34

the "俄" part seems to have no corresponding phoneme, either in Russian or any of the other language I have looked up. Yes it's peculiar in Chinese. It's related to the Mongolian. Reference: 郭文深.俄罗斯国家名称变迁考——从“罗刹”到“俄罗斯” Summarize it in short: From Yuan Dynasty, the Mongolian translated 罗斯 as oros (but not ros) followed by the Mongolian pronunciation habit, ...


22

This is actually not one character, but a stylistic conglomeration of the characters in the phrase 招財進寶, meaning "ushering in wealth and prosperity". The characters 財 and 寶 end up being represented with the same 貝 component in this "character". While the left side of 招 (扌) and the right side of 財 (才) are technically not the same component, they look similar ...


18

None of the other answers are really relevant to the question asked. The poster asks WHY the word 的 is sometimes pronounced "di"; not when and how you use it. And saying that "some people just do it" is not an answer, it's a tautology. The true reason why there are many distinct pronunciations is a historical/cultural phenomenon called 文白异读 (literary-...


18

Linguists divide pre-modern Chinese broadly into two periods: Old Chinese and Middle Chinese. I wanted to preface my answer by noting that Bernhard Karlgren used the term "Ancient Chinese" to refer specifically to Middle Chinese, and it appears that your questions seem to be referring to Middle Chinese as well, though I will be making a note about Old ...


17

First, the de/di phenomenon is not 文白异读 (literary-colloquial distinct readings). The term "文白异读 (literary-colloquial distinct readings)" have strict academic definition. Not every homograph is 文白异读 (literary-colloquial distinct readings). Not every literary-colloquial distinction is 文白异读 (literary-colloquial distinct readings). Books on Chinese phonology ...


17

For beginner level: I have some children's textbooks with short stories / poems (around 20 - 50 characters). Chinese children in years 1/2 spend time practicing by reciting these short stories until they get them perfect. Here is an example of the first lesson from the school text book: 一片一片又一片,两片三片四五片,六片七片八九片,香山红叶红满天 Yīpiàn yīpiàn yòu yīpiàn, ...


16

The standard Chinese dictionary (《现代汉语词典》) lists xuè (fourth, not third, tone) as the official pronunciation and xiě as a colloquial variant. As such, in most compounds and technical terms, xuè is preferred. The pronunciation xiě is acceptable when you just want to say "blood" in casual speech. There are several exceptions: the two modifiers 血糊糊 (xiěhūhū, "...


16

There is no single way to pronounce a given letter in the Latin alphabet. The set of rules varies wildly depending on the speaker's geographical location. That being said however, I have, a few years ago, compiled a list of common (more Northern I believe) pronunciations of Roman letters. You can find it on this subpage of my Wiktionary homepage: Roman ...


16

Voicing and Aspiration Stop consonants can fall into the following categories (roughly): Voiced stops: Vocal chords start vibrating before stop is released. E.g., English "b" as in "bat" (/bæt/ in IPA), French "b" as in "bon" = /bɔ̃/. Unvoiced unaspirated stops: Vocal chords start vibrating almost exactly when stop is released. E.g., Chinese "b" as in "bu" ...


15

I suggest you pronounce it like the "r" sound in "brrrrrrrr I'm cold" or "grrrrrrrr I'm angry". So for Japan you could do it like "rrrrrrr ben". Don't roll this "r" sound. This will get you about 80% accuracy. To get the rest you need to make the same voiced palato-alveolar sibilant, then you will be there. Just want to add the palato-alveolar sibilant ...


15

For people to understand better...


14

'x' is an alveolo-palatal fricative, while 'sh' is a retroflex fricative. For retroflex 'sh', the tip of the tongue is curled up toward the roof of the mouth while the tongue body is low. Mandarin 'sh' could be similar to Russian 'ш'. Start with this wikipedia image of a retroflex stop, but make a slight space for air to pass above the tongue: For alveolo-...


14

The same happens with other characters with the same "finals": 就 - Jiù 扭 - Niǔ etc... From this page of Chinesepod.com: Mandarin's iu sound can confuse you because what is written is actually an abbreviated form of "iou," a straightforward combination of the vowel sounds i and ou. Thus the iu syllable sounds similar to the "yo" of the English word "yo-...


12

Yes, for example these characters are taken from a Chinese grammar textbook: There are obviously others, but as you can see, it's possible to guess the pronunciation. In other cases, according to the radicals, you can understand if they refer to a certain "topic", for example, the third one in that list is the radical for "water", the last one is the ...


12

Have you tried practicing with tongue twisters (绕口令)? They can help with both listening and pronunciation. Repetition is really the only way to go if you want to master pronunciation. Here are a few to try: (My personal favorite.) 吃葡萄不吐葡萄皮 不吃葡萄倒吐葡萄皮 四是四 十是十 十四是十四 四十是四十 四十四是四十四 四十四隻石獅子是死的 老师是四十四,是不是? 梨和泥 ...


12

The rule that applies to sentences also applies to names, that is for a sentence of sequential 3rd tone characters, (Optionally) Split it to phrases by functional groups. For each group, every other character is read as 2nd tone while keeping the last character 3rd tone. 2.1. If a group has even number of characters, the tones become 2,3,...,2,3,2,3. 2.2. ...


12

What the online community thinks From Baidu 百科: 准确读音 xià zài   “下载”这个词,规范读音按照现代汉语词典、现代汉语规范词典等权威字典的标注应为“xià zài”。随着电脑的普及,这个词使用的频率越来越高,但可惜的是绝大多数人一开口就是从网上“xià zǎi”,就连播音员、主持人也读“xià zǎi”,如央视的晚间新闻在播送“网络侵权BT下载”时就读成“xià zǎi”。可以说电台、电视台的播音员、节目主持人对“xià zǎi”这个错误的读音起了推波助澜的作用。就目前的趋势来看,要推广“下载”的正确读音已非常困难,已经习非成是了。这些现象给人一种感觉,好像电台、电视台的播音员、节目主持人的发音很随意,...


12

Here are some different things that I have seen that has helped people pick up tones: Starting out Most books use graphs which show how each of the tones rise, fall, flatten etc (example here). It helps some people to see the difference visually and the graphs show how great an extent the tones differ. The tones also have names (not official) e.g. rising, ...


12

“俄罗斯”不是从英文或俄文来的。可能是从蒙古文Oros来的。 在中国元明朝时称俄罗斯族为“罗斯”或“罗刹国”.当时蒙古族人用蒙语拼读俄文“ROCIA”时,在“R”前面加一个元音.因此,“ROCIA”就成了“OROCCIA”.满清政府时,蒙语的“OROCCIA”转译成汉语时,就成了“俄罗斯”. The name of "Éluósī" does not come from English or Russian. It may come from Mongolian Oros. During the Chinese Yuan and Ming dynasties the Russian ethnic group was called "Luósī" or "Luóchàguó". At that time as ...


11

Actually, such a problem even upsets native speakers, like me. When I was a student, I had to memorize the words for different pronunciatons too. Unfortunately,there are some characters with two different pronunciations when used in colloquial language (白读) and literary language (文读), while different pronunciations basically mean the same. See the article ...


11

So time for an update… If you want to play by the books, biang is not a permissible syllable. If you are concerned with what comes out of a speaker’s mouth, syllables like nim (contraction of 你們) are even possible, although they are technically surface realizations of a phonology that does not allow such syllables. The surprising fact is that iang as a ...


11

The only correct answer is "TA MA DE". This is the equivalent version of "F**K" in Chinese. I never hear people pronounce as "Di". Thinking it in other way, it will be too soft and feminine if it's pronounced as "Di". It supposed to be strong and speak with hatred.


11

一 in 一线 has two kinds of tones, and two corresponding meanings: yi1 xian4 (1st tone), means front line / 1st line, such as 一线城市 (first-tier city), 亲临一线, 一线队. yi2 xian4 (2nd tone), means a gleam of / a ray of, such as 一线光明, 一线生机. Basically, before the word with 4th tone, 一 should be pronounced as the 2nd tone (“一”的音变), such as 一样, 一辈子. But if it is used as ...


11

There have been conflicting claims on whether the second tone and the "raised third tone" are distinct, but according to Jerry Norman's 1988 book, Chinese, "Perceptual tests done by Dreher and Lee (1966) and Wang and Li (1967) established that native speakers are unable to make a consistent distinction between second tones and raised third tones" (147). So ...


11

In most cases, we cannot pick one of different pronunciations arbitrarily. The reason is very simple. If we can, we do not have to pronounce differently. Right? DICT.TW 線上字典 can give you the commnon definitions in English. 資料來源: MDBG CC-CEDICT Chinese-English Dictionary 漢英字典 要 [ㄧㄠˋ; yao4] important vital to want will ...


10

一 is pronounced in the first tone when it stands alone. It is pronounced in the fourth tone when it precedes a first, second, or third tone. However, it is pronounced in the second tone when it precedes a fourth tone. 不 is a bit similar: It is also pronounced in the fourth tone when it precedes a first, second, or third tone. However, it is pronounced in the ...


10

臵 (U+81F5) [ gé | ㄍㄜˊ ] From 《康熙字典》: 《集韻》「各額」切,音「格」。與「𢓜」同。「至」也。 Same as 𢓜. It means "to arrive" or "to go to". 又《六書原》徦,俗作臵。 The original or formal form of 徦. 徦 (U+5FA6) [ jiǎ | ㄐㄧㄚˇ ] 1. 至;到。(to arrive; to go to) 2. 來。(to come) 3. 姓。(surname)


9

I wouldn't have believed you unless I checked it myself, but it appears these are both interchangeable with one source claiming: http://www.askbennychinese.com/questions/detail/3713 In fact, in the south of China, people says “yīn wèi”, while in the north people say “yīn wéi”. The only difference lies in the pronunciation. Basically, they are exactly ...


9

As recorded in Baidu, this unique pronunciation of “和” as "hàn" actually originates from the Old Beijing dialect. Extracted from the blog article titled 台湾人为嘛把“和”读作hàn?, it says the following: 1945年10月台湾光复,日语的“国语”黯然退出,台胞急着要回复祖国的语文,要说国语,要认汉字。 1946年4月2日台湾省国语推行委员会正式成立。台湾国语会的标志性贡献是编订《国音标准汇编》,作为推行标准国语的根据。1946年5月1日起,由“老北京”齐铁根先生每日在清晨7时,在电台担任“国语读音示范”,播讲民众国语读本、...


9

Yep, they do As you can find on the great and all knowing wiki, the word for tea in most languages comes from the Chinese: Cognate to Min tê: English tea Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian, and Swedish te Finnish and Estonian tee French thé German Tee Greek τέϊον Hebrew תה Indonesian and Malay teh A great many others Cognate to Mandarin chá: Greek τσάι ...


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