4

FYI, you're overemphasising the importance of this. Firstly, the de facto international Chinese character radical indexing standard is the Kangxi system for orthodox characters, which is what Unicode primarily focuses on, not Xinhua dictionary's Simplified Chinese system (which itself is derived from the Kangxi system). Secondly, radicals are not character ...


4

There are multiple ways to decompose Chinese characters: Decomposed into the different... Approximate English analogue Example historical character combinations etymology 有 ← 𠂇 + ⺼ components orthography (morphemes) 有 ← 𠂇 + 月 components orthography (letters) 有 ← (一 + 丿) + (二 + 冂) strokes strokes 有 ← (一 + 丿) + (一 + 一 + 丨 + 𠃌) etc The "etymology&...


3

Sort of in a rush here so just some hints. First, I'd say the suggestion that 'their pinyin is different, so they must be kept apart' is, well, not wrong and not right. Neither of the two box/enclosure characters is used by itself in the modern language, so the situation never arises. There are also artificial radicals that were never used by themselves and ...


3

You're reading too much into it. The only clue to this meaning in the original characters has now been lost. You can take a look at the following dictionary excerpt to see exactly what information has vanished: Outlier: COMPONENTS 禾 In 秘, 禾 is an empty component. It is a corruption of 礻. The original character was 祕 “god; deity,” from which the meanings “...


2

For a student studying Chinese as a second language, is there any practical difference between the radicals 匚 and 匸? For the ordinary practical purposes of reading and writing there is no distinction, even when Chinese is used as a first language. In some fonts the distinction is only visible in the radicals themselves (匚 and 匸), and not when they appear as ...


2

I highly advise against understanding Chinese characters in terms of radicals. The word radical (部首) is a specialised term that is only relevant to Chinese Character dictionaries, which organise Chinese characters under section (部) headers (首). Chinese characters are actually just references to morphemes, and each Chinese character can simply be thought of ...


2

左阜右邑 (lit. left fu right yi) is a useful mnemonic to remind learners of Chinese that they are different radicals despite graphical similarity. Usually (but not always, see 5.) 阜 and 邑 (the 'ear') are the semantic component of the compound. An example of 阜 (mound; mountain) as the semantic component: the character 陳/陣 originally means 'an array' (of ...


2

There is a table of Kangxi radicals on Wikipedia: No. Radical (variants) Stroke Count Meaning Pīnyīn 45 屮 3 sprout chè 58 彐(彑) 3 snout jì 129 聿(⺺、⺻) 6 brush yù 159 車 7 cart chē Those should be the four you asked about above. Each of these radicals also have their own Wiki page. Radical 58 or radical snout (彐部) Chinese name(s): 雪字底 xuězìdǐ 尋字頭/寻字头 ...


1

部首 is typically (but not in all cases) used to illustrate a character's fundamental feature. 詈 means to curse, so it is related with 言(speak, remark, words etc.).


1

阜/ 阝 (Radical 170) - meaning: "mound" or "dam" - pinyin: /fu4/ 邑/ 阝 (Radical 163) - meaning: "city" - pinyin: /yi4/ 阝 is a character used in Kangxi writing which serves as the combining form of two distinct radicals, distinguished by whether it is on the left or right of a character. It is the combining form of Radical 170 (阜) ...


1

Yes this is possible, but there are a number of exceptions and edge-cases to account for. For example, some radicals have variants depending on their position (which are not typically considered distinct radicals): Radical Left variant Right variant Bottom Variant Exceptions 心 忄 ⺗ 人 亻 从 手 扌 拜 水 氵 沝 犬 犭 㹜 刀 刂 ⺈ 切 火 灬 災 There is also the issue ...


1

The link given by @user6065 :http://bishun.shufaji.com/0x8279.html classifies the two small strokes as 丨shù . These two strokes are very small and look more like small vertical dots 丶 diǎn. Then what is correct ? i would say the second...


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