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12

Dictionaries, in general, will not incorporate tone sandhi rules into their pronunciations (of which Mandarin has quite a few) Wikipedia says the following: Mandarin Chinese Mandarin features several sandhi tone rules. When there are two 3rd tones in a row, the first one becomes 2nd tone, and the second one becomes a half-3rd tone. E.g. 你好 (nǐ + hǎo = ní ...


11

The correct one should be bu2 zai4 hu. Unless there is an emphasis for "NOT" CARE, a 4th tone bu4 is then used, but I rarely hear that as a native speaker. Let's review the tone change rule for 不, A second tone bu2 is used only when the tone of next character is a 4th tone, i.e. bu2 shi4. A forth tone bu4 is used if the tone of next character is 1st, 2nd ...


11

There have been conflicting claims on whether the second tone and the "raised third tone" are distinct, but according to Jerry Norman's 1988 book, Chinese, "Perceptual tests done by Dreher and Lee (1966) and Wang and Li (1967) established that native speakers are unable to make a consistent distinction between second tones and raised third tones" (147). So ...


9

Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. Cantonese does have a phenomenon of lexical derivation which involves a change of tone, known as 變音 or changed tone; many discussions consider both these tone ...


7

Simply put, there are no tone sandhi rules for when words change from their citation tone to the neutral tone. The appearance of the neutral tone is morphologically motivated, not phonologically motivated — in other words, the tone change is not governed by the sounds of the surrounding words. Because the definition of sandhi is phonologically-...


7

Zhang and Yang (2007:97) has an interesting remark on consecutive neutral tones within certain three-character words (三字組詞): 輕聲若同時出現在三字組詞的後兩個音節上,第二個音節的輕聲調型要根據第一音節的聲調變化,如同二字組的輕聲音節;但第三個輕聲音節一律都讀得短低,調型向下,類似模糊的去聲。如: (Translation) Should both of the latter two syllables within a three-character word possess the neutral tone, then the pitch of the neutral tone in ...


6

"bao3 bao0" is actually not a third tone sandhi here. It is because the tone of second bao3 got neutralized. Usually a second character of a two-character word would get neutralized, I would say it is a accent thing that depends on people from different places of China.


6

They are pronounced as 2-3 but only if they are within the same word boundary. If not, they are still pronounced as 3-3. I have given this example before:(一桶)(柳橙)。桶and柳are both third tone. Because they are in different word boundaries, there is no tone sandhi. They are pronounced as 3-3, or, more accurately, 3h-3h.


5

This rule is not so strict, as in my specification, we never pronounce 甲苯(methylbenzene),乙苯(ethylbenzene), 苯甲酸(acetic acid) in that fashion, though no ambiguity is produced, it is just weird and funny to pronounce so. However, for familiar words like 奶奶,姐姐, the other extreme is present, which is they are always pronounced as 21-5. (In my opinion, this is an ...


5

The classic sentence for multiple tone 3s is “Old Li buys good wine.” 老 李 買 好 酒 In citation form they are all tone 3s, of course: lao3 Li3 mai3 hao3 jiu3 Which ones change to tone 2? It basically depends on how fast you are speaking. If you are speaking slowly and carefully, only the tones that are within a phrase will ...


5

bù becomes bú when it precedes a falling tone. I don't know -> wǒ bù zhī dǎo I don't do -> wǒ bú zuò


5

That depends on why you are writing it. The standard, normal way of writing it is to disregard the changed tone and write the original tone, i.e. bù kèqi. The same goes for tone changes of 一 (yī). Not showing the tone change is not a problem in this context, because the rules governing how to change the tones are quite simple. Since most Pinyin is written ...


4

No, this is not standard Pinyin, if this form of tone sandhi is written out. The author is simply trying to convey what it would look like if written out (instead of retranscribing it with Chao-style tone letters). This type of sandhi ("Mandarin T2 Sandhi", for Tone 2 Sandhi), is mentioned only rarely, because it is a "prosodic-driven process", i.e. it ...


4

The rule of thumb is the following. When indexing it is yi1. For example 一楼 (first floor) 一声 (first tone) 第一 (the first) 一次世界大战 (World War I) 一来 (firstly) When counting (the same rule as 不) it is yi4 when followed by 1, 2, 3 tone 一呼百应 一毛不拔 一百 一扫而光 it is yi2 when followed by 4 tone 一蹴而就 一气呵成 For others, mostly yi1. For example 统一 均一 敬一丹(name) As a ...


3

It's pronounced deng2deng3 as in the typical tonal sandhi of two consecutive 3rd tones, like 老板 (lao2ban3). However I wouldn't outright exclude your first suggestion deng2deng0, as it might be pronounced like that in fast speech, or in the middle of a sentence.


3

真的是个好问题,我原来总结过一些规律,但可能不靠谱。我感觉是根前后字(组合成的那个字)有关。 比如: 一二三四,读1声 一骑绝尘,读2声 (如果骑读作ji4的话) 一马当先,读4声 我发现,除了"一二三四",如果"一"后面跟4声的词,"一"应该读2声,除了上面的例子还有诸如: 一箭双雕,一泄千里,一世英明…… 如果"一"后面是1声、2声、或3声,"一"应该读4声,诸如: 一帆风顺、一尘不染、一鼓作气、一往无前…… 也不知道准不准,欢迎提出反例。


3

The Pinyin for 蒙古 is written like this in ABC: Mẹ̌nggǔ Notice the dot under the letter E, this is an indicator that this word is read with tone sandhi. The tone sandhi rules dictate that meng3 gu3 be read: meng2 gu3 (méng gǔ) Another factor that may add to your confusion is the fact that the standard pronunciation in Taiwanese Mandarin is different. For ...


3

From Chinese Wiki: 连读变调现象在四川话口语中十分常见,但各地略有差异,以成渝片为例,大致来说四川话中的变调可以分为4类。 一是重叠词中的变调,一般而言如果组成该重叠词的字声调为阳平或去声,则第二个字变调为阴平(例词:爸爸[pa2pa1]、婆婆[pʰo2pʰo1]、舅舅[tɕiəu4tɕiəu1]、帕帕[pʰa4pʰa1]);同时,如果组成该重叠词的字声调为上声,第二个字变调为阳平(例词:姐姐[tɕiai3tɕiai2]、板板[pan3pan2])。 二是儿尾及儿化词中的变调,如果儿尾名词为阳平,儿尾变调为阴平(例词:娃儿[ua2ɚ1]、瓢儿[pʰiau2ɚ1]);如果儿化词的最后一个字为阳平,该字变调为阴平(例词:葡萄儿[pʰu2tʰɚ1]、麻雀儿[ma2tɕʰyɚ1])。 ...


3

Tone Sandi rule should merely apply to spoken. In written, you should always put original tones in any forms of exams except that those exams are testing the rule itself. In fact, I doubt most of natives are aware of the existence of Tone Sandi indeed. But they do apply the rule naturally in practice. I suggest you study by phrase, not by character. That ...


3

The Chinese pinyin system includes three parts: shengmu (initial), yunmu (final), and shenɡdiào (tones), and the tones in Mandarin are very important. Even if the initial and final are the same but have a different tone, the meaning will be different. So if you really want to master this language, you must learn to make each tone very clearly, otherwise you ...


3

This is a difficult problem to address, because 等等 apparently fits one of the criteria for neutral tone, but at the same time there is tone sandhi for two conjoint third-tone words. The following attempts to resolve the conflict between the two rules: The pronunciation of 33 words In my explanation below, I use 1 through 4 to indicate the first to fourth ...


3

As r13 duly mentioned, the expression 小打小鬧 is not an idiom with four consecutive third tones as you asserted. Only the first three (小打小) possess the third tone, while 鬧 is definitely in the fourth tone. I would say when it comes to tone sandhi, correct parsing is way more important than considering if the expression is "fixed" or not. You need to ...


2

Standard practice is not to change the tone diacritics to represent tone sandhi. So bù shì keeps the fourth tone on bù in spite of the pronunciation as bú shì. The same applies to the tones on 一 / yī, even though some learners dictionaries diverge from this rule. The rule also applies to third-tone sandhi. See for example Tone change rules in the Chinese ...


2

For purposes of "tonality," Chinese doesn't want to have two words with the fourth tone or third tone "back to back." When this happens, the first word in the series takes the second tone instead. The example of using two words with fourth tones such as 不在 is one where the two words together are pronounced bu2zai4, even though they are pronounced 不bu4 and ...


2

(This was originally a part of my answer on another question concerning tone sandhi AND neutral tones. I feel my explanation below on just tone sandhi befits here more. Consider this a slight extension to the accepted answer.) The pronunciation of words consisting of more than two adjacent third-tone characters depends on correct parsing. E.g. 1 老/總統 333 >...


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