11

Actually, "好包了" does not mean "I'm full". You may see "...打好包了..." in the Google hits. It refers to "have made something into a package. If your friend say "这顿饭我包了". That means your friend will get the bill, and you don't pay the bill. You will see "7天包退" on some goods's package, that means "7 days to cancel purchase for non-faulty goods". And "...


6

The character 分 has two different readings. As fen1, it has a range of meanings. As fen4, it can mean a role or part played by a person, a more general part or portion of something, or a component. Fen4 can also be written 份, and dictionaries I consulted from both Taiwan and the mainland don’t seem to differ here. The Far East Chinese-English Dictionary, ...


6

醡醬麵 and 炸醬麵 炸醬麵 can work as it means "noodles with fried sauce" 醡醬麵 is "noodles with extracted sauce (e.g. extracting oil)" 炸 fried (火 fire radical + phonetic 乍 zhà) 醡 extract (酉 container + 窄 narrow; from 穴 hole and 乍) Archaic character for 榨 (tool for extraction process. 木 wood used to refer to tools in this case) 醬 sauce 麵 noodles Alternatively, 酢醬麵 ...


5

The full lyrics can be found on the Web. (But, there are a few minor errors.) A video with all subtitles can be found on the YouTube site. (There are a few minor errors too.) The lyrics are the words that a mother, who is a singer, tells her daughter whose name is 麗蘭, Lì-lán in Mandarin or Le-lán in Taiwanese Hokkien. The following lyrics have been modified ...


5

I think it is a terrible mistake that the website has made, because there is no occasion when qu is pronounced tsʰu in Mandarin. Since you can actually tell the difference between u and ü, things should be easier for you now. You can just memorise that after (pinyin) j, q, x, y, ü is always written as u, and if you see u after j, q, x, y, it's always ...


4

We call these words "异形词" in Chinese. Definition from Wikipedia: 异形词,是指在普通话书面语中并存并用的同音(指声母、韵母和声调完全相同)、同义(指理性意义、色彩意义和语法意义完全相同)而书写形式不同的词语。例如:“笔画”和“笔划”、“按语”和“案语”、“唯一”和“惟一”等等。实际的使用当中,除了书写的差异之外,它们还有使用频率的不同,但是一般不会造成误解。 中华人民共和国教育部和国家语言文字工作委员会2002年3月31日发布试行了《第一批异形词整理表》。 在繁体中文里面,异形词现象也是存在的。而汉字简化并没有完全消除这些现象,所以从繁体中文中继承也是异形词的主要来源之一。 Here's a link for 《第一批异形词整理表》: ...


4

The only cases I can think about are: 安 an 饿 e 耳 er 啊 a o 哦 ou 欧 ai 爱 ao 奥 en 恩 All examples may have multiple cases under different tones


4

There are some Mandarin Chinese Pinyin sequences which consistently start with a vowel. As mentioned in the comments, these have a Pinyin representation which starts with y or w: 義, Pinyin yì, IPA /i⁵¹/ (starts off with /i/, the close front unrounded vowel) 完, Pinyin wán, IPA /u̯a̠n³⁵/ (starts off with a dipthong containing /u/, the close back rounded vowel)...


4

There is no expression "好包了". Actually, "好饱了" is also a strange spelling, since we usually use "我吃饱了" to express "I am full".


3

It is okay to say Macbook Air in between Chinese, or you can say 苹果的Air电脑 or 苹果的Air系列电脑 if you must. More info: It seems that mainland Chinese are adapting 电脑, but I want to point out both 電腦(traditional Chinese) and 计算机(simplified Chinese) means "computer". 電腦 is used everywhere while 计算机 is only for formal use in mainland China. (計算機/计算机 can mean "...


2

In addition, if you write jiou it will be ji'ou(奇偶) rather than 就(jiu) and *iu disambiguates that.


2

I think, although pinyin is super helpful, it has serious issues inherent in design. There are many confusing elements there, and this disappearing of "o" sound is only one of them. There are other ones, such as "i" pronounced so differently in "qi, ci, chi", and how come "an" sounds so different in "wan" and "yan", etc. Pinyin and Mandarin pronunciation ...


2

Because liu is actually pronounced that way in the first tone and second tone. This applies to -ui and -un. But in the third tone you have a longer syllable where a schwa is inserted so it sounds like -iou, -uei, -uen Actually the fourth tone is the shortest, but it goes the other way. 对 dui4 actually sounds like due, the diphthong doesn't finish since it'...


2

There do exist "o" in the vowel "iu", which is originally "iou". However, for the convenience of daily using, they omitted the "o". (also, uei --> ui) pinyin: -iou --> -iu zhuyin(注音): 一(i)ㄡ(ou) now we have: ㄌ(l)ㄧㄡ(iou) or l+iou=liu: 溜流柳六 ㄐ(j)ㄧㄡ(iou) or j+iou=jiu: 糾(no second tone)久就 ㄋ(n)ㄧㄡ(iou) or n+iou=niu: 妞牛紐拗 But for the case the vowel "iou" ...


2

"醡" is not only tradtional spelling but also simplified spelling. So does "炸". "炸" can be used in both tradtional chinese and simplified chinese. "炸酱面", "炸醬麵", "醡酱面" and "醡醬麵" are all right. However, "炸" is used in mainland China, and "醡" is used in Taiwan usually. It seems like that "apartment" is used in the USA and "flat" is used in the Uk. So the view ...


2

Not awkward at all. It is in fact a common way to refer to 瑞. Another option is using 瑞雪兆丰年的瑞.


2

The Chinese language, especially formal register Chinese, seems to like balanced words, i.e., 2 characters (chars). There are different permutations internally for 2-char words (V O rendered externally as a V; adj N rendered externally as a N; etc.). I am only using the permutation that has both chars with the same meaning (be it V V, or N N, e.g.). ...


2

Here is the pseudo-answer I promised to include the info that doesn't fit in the question body. Precise transcription of what I hear So I picked this video, and tore it apart in 0.25 speed to figure out exactly how the tones and sounds went. And this is my transcription. Thi33 khiu55-ngian51 e334 sam11 ngiat2-fun33 Ngai24 yu55 mung55 to331 ngai11 e33 a11-...


2

原 (original/ first) 配 (match) "原配" is short for "原配夫人" (first legal wife) In olden time China, it was very common for rich men to have multiple legal wives. And the first wife is called "原配夫人" or simply "原配". Nowadays, it simply means a man's wife 手 = hands 撕 = tear The term 手撕 is most commonly seen in "手撕鸡&...


2

原配/手撕/小三 as indicated by the other answer, 原配 means his first/legal wife and 小三 mistress. 手撕 is used metophorically here. Its literal meaning is tear by hand. In the context, I could imagine his wife pinched and twisted the mistress' face and inflicted some other humiliating attacks. 手撕 here indicates more physically than verbally.


2

lol 手撕 is just a humorous way of saying "launching a fierce attack". 手 doesn't necessarily mean hand or physical. It has some connotation of "directly, unaided." (much like 手动 vs 自动) It best translates to "the wife tears the mistress apart by her own hand".


2

Do you mean to create a newline? 换行 huànháng works.


1

瑞 is a character mainly used in names. And this is a common way to refer to 瑞 using names "瑞士"(Swiss), "瑞典"(Sweden). (In some province of China, you might be able to use the names of some important towns in the province. For example, 瑞丽)


1

Without sounding too technical, a homonym appears to mean 'of the same sound' (homophone) and/or 'of the same form' (homograph), but the common usage of the word homonym is to mean one of a group of words that share the same spelling and pronunciation but have different meanings Thus, a 'synonymous homonym' is an oxymoron. From your description, you're ...


1

You are right, it means 'choose', and the difference of pronunciation, (as a Taiwanese I think it) is due to the song. (The elongation of that note.) So both suán-ti̍k or sng-tia are fine.


1

This has been an immense effort. I posted on Youtube, Hakka Verse (Facebook) and here, and no posting got me a complete answer. Va Vang (now vugh va, impossible to notify) provided the first characters for the part I reported for completeness. Then I posted on Hakka Verse, and we improved the spelling for that. Then I posted here, and after waiting for ages ...


1

結時涯騙單儕 mean 都是我騙自己 in Chinese. It can be translated like "just deceiving myself". 結時 is just Hakka tone for speak out, not really a word in this song. You can translate the Chinese word that sentence in the YouTube video. That Chinese sentence can translate nearly But 做麽死死等到老 is correct, not 卻還死心塌地. 做麽死死等到老 means 就這麼死死等到老. It can be translated like "waiting ...


1

I'm Chinese , I think it make no sense to spell this voice in Chinese Characters. And even if you give the spelling , I don't think I can understand what it is. Beside, don't use Chinese Characters to spell any other language's voice unless there is a usage of oral speaking in Chinese.Just write what it is and explain it in Chinese in (). Like this: ...


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