, as in 八字腳向外撇). 撇嘴 literally means to incline the ends of the lips downwards, usually ...


1

IMHO, there are two reasons. In general, Chinese people tend to pronounce every Chinese character in one syllable (每个字听起来像一个音节) with similar length, which will cause the "word initial glide", like 'y' and 'w'. That makes you find different pronunciations between learning Pinyin and actual chinese characters. Examples: "王" If you separate ...


1

The letters w and y are just an orthographic convention. Syllables starting with u are written as w in place of u (e.g., *uan is written as wan). Standalone u is written as wu. Syllables starting with i are written as y in place of i (e.g., *ian is written as yan). Standalone i is written as yi. Syllables starting with ü are written as yu in place of ü (e.g.,...


1

Looks like it is le5 for neutral tone.


1

That is the problem of TyperRacer, not the IME or you. I suggest you using platforms created by Chinese speaking people, which could be optimized for Chinese practice. For example https://dazi.kukuw.com/keyboard.html


1

元音有韵,辅音无韵。is a fundamental phonetic concept. Since HYPY barrowed English alphabets as its symbols, it should stick to the separation of the "names" of the letters and the pronunciation of the letters in spelling. The name of letter "b" is "bee", but the pronunciation is very short bursting solid sound of both lips, without any ...


1

1, You can use the software "Auto-hot-key" Create a script and add the following lines [::「 ]::」 Run the scripts. When you type [ on the keyboard it will be 「. When you type ] it will be 」. This solution will work regardless of Input Methods. This is neat and the most recommended solution. You can also use different hotkeys, with or without ...


1

Since your story background is in ancient China, expressions such as 我的小鬼 seems to be inappropriate. If you're considering making the story in Classical Chinese, the following words may be helpful: Calling a younger brother: When both are young, the older can call the younger by his nickname/infant name; When grown up, the older should call his younger ...


1

My Little Ghost: 我的小鬼: Wǒ de xiǎoguǐ


1

To find pinyin for the lyrics, just input it in Google Translate Example: At Google Translate: 多看一眼 多看一眼 Duō kàn yīyǎn If you don't have the lyrics, search Google for 多看一眼 歌词 and you will get it here 鳳飛飛 多看一眼 作詞:莊奴/ 作曲:湯尼 青山高 綠水長 藍天白雲好風光 芳草綠 鮮花香 比不上可愛的好姑娘 眼睛大 明又亮 神情好像水蕩漾 身材美 健又壯 烏黑的頭髮飄肩上 你看她一眼 一輩子都在想 她看你一眼 一輩子不會忘 誰不愛 好姑娘 美麗溫柔又大方 你若是 真愛她 緊緊的跟在她身旁 Also, ...


1

When devising a writing system to represent the sounds of a specific language, e.g. pinyin for Mandarin Chinese, there is no need to have one symbol representing only one sound. In my very first phonology class, we were given an example in English. Voiceless stops /p/ /t/ /k/ are aspirated at the beginning of a syllable, but become unaspirated when they are ...


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