6

In short, the second noun "事" is omitted. The complete sentence should be like this: 有什么事是我该做的(事)吗? For more, in Chinese, the attributive clause goes before. The proper way to translate "Is there anything I should do?" is "有什么我该做的事吗?


6

The “进” part is called directional complement. Rather simply, as we do in English, you can add a directional word to the verb, to describe where the verb is going. The most common words to indicate a direction are: 上, up and 下, down <== notice how they kind of look like arrows? 进, in and 出, out 过, to cross over 起, up 回 to come back. 到 ...


5

Is it correct that descriptor clauses with 的 are nouns? I think the answer is yes. E.g. we say 这是“我应该做的”,这是“我想要的”,“我知道的”就这么多,"你不要的"就给我,etc. Is 什么事 a single term that corresponds to "something/anything"? No, it's not the single term for "something/anything". "something/anything" can be 某事/任何事. It could also be interpreted with other words. It relies on ...


5

Let's begin with 什么都 meaning "everything"; see Expressing "everything" with "shenme dou" at the Chinese Grammar Wiki. We can add a verb or an adjective afterwards: 什么都 + adjective 什么都美丽 (everything is beautiful) 什么都辣 (everything is spicy) 什么都简单 (everything is simple) which we negate with 不: 什么都不美丽 (everything is not beautiful) 什么都不辣 (...


5

You need a subject before the disposal marker "把" and 昨天 is not a subject If you add a subject in your sentence and write 昨天他把我吃得站不起来 (yesterday, he ate me to the point of I couldn't stand up) The verb (eat) would not match the result (I couldn't stand up) What would make sense, is something like: "昨天他把我打得站不起来" (yesterday, he beat me to the point of I ...


5

It is all because of that 为 Basically the following two sentences have the same meaning: 这椅子是专门提供给老人的 这椅子是专(门)为老人提供的 English translation will be: We provided this chair specifically for the elders It is actually quite common to use the 为 to move the verb after the subject to emphasize the "for" For example, My heart only beats for you 我的心只为你跳动


5

This is the classic "topic-comment" structure in Chinese sentences. Bring the object of the verb to the beginning of the sentence for focus and emphasis, then comment on it. 作业他一点都没做。 Homework (topic) - he didn't do one bit (comment). He didn't do one bit of homework. 法語我一句都不會講。 French (topic) - I don't know how to say even one sentence (comment). I ...


4

This is all subsumed under "topicalisation". Chinese does it, but so do others (even Latin!). Indeed, most languages have a way of focusing on something, and Chinese allows certain word orders. The first example is "object NP fronting" or "object preposing". 朋友要的词典 玛丽 买到了 comes from... 玛丽 买到了 朋友要的词典 This is particularly favoured when the wording of ...


4

看足球赛 is a complete sentence Adding adjective marker "的" after a sentence or phrase turn it into an adjectival phrase. Adjectival phrase describes the noun that follows. [Simple phrase]: 看足球赛 = watch football match [Adjectival phrase]: 看足球赛(的) = (those who) watch football matches [Adjectival phrase with subject]: 看足球赛(的)学生 = (those/ the) students (...


4

These are both idioms (成语) with fixed structures, so deleting the 一 (yī) = "one" would change the meaning, and make it nonsensical. This also holds for Chinese words such as 一起 and 第一. 一丝不苟 basically means "[even] one thread not careless", referring to meticulousness. 不屑一顾 basically means "disdain [even] one consideration", or "disdain even considering it ...


4

Quote from the page on chineseboost: Use a descriptive complement You may be interested to know that you can also use 把 to get a little bit more descriptive and interesting than the standard things being moved around, changed, affected etc. This is commonly done with a descriptive complement. This just means that some extra description comes right ...


3

I think my answer to this post Anyone heard a saying about marriage being like cooking rice? answered your question about when to use 米已成炊. There is an expression "米已成炊" (rice is cooked) It describes "既成事實" (a realized fact) When raw rice is cooked, it cannot be changed back to raw again. Old Chinese thinking considered marriage is permanent, must ...


3

米已成炊 or 木已成舟 can't be used like the way you use them. They describe a situation where you can do nothing but accept the fact because something has already happened and there's no way you could undo it. Usually, it goes like: 我已经把我的故事都告诉你了,没有办法再收回来了。 现在米已成炊了,我能怎么办呢? Or 我已经把我的故事都告诉你了,现在米已成炊, 没有办法再收回来了。


3

A在B的东边 has two meanings,one meaning is that A is inside of B, another could be outside of B. The first one can be stated more clearly as: A在B的东部,and the second one as A在B的东边上(也可用:A在B的东面)。 However, if you say A在B的东边,most Chinese will judge which mean by the context or by further questions. So you do not need worry too much


3

Quote:- "I'd like to know if there are specific ways to use each measure word or all can be use freely" If I understand the question correctly, my answer is:- (1) there are specific ways to use each "measure word" Just like in English or I suspect any other language, you have measure words like a "troop" of monkeys, a "flock" of birds, and you could not ...


3

I am no grammar expert, but let me attempt an answer based on my level of attainment. I am sure others could do better. This is one of the most commonly occurring and useful word in the Chinese language, just about behind 的 & 了。 The problem is, (just like 的 & 了), it is a preposition, and when used in combination it becomes a verb, a conjunction, ...


3

Ergative constructions (作格结构) is one name for a phenomenon where the one subject argument in the intransitive version of the construction is the same as the direct object of the transitive version. These ergative verbs are variously called labile verbs, unaccusative verbs (非宾格动词), anticausative verbs; they have even been posited as reflecting a sort of ...


3

Quote:- "...only 搬 is the verb in the sentence ‘我们搬进了一幢楼房’,but not ‘进’,what is the role of ‘进’ in the sentence? 搬进, (move in), is a "compound verb" -- i.e. a verb that is made up of multiple words. In English, you have "I believe in you"; "His car swerved and tumbled over", "You need to work on your Chinese", :) So, without the 进, your sentence would ...


3

正确答案应该是: 你还别不相信,他出马准知道什么毛病。 or 你还别不相信,他一出马准知道什么毛病。 出马: take up the matter 你还别不相信: you should believe. "别不"是双重否定,表示肯定。


3

主题:YYY分部ABC职位申请之跟进 尊敬的XXX, 您好! 望您安度时艰,身体无恙! 此函意在跟进本人近日申请伦敦分部职位一事。本人已经由ZZZ渠道递交对ABC职位之申请,以担忧贵方尚未收到之故,随函再附本人履历及求职信。效力于贵司之心愿迫切,所以确认再三,还望海涵! 如有疑问,请与本人联系。感谢拨冗垂阅,敬盼回音! 此致, 祝好! 署名 I don't think it is just about one or two phrase substitutes, but the cultural differences behind writings... We tend to use more literary and ...


3

也 has the meanings of "also; besides; either; too" When 也 means "even": [商店里也] = [even in the stores] [商店里也]没有一个面包 = Don't have a single bun [even in the stores] [一个面包也] = [even a single bun] 商店里[一个面包也]没有。 = Don't have [even a single bun] in the stores When 也 means "too": [商店里也] = [In the stores too/ also/ either] [商店里也]没有面包 = ...


3

商店里也没有一个面包。 商店里一个面包也没有。 The first use of 也 means also and the second one put an emphasis to express surprise. However, the first sentence sounds stilted. 商店里也没有面包 is natural. It might be because if there isn't any bread at all in the shop then there should not be a piece of it. So 一个 is unnecessary here.


3

第一家商店一个面包也(都)没有,第二家商店也同样没有。 The first shop didn't even have one loaf of bread, the second shop also the same story. From these definitions of 也,found here, I would say the first 也 corresponds with 2. 'even' and the second 也 corresponds with 3. 'also' It is not surprising that even and also are very close: even: Old English efen "level," also "equal, like; ...


3

When the conjunction 就 means "just" or "then", it doesn't go before noun 玛丽 is a noun The sentence should be 听了我的话,玛丽很快(就)不哭了。 --> Mary quickly (just) stop crying or 听了我的话,玛丽(就)很快不哭了 --> Mary (then) quickly stop crying Edition: Notice: When 就 means "ONLY", it does go before noun Example: 他们都哭了,(就)玛丽不哭 --> They all cried, (only) Mary didn't


3

It is acceptable and understandable. 作業他一點都沒做。(He did not even do small amount of homework.) Think the component as [thing][person][description used to denote less amount of thing][description used to emphasize not][action], where [person] is the one that did not even perform the [action] on small amount of [thing]. [description used to denote less amount ...


3

You don't translate that. Just say Mr Zhang. Such obsequiousness is more a Chinese thing. I call strangers on the street 老板 or 师傅. 在中国, 你真正的老板是你的女朋友!(别忘了!)


2

The properly grammatical way to say this is: 我学中文学了四年了. First of all this uses the proper double 了 structure to convey "continuation", secondly it uses a topic comment structure: Topic: 我学中文 "as for my Chinese studies..." Comment: 学了四年了 "I have been studying for four years" This "double 了" structure is discussed in this online article which contains almost ...


2

就 in 你现在就去做 functions as the adverb "just". 你现在去做 = you go do it now 你现在(就)去做 = you (just) go do it now Example of 就 = at once; right away: 吃完飯去 = go after finish dinner 吃完飯(就)去 = go (right away) after finish dinner 吃完飯 is the requirement. Once this requirement is met, then 去 occur at once 完成工作付工資 = when you finished work, I will pay your service ...


2

You can look here in the new-look zdic for many uses. For example sentences you can look here or here. Often 在 is used with words like 上、下、里 as a double preposition. Watch out for that. The difference between 吃 and 在吃?Not much and subtle! 你要吃饭还是吃面? Would you like rice or noodles? 我吃饭。I want rice. 我吃面。I want noodles. 我在厨房里吃晚饭。I'm in the kitchen eating ...


2

Like in most languages, expression of the concept of not having anything in Chinese is most naturally done as a negative, viz 您没有未读消息。 My English voicemail employs "You don't have any unread messages" in the same way. However, the use of 零 líng + a classifier like 個 gè is attested, albeit in very limited contexts, most commonly in temperature (to "...


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