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11

You can use the Google Advanced Search. key words: 兒童故事 language: Chinese (Traditional) region: Taiwan Some examples: 兒童文化館 中文兒童故事 兒童故事 格林童話集 兒童睡前故事 兒童故事 安安免費教學網-國小國語 安安免費教學網-千篇文章共賞


10

Well, this is what Japanese speakers do when they look at a Chinese text – they have some understanding of it since they recognize the characters. One fundamental problem, though, is that in modern Chinese, the majority of words are made up of two characters. There are two types of dictionary for Chinese, one that gives character meanings (字典) and one that ...


9

I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier and I'm even more surprised no one thought of this before me, well, I'm sure someone did just didn't find it on the internet. I was installing fonts and noticed some of the fonts that came with my operating system - OS X Mountain Lion - was cursive Chinese. So a thought occurred to me. Cut and paste the same ...


8

Counting distinct characters/words in chinese books is really easy, but what exactly does "typical" means? You can solve it by python. Then every time you meet a "typical" book(txt,mobi,azw format etc), you can count it by yourself. input The txt file of The Three-Body Problem I:Remembrance of Earth's Past The txt file of The Three-Body Problem II:The ...


7

According to Lü and Zhang (2010), Chinese is indeed read at a measurably faster speed than English. Findings indicate that the Chinese readers (24.7 minutes) are faster than the English readers (26.6 minutes) by about 2 minutes on the same reading material. Lü and Zhang, Reading efficiency: A comparative study of English and Chinese orthographies, ...


7

OK, here is my test. Dragonlance: Dragons of Autumn Twilight total: 238,872 (only Chinese is counted), individual: 2,882 I have never read this book, 2,882 is a friend number. There isn't a lot of 'magic' words in a fantasy novel. Sherlock·Holmes: A Study in Scarlet Total:72,217 Individual_sum: 2,546 聊斋志异 total:389,165, individual:4,935 Classical is 2 ...


7

Actually, I think a more interesting question is how many distinct characters there are in a book that aren't considered "common". To that effect, I used the 2854 results from rambler's answer for the three body problem 1 and the list of the 3500 commonly used characters (一级字/常用字) as presented in 通用规范汉字表, which was published in 2013 by the government of ...


5

I strongly recommend an online dictionary 汉典. It may be the most professional online Chinese dictionary even for native speakers. For every entry, you can refer to the section "字形分析" to know the classification of the character. For example, the character 强 is classified as compound ideographs (会意), which is shown in the picture: The dictionary also ...


5

The modern handwriting scripts of Chinese characters are 楷书, 行书 and 草书. 楷书 is the standard and official handwriting script, which is made up by 笔画 (strokes) and looks like printing script. It is the only handwriting script taught in primary schools in China, because it is the only legal standard of handwriting script. 行书 is the handwriting script that ...


5

If you want to have a quantitative answer you can look at the commulative character frequencies of larger Chinese text corpora. If compiled a list of the most common Chinese characters here (using this code). There you can see that if you know the 100 most common characters, you can recognize one third of the characters on Wikipedia. If you know the most ...


5

as Stumpy Joe Pete said, you'll be hard pressed to find a font that works in all cases, and that you may want to look into a browser extension that highlights, magnifies, and explains the character you've hovered over. I recommend Pera Pera Kun: http://www.perapera.org/ They have extensions for FireFox and Chrome. Here's a snapshot: I have never seen or ...


4

Yes a font does exist with pinyin on top of every character and it can be obtained from the Chinese page at www.pinyinok.com/pyhzk.htm but I do NOT recommend it for learning, because taking only the most common reading of every character leads to too many fundamental mistakes (e.g. 音乐 "music" comes out as "yīn lè" instead of "yīnyuè"). I came across one ...


4

I've looked for a similar font (with pinyin on top, or bottom) and have not found anything. There are a lot of naysayers on this thread, and I'm not sure why. Such a font would be extremely useful, even given the limitations. Creation of such a font would be automatic using publicly available databases, and even if the original fonts were copyrighted, one ...


4

Based on your demand, here are my picks. They're locally famous. China mainland 南方人物周刊, a featured weekly on influencing people, with some exclusive interviews. 南方周末, a weekly on politics, economics, culture, and especially recent (past week) controversial topics. 新京报, a daily with Beijing (or China) features. Founded in 2003. 财经网, a good source for ...


4

According to Zhonghua Zihai, the largest Chinese character dictionary, there are more than 85,000 Chinese characters! However, research (Huang 1994 and Da 2004) shows that the most frequently used 1200 Chinese Characters account for about 90% of the characters occurring in the real world. Therefore, this is about the number of characters needed for a learner ...


4

Before learning Cantonese, I used to read a lot of Chinese texts -- and I still do, even Mandarin texts, even though I don't speak Mandarin -- and I'd use the Korean reading of sinograms. For instance, 我是法國人 would be "아 시 법 국 인" / "a shi pǒp kuk in". So indeed I was able to read (and write) Chinese without being able to speak it... :-)


4

TL;DR Subtitles are not necessary. Large media Large media and news programs often supply subtitles, because they have more resources. The TV companies in mainland China act like public services, so they have to think about people who are not good at Mandarin, or have trouble with listening. Cooking programs, talk shows Some do, some don't. Since these ...


4

A quick way to learn characters is grinding flashcards in the spaced repetition app Anki – there are plenty of existing HSK vocab sets that other users have made. You can also check out Remembering Simplified Hanzi by James Heisig and Timothy Richardson to help with making mnemonics. For reading, I like Du Chinese and Decipher Chinese (now dead), which ...


4

Possibilities here I sometimes read essays written by Chinese children: RuiWang's 作文. They have all levels for free, starting from 一年级 (grade 1). You can find many English novels translated into Chinese and available for purchase on JingDong or other sites. I read Matilda (玛蒂尔达) this way. I thought it was helpful for improving my reading speed. You can ...


4

“汉字的序顺并不定一能影阅响读” 根剑据桥大的学研究,词汇中的字表母达的含并不义重要,重的只要是首末字母的位正置确与否。其字他母的位置可完以全混乱但你仍可通以顺地读出语句。这因是为人的意并识不是逐字阅母读,而逐是词阅读。 尽管剑大桥学从做未过这个实验,但这个段子确实让友外网海产生了不小兴趣。当它入传中国时,也就有了开头的那句话。 这也以可给一些网友一些发的挥空间,让他们利用这种自错动纠机制的洞漏来计设一些段子,以及用巧来妙回避某论些坛的关河键词蟹。 设注应计时意,最保好持每句两话首末个字不变,否效则果会大打折扣。另也外宜不过计设短语的句。 e.g. 小别致长得真东西。 source萌娘百科 btw,I can read the whole text in 3 seconds, partly ...


4

Hacking Chinese (by Olle Linge) mentions that the way to reading faster is to simply read more. Presumably extensive reading as opposed to intensive reading. That is, read many different texts that are well within your ability to read, as opposed to a few texts that are closer to the edge of your ability to read. By well within your ability to read, I mean ...


3

I found one tool via the website that NewLong linked to in his/her answer: Chinese Vocabulary Profiler. It does the following: A distribution of characters across ranges of frequency (how many characters fall within the 250 most common, how many within 251-500). Since difficult characters is at least part of the difficulty of a text, this is part of the ...


3

I'm not sure if this is what you are after: http://pub.mtholyoke.edu/journal/lrc/entry/chinese_readability_analysis


3

Senseless question. You wouldn't acknowledge, but you scan 'images', too when reading English. You never read a word letter-by-letter, unless you encounter something that is not familiar to you, foreign names, etc.


3

I’m Chinese and currently studying English. If you're just reading, your progress is probably very slow. I think that the best way to improve your skill is to have conversation with people. 你好,朋友,我是中国人,我正在学习英文。 如果你只是阅读,可能你的进展很慢。 我觉得提升你能力的最好办法是跟别人交流。


3

I am not an expert reader of Chinese script at all. However, a useful piece of advice was given to me when I started learning: instead of reading character-by-character, try to read in groupings. That is, scan the sentence first quickly to see if any hanzi are unrecognizable, then reread it another time with your eyes focusing on the trees but also the ...


2

EDIT: My answer to the first question is that the Official list of 2,000 characters contained in the book are what I would recommend. I am not qualified to answer regarding fluency and accept the answer of others. If you're interested in a good offline reference that you can study at length, I'd recommend McNaughton and Li's (1999) Reading & Writing ...


2

Another source mentioning would be The Marco Polo Project. They have a lot of articles including translations (which you probably don't need). It still has 2 main advantages over other sources: These articles are hand picked. So these are usually more interesting than the ones found on people.com.cn and the like. They put their focus in selecting articles ...


2

For Android, there is Pinyiner (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.astratech.chinesereader_free) . It works offline, you can even read books, mark new words and create flashcards.


2

Yes you can. Arthur Waley did, and we still owe him gratitude for beginning to open western eyes to Chinese literature. But that was 100 years ago, before electronics, before air travel, and Waley was a rare genius. Also Stumpy Joe Pete is entirely right. Profoundly deaf people can learn to read Chinese. But won't you say the words to yourself somehow ...


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