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8 votes

Why did so many Ks change into Js and Qs?

"Peking", "Nanking", and "Chungking" are Chinese postal romanisations of the pronunciations based on Ming-era and Qing-era Nanjing Mandarin. This is a different dialect ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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5 votes

Why did so many Ks change into Js and Qs?

This is sound change called palatalization. It occurred in history of many languages. That page lists various examples. Palatalization most often affected velar consonants such as /k/, /g/. In ...
Arfrever's user avatar
  • 306
5 votes

Spoken unsubtitled Min in a (now deleted) Youtube video: characters?

The full lyrics can be found on the Web. (But, there are a few minor errors.) A video with all subtitles can be found on the YouTube site. (There are a few minor errors too.) The lyrics are the words ...
user-487's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Can Chinese words start with a vowel?

The only cases I can think about are: 安 an 饿 e 耳 er 啊 a o 哦 ou 欧 ai 爱 ao 奥 en 恩 All examples may have multiple cases under different tones
Archeosudoerus's user avatar
5 votes

Can Chinese words start with a vowel?

There are some Mandarin Chinese Pinyin sequences which consistently start with a vowel. As mentioned in the comments, these have a Pinyin representation which starts with y or w: 義, Pinyin yì, IPA /i⁵...
dROOOze's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Is there such thing as Chinese spelling alphabet?

The idea of a "spelling alphabet" of course assumes the concepts of "spelling" and "alphabet", which does not apply to Chinese characters. That is not to say that ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 6,761
3 votes

Why many professional Xiangqi players cannot pronounce 車 correctly?

Because in 廣韻 (a Chinese rime dictionary from 1000 years ago), 車 has two different pronunciations, 1: kio and 2: chja. As time goes by, 1 becomes ju and 2 becomes che. In ancient Chinese, 1(ju) refers ...
BoomingBones's user avatar
3 votes

Is there such thing as Chinese spelling alphabet?

Instead of spelling words, Chinese speakers in general explain the characters in terms of other words, a kind of 解说. Chinese speakers do quite a lot of this when encountering names, much like many ...
Bósài's user avatar
  • 655
3 votes

"醡" and "炸" in "醡醬麵" and "炸醬麵"

I'd like to say something different. 炸醬麵 is the only correct word. We need to clarify why Zhajiangmian is called so. Zhajiangmian originated from Shandong Province, and the core of it is the sauce, ...
Winfred Huang's user avatar
2 votes

Why is it written LIU in Pinyin, when there's clearly an O sound?

In addition, if you write jiou it will be ji'ou(奇偶) rather than 就(jiu) and *iu disambiguates that.
imkzh's user avatar
  • 531
2 votes

Why is it written LIU in Pinyin, when there's clearly an O sound?

I think, although pinyin is super helpful, it has serious issues inherent in design. There are many confusing elements there, and this disappearing of "o" sound is only one of them. There are other ...
Xuehong Zhang's user avatar
2 votes

Why is it written LIU in Pinyin, when there's clearly an O sound?

Because liu is actually pronounced that way in the first tone and second tone. This applies to -ui and -un. But in the third tone you have a longer syllable where a schwa is inserted so it sounds ...
iopq's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes

Why is it written LIU in Pinyin, when there's clearly an O sound?

There do exist "o" in the vowel "iu", which is originally "iou". However, for the convenience of daily using, they omitted the "o". (also, uei --> ui) pinyin: -iou --> -iu zhuyin(注音): 一(i)ㄡ(ou) ...
Kara's user avatar
  • 46
2 votes

Two-character homonyms with same meaning

The Chinese language, especially formal register Chinese, seems to like balanced words, i.e., 2 characters (chars). There are different permutations internally for 2-char words (V O rendered ...
Lillian Chia's user avatar
2 votes

Using 瑞士的瑞 to address the character 瑞

Not awkward at all. It is in fact a common way to refer to 瑞. Another option is using 瑞雪兆丰年的瑞.
Mou某's user avatar
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2 votes

Questions on a Hakka song and its particular Hakka dialect

Here is the pseudo-answer I promised to include the info that doesn't fit in the question body. Precise transcription of what I hear So I picked this video, and tore it apart in 0.25 speed to figure ...
MickG's user avatar
  • 2,310
2 votes
Accepted

How to change line in dictation?

Do you mean to create a newline? 换行 huànháng works.
Mou某's user avatar
  • 35.9k
2 votes

What does 原配手撕小三 mean?

lol 手撕 is just a humorous way of saying "launching a fierce attack". 手 doesn't necessarily mean hand or physical. It has some connotation of "directly, unaided." (much like 手动 vs 自动) It best ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 186
2 votes

What does 原配手撕小三 mean?

原配/手撕/小三 as indicated by the other answer, 原配 means his first/legal wife and 小三 mistress. 手撕 is used metophorically here. Its literal meaning is tear by hand. In the context, I could imagine his ...
dan's user avatar
  • 24k
2 votes
Accepted

What does 原配手撕小三 mean?

原 (original/ first) 配 (match) "原配" is short for "原配夫人" (first legal wife) In olden time China, it was very common for rich men to have multiple legal wives. And the first wife ...
Tang Ho's user avatar
  • 79.9k
2 votes

Why did so many Ks change into Js and Qs?

Different people may have different opinions on your question and the answers. That is totally OK on a public discussion forum. My answer posted here is different from other people. I hope those who ...
PdotWang's user avatar
  • 4,395
1 vote

Hello! Can someone please translate: 'My Little Ghost' to Chinese?

Since your story background is in ancient China, expressions such as 我的小鬼 seems to be inappropriate. If you're considering making the story in Classical Chinese, the following words may be helpful: ...
Leonel Hou's user avatar
1 vote

Hello! Can someone please translate: 'My Little Ghost' to Chinese?

My Little Ghost: 我的小鬼: Wǒ de xiǎoguǐ
Noé's user avatar
  • 145
1 vote

Using 瑞士的瑞 to address the character 瑞

瑞 is a character mainly used in names. And this is a common way to refer to 瑞 using names "瑞士"(Swiss), "瑞典"(Sweden). (In some province of China, you might be able to use the names of some important ...
Aria Ax's user avatar
  • 575
1 vote

"醡" and "炸" in "醡醬麵" and "炸醬麵"

It is very clear if you search 醡醬麵 on google. All the results are about 炸酱面. I would simply say 醡醬麵 does not exist, it is a typo. As is stated by other answers, 炸酱面 might be only known to the north, ...
River's user avatar
  • 2,626

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