22

8x8: Lowest necessary resolution for Chinese characters As far as I know, the recognizable lowest resolution for Chinese characters, is about 8x8 pixels. The following paragraphs are rendered by the Special SimSun font's smallest 8x8 bitmap glyphs (Note: "Before Revision" is rendered by the Windows Vista's default simsun.ttc; "After Revision" shows how ...


14

Same meaning: 崕 = 崖 (ㄧㄚˊ / yá) = cliff; precipice 峰 = 峯 (ㄈㄥ / fēng) = peak; summit 毗 = 毘 (ㄆㄧˊ / pí) = to adjoin; to border on 群 = 羣 (ㄑㄩㄣˊ / qún) = group; crowd 飃 = 飄 (ㄆㄧㄠ / piāo) = to float 鄰 = 隣 (ㄌㄧㄣˊ / lín) = neighbor; adjacent Different meanings: 早 (ㄗㄠˇ / zǎo) = early; morning 旪 (ㄒㄧㄝˊ / xié) = 協 = agreement 吟 (ㄧㄣˊ / yín) = to chant; to recite 含 (...


13

Brief Answer The construction of 惊 follows the essence of the phono-semantic compound character. In folk culture, people who are not well-educated often invent characters in this way. Some of these characters became popular and then were included in the officially admitted simplified forms, and the others were eliminated. For example (admitted formal ...


13

No, you should use 省会 (provincial capital) instead, i.e. 哈尔滨是黑龙江的省会. You could also use 省城 (in a little old-style), or 首府 (especially for 自治区(autonomous region)). 首都 is only used for the capital of a country, e.g.北京是中国的首都.


12

To answer your question, we need to clearly understand how Traditional Chinese characters got simplified, which I bet 99.999999% of the whole Chinese population don't even know about. This is a very big topic that I am not able to discuss about it in detail. So I will give a much simplified explanation. Consider these 2 sets: Traditional Characters vs ...


10

Traditional to Simplified is many-to-one, right?? It is almost the case that each Traditional character maps to exactly one Simplified character (possibly itself). This is certainly the mental model that most people have about simplification, and it's not far from the truth. Alas, there are exceptions. One of my favorite references on this topic lists out ...


10

Simplified Chinese is no stupid command from "communist overlords". There was a committee discussing simplification, and they did choose simplified characters with academic discretion. I have found this semi-official book for explaining the sources of almost each simplified characters, plus the history of Chinese character simplification from Qing Dynasty: 《...


10

是嗎? (or 有嗎? or 真的嗎?) 我覺得沒有很好吔。 Really? I do not think it's very good. Really? I don't think my Chinese is very good. or 沒有啦!謝謝你。 No. Thank you. Not at all. Thank you. You don't have to worry about this. It's just like somebody asks a foreigner, "Where are you from?".


10

Six dots. It is called 刪節號 in Taiwan, and 省略号 in China. Both use 6 dots.


9

These are two totally different words in Chinese. Be careful about the writing of them, then you will know the difference between them, just like the English words "pee" and "pea".


8

For a big-data Chinese corpus, have a look at this one: (Taiwan) Academia Sinica Balanced Corpus of Modern Chinese 台灣 中央研究院 中文詞知識庫小組 現代漢語平衡語料庫 A million-word level corpus Contact: Miss Su-Chu Lin (林素朱), jess@hp.iis.sinica.edu.tw Introduction in Chinese Not sure if you can download it for free


7

As @50-3 has mentioned, the 难 is the simplification of the traditional character 難. Most Chinese characters are phono-semantic compounds (形声字), in which the radical hints at the meaning while the phonetic hints at the pronunciation. In the case of 難, the phonetic component is 堇 while the radical is 隹. In modern Chinese, the pronunciation of 堇 has diverged ...


7

In simplified Chinese, both would be 台, easy peasy. Otherwise, things get a little complicated. Sometimes 台 is just an alternative form for 臺, which is the case for Taiwan: you can write 臺灣 or 台灣, both are acceptable, though the former is considered more formal. In the case of 台山, that is the correct name already, so you can't write 臺山 because 臺 is not an ...


7

There's one here with 2580 characters.


7

我们=we, us everyone=每人,人人,每个 "every" means 每 in Chinese. "one" indicates people or thing. So, the correct translation would be 每人 or 每个; and, in Chinese, 每人 is the same as 人人.


7

The most common word for "everyone" is "大家". However, since you mentioned "people symbol 2 times", you are probably looking for "人人", which is a special form for a few words. For example 人人 is everybody, 天天 is every day and so on. It is in fact a short form for 每个人 (each person).


7

頔 U+9814 𬱖 U+2CC56 必需装含有“扩充-E”的字型才能显示。(请自己去找字型,noto 可能可以)GB18030 应该没有。


7

On a system level, there was never a movement of simplification until the early 20th century. Chinese characters developed from less refined writing techniques and simpler shapes to more standardised writing styles and characters with more complex structures. This is because simple shapes have two (possibly related) problems: They're too easy to confuse ...


6

I just started a project to make such a font. You can find it here: http://rtega.be/chmn/index.php?subpage=68


6

This is discussed extensively in this thread: http://forum.reviewingthehanzi.com/viewtopic.php?id=7698 A quote Because the "simplified" version of this character was made PRC standard when the new character lists were published. Even though nothing was actually simplified. There was a committee in China tasked with simplifying and standardizing ...


6

Like a few other simplifications, 兰 is derived from the grass script for the traditional form. The first three strokes are derived from the 草字头 (the grass radical). Various character forms can be seen on this site.


6

It is very likely because you are still learning. When I started learning I had the same experience. At a regular font size, some characters that were different looked indistinguishable. As you become more familiar with the characters, you will find that you are comfortable reading them at smaller font sizes. My suggestion is to use whatever size feels ...


6

It means awesome. All English translations for 给力 at mdbg.net: cool, nifty, awesome, impressive, to put in extra effort http://www.mdbg.net/chindict/chindict.php?page=worddict&wdrst=0&wdqb=geili The word has also found it's way into English slang in the form of geilivable http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=geilivable Geilivable is not ...


6

Just looking at the title you can tell it's simplified. Why? 耸 is the simplified version 聳. Although, technically possible, it's highly unlikely that a book with a simplified title would be "in" traditional.


6

It is in simplified Chinese, you can see this on the bottom part of the page, The sentence in the red frame means: "Language: Simplified Chinese"


6

Chinese characters can have multiple meanings and multiple pronunciations. You figure out the intended pronunciation and meaning based on the context. In the context 睡觉 (Shuìjiào,"go to sleep"), the pronunciation is jiào and the meaning is "(a period of) sleep". In the context 感觉 (Gǎnjué, "feeling"), the pronunciation is jué and it contributes the meaning "...


6

Kanji is the Japanese word for 漢字 (Chinese character). It is "hanzi" in Chinese. And only hanzi has tranditional and simplified forms. Kanji is also simplified, but kanji has only one official form in Japan. Chinese Simplified is the official writing system in mainland China, Chinese Traditional is the official writing system in Macau, Hong Kong, Taiwan. ...


6

对不起 is not wrong. According to the scenario, it's fine if you intent to use it for the meaning of I'm sorry (for bothering or disturbing). You can also use 不好意思 or 打扰一下 instead, if you won't bother the random people much.


5

Let me summarize the cases and try to answer your question (TC = Traditional Chinese character set, SC = Simplified Chinese character set). Some characters were never simplified. For example, 井 U+4E95 is in TC and in SC (and for that matter, most characters). In the Unihan database, codepoints like these have neither a kSimplifiedVariant nor a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible