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Brief Answers Is it indeed the case that the lower component of 䏍 is different from the lower component of 青? Yes in the etymology sense (the lower component of 䏍 is 肉, and the lower component of 青 is 丹), but it's not necessary to distinguish them in your hand writing – though, maybe some teachers, especially those in Taiwan, encourage you to do so – you ...


16

Brief Answer Q1. The Wiktionary list of characters with the 冫 radical contains the following two characters: 冬, 冭. Where in these characters is the 冫? Are the two lines at the bottom supposed to be the ice radical? Answer: You're right. That's true. Q2. When I look at the entry for 永 in the Chinese dictionary app on my phone (Pleco), then it says that it'...


14

Same meaning: 崕 = 崖 (ㄧㄚˊ / yá) = cliff; precipice 峰 = 峯 (ㄈㄥ / fēng) = peak; summit 毗 = 毘 (ㄆㄧˊ / pí) = to adjoin; to border on 群 = 羣 (ㄑㄩㄣˊ / qún) = group; crowd 飃 = 飄 (ㄆㄧㄠ / piāo) = to float 鄰 = 隣 (ㄌㄧㄣˊ / lín) = neighbor; adjacent Different meanings: 早 (ㄗㄠˇ / zǎo) = early; morning 旪 (ㄒㄧㄝˊ / xié) = 協 = agreement 吟 (ㄧㄣˊ / yín) = to chant; to recite 含 (...


12

Is this discrepancy above due to a calligraphical mistake or lazyness, namely, leaving off that one tick, made a long time ago? TL;DR: I don't think so, because (1) 尸 used as the pictographic radical with the meaning house in 屋 was explicitly mentioned in 说文解字 long before, (2) the original meanings of 尸 and 户 used as radicals are not exactly the same (house ...


12

How to look up an entry in 《說文通訓定聲》? 前言 Introduction 一般中文字典的內容是按部首字形分類排列。 《說文通訓定聲》則是依音韻分類排列。 從內容順序來看,作者 朱駿聲 是假設讀者已熟悉字的音韻。 所以,他先列出自創的「古韻十八部」做為「總目」,然後才是各部的內容。 The contents of common Chinese dictionaries are classified and arranged according to the shapes of radicals. 《說文通訓定聲》 is arranged in accordance with phonology. Judging from the order of contents, the ...


12

Things that contain「寺」may be written with「士」in the Taiwanese standard, while other regions (Mainland China, Hong Kong, Korea, and Japan) use「土」. The decomposition listed on that page is based on the Taiwanese standard, but the handwriting animation is based on the Mainland Chinese standard. If you're not learning Chinese from specifically Taiwan, write it ...


11

TL;DR : 饣 is the phonetic, not the signific. 饣, which is simplified from 食, is the radical of 饰/飾 only in the sense that it is listed that way in a Chinese dictionary. It is not the meaning-bearing part of the character. Here are two possible analyses. In both cases, 饣 is contributing to the pronunciation, not the meaning: 飾 = 食 (phonetic: shi2) + 布 (...


11

This radical is called the 双耳旁 or 双二刀, due to it looking somewhat like an ear or the 刀 character. There are actually two radicals depending on whether it's placed to the left or right: 左耳刀 if on the left, 右耳刀 if on the right. The two radicals have different origins and different meanings. http://baike.baidu.com/view/457766.htm The left version is derived ...


10

I feel like this question could elicit subjective and open-ended answers, but here goes anyway ... In Beijing, one of the classes I had was a dedicated 汉字 (Hànzì, Chinese character) class. In it, we were learning the most common radicals, and some word examples that contain that radical. We learnt how, often, the meaning is conveyed by the radical and the ...


10

I can only provide a partial answer: Many of the characters used in the names of non-Han ethnic groups were originally derogatory. After the founding of the PRC, the government conceptualized New China as a multiethnic state (多民族国家), and they changed many of the characters that were perceived as derogatory. I don't know if this process started under the KMT ...


10

According to zdic.net, 饰 is formed of 巾, 人, and 食 (饣). 食 (饣) is the sound component, while the other portion suggests the meaning. The dictionary explains the character's components this way: 形声。从巾,从人,食声。人佩巾有装饰作用。 So, it's a 'pictophonetic' character which signifies a person wearing or adorned with a cloth, thus having the effect of decoration. If you're ...


9

The radical in 猫 actually comes from 豸 zhi4 (beast), which you can still see in the traditional character 貓. Whereas the radical in 狗 is in fact 犭 quan3. The simplified version of 猫 got the 犭 quan3 radical because of trait reduction and semantic affinity (dog -> beast). If it sounds easier to you, you can think of 犭 quan3 in simplified Chinese as ...


9

For the character"冒",is the top part "日" or "曰"? Neither. 冒 is comprised of simultaneously semantic and phonetic 冃 (mào, hat) and phonetic 目 (mù). The word that both 冃 and 冒 originally represented is now written as 帽. Components are usually added on when the original character is too simple (and so can get confused with something else), or when the ...


8

Install input method tools such as Google Pinyin Windows only type u start to input then type follow to input radicals 丨 shu 竖 一 heng 横 丿 pie 撇 礻 shi 示 衤 yi 衣 But I think most easy way is Ctrl+C,Ctrl+V There is a list of radicals. Find it and copy it.


8

To ask an analogous question about the shapes of the letters in the Latin alphabet: Does the letter "E" contain the the letter "F"? It seems that "E" is just "F" with an extra horizontal line on the bottom. In terms of shapes in the modern script, it is trivially obvious that "E" contains the strokes of "F". What "E" does not contain is any ...


7

As @50-3 has mentioned, the 难 is the simplification of the traditional character 難. Most Chinese characters are phono-semantic compounds (形声字), in which the radical hints at the meaning while the phonetic hints at the pronunciation. In the case of 難, the phonetic component is 堇 while the radical is 隹. In modern Chinese, the pronunciation of 堇 has diverged ...


7

Before answering of which radical 将 should be, let me introduce some authoritative reference books. For traditional Chinese: 康熙字典 (compiled in Qing Dynasty) and 說文解字 (compiled in Eastern Han Dynasty by Xu Shen). The online dictionary I highly recommend is 漢典. For simplified Chinese: 新华字典. Its online version is 在线新华字典. However, I find the online version is ...


6

Just adding this to the already answered question to point out a few pertinent things: (1) the question of whether the 月/⺝ as seen in e.g. 能青育 and so on is really 'the same' or 'different' can be answered on many levels; on some levels, those components are the 'same' (because they 'look the same'), on other levels, they are 'different' (because they ...


6

I think your phrasing may be ambiguous, so I'll answer in two ways. If you're asking if characters didn't have a radical and then one was added - thereby changing the character - for classification purpose, then of course the answer is no. If the question is to know whether the "concept" of radical existed, then you can think of it this way: if people had a ...


6

I believe that Chinese characters are born with radicals, but they were not classified by radicals until Shuowen Jiezi. To understand why radicals appeared at that time, we need to know that in the Warring States period (about 475-221 BC), characters between states could be quite different. The First Emperor of Qin (Ying Zheng, known as Qin Shihuang) ...


5

From my experience, knowing the radicals does help to categorise characters in your head and it's somethign you can hold on to. However, I have no learned them in isolation, each time I learn a new word I make sure to look up the word in the dictionary which mentions the radical. I don't think it's helpful to learn 200+ radicals off the bat. For one some ...


5

The former interpretation is correct. Chinese characters are composed of components (some radicals, some phonetics, some neither). For many of the components, there are standard or widely used ways to refer to them. A common pattern is {component}+字+{旁/头/盖/底/儿/框}. (The last part refers to which part of the character it is--e.g., side, top, bottom, "...


5

Chinese native speakers don't treat 田 由 甲 申 甴 电 as related radicals. It is true that those radicals look very similar to each other, but we don't go further than that. We don't have any terms for this phenomenon, because we don't think it is something that needs special attention/study. Here are more examples: 刀 vs 力, 土 vs 士, 己 vs 已 vs 巳, 冂 vs 几, etc. In ...


5

you need to identify the prototype of radicals.for your example,the prototype of辶is走,the ptototype of 扌is手,草for艹,水for氵,冰for冫......,then you just type the prototype and find the radical.


5

Your idea is correct, at least most Chinese people agree with this. But in this case, 辵 is acturally combined of 彳 and 止. 彳 means "walk slowly" or "the step with left foot". 止 means "stop" or "halt". 辵 means "walk one moment and stop the next“. While 彡 means "plume", obviously having no connection with 辵. By the way, only 止 is frequently used in daily ...


5

部首: Radical, used for indexing dictionaries (Shuowen radicals, Kangxi radicals, radicals in modern dictionaries, etc.). 聲符1: Phonetic component. Also called 音符, but 音符 may also mean ‘musical note’. 意符: Semantic component. The famous paleographer Qiu Xigui 裘锡圭2 divides 意符 into two subcategories3: 義符: meaning component (it is the meaning of the component that ...


5

The, new, Outliers dictionary provides some insight as to how 寫 became 写: FORM 写 is shorthand for 寫. The top part, 冖, is a common abbreviation for 宀. The bottom part is a shorthand abbreviation for 舄 (see the diagram below for how that works). which is referenced from: 邵源、邵冠勇,2010《簡化漢字解說》,济南:齐鲁书社 2010年12月第一版。 It also continues: COMPONENTS 冖 In 写, 冖 is ...


5

There are exactly (no exceptions) 214 Kangxi radicals: Any misunderstanding to the number of these probably comes from a confusion to what radicals actually are. Remember that radicals are dictionary headers (部首), used to group characters or words in a dictionary. The Kangxi radicals are similarly used to group entries in the Kangxi dictionary, not any ...


5

You're right and not missing anything, 犬 quan 'dog' is written as 大 da 'big' plus 丶 zhu/dian 'dot'. There are more examples like that, for example, 金 jin 'gold' contains 人 ren 'person' and 王 wang 'king', and 食 shi 'food' also has 人 ren 'person' in it. However, no published dictionary that I know of will list 犬 under 大, or 金 under 人 or 王; in that sense, 犬 ...


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