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20

Even for educated Chinese people who know English fairly well, they do not use the same method that native English speakers use (the one mentioned in your question). The common methods Chinese use include: 1 - Read a small sequence of letters from the alphabet that contains the letter in question. “Theodore怎么拼?” “T-H-...” “等一下,是T还是P” “T,R-S-T的T" 2 - ...


14

I would use 什么, or 什么什么 as the placeholder for the characters I can't read. In your exmaple, I would say: 北京 什么 西 什么, or 北京 什么什么 西 什么什么, or 北京 什么 西 什么什么, or 北京 什么什么 西 什么. 什么 or 什么什么 can substitute any numbers of characters. I am from Northern China, and I am not sure what words people in other regions in China would use for this purpose.


12

等等 is the official and only globally recognized way to read ellipsis in Chinese, unlike in English there are more than one (et cetera, and so on, and so forth, etc.) In casual occasions you can also say 等 for short. In formal speeches like news broadcast it's always 等等. (Note I am talking about the pronunciation of ellipsis; I am not saying single 等 or ...


8

Their meanings are somewhat different. In a few situations, they are interchangeable, but there are many others where you can only use one and not the other. The key difference is that 呗 is much more assertive, even rhetorical, whereas 吧 can be used to express doubt or uncertainty as well. For completeness I'll cover them all. Definitions taken from zdic....


8

well, this answer is "limited" only, in relation to poetry in 唐 dynasty & cantonese. 1 cantonese (and several southern dialects/languages) is highly correlated to middle chinese, which was used in 唐 dynasty. 2 cantonese still has 入聲 (entering tone), while mandarin lost it. e.g. 屋 uk1 sound file 沃 yuk1 sound file 燭 juk1 sound file in mandarin, ...


7

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_exclamative_particles But use of exclamative particles is highly informal, and it is advised that they not be used in formal documents or academic papers, unless it is specifically required to do so (such as the case of narrative telling). Some common examples are shown below. 了 le modal particle intensifying ...


7

To begin with, there is one thing called 大写 (daxie, “upper case”), in contrast to 小写 (xiaoxie, “lower case”). 小写:一二三四五六七八九十百千 - 元 大写:壹贰叁肆伍陆柒捌玖拾佰仟 - 圆 Daxie numbers are only used in finance in order to protect against falsification, because they contain too many strokes to modify. For example, 一 can be easily modified to 二 or 十, but 壹 cannot be ...


6

In Cantonese, 我爸爸 and 我媽媽 are perfectly fine to use to refer to your parents, no matter what your age is. They are neither rigid nor childish. Slightly more familiar terms are 我阿爸 and 我阿媽. In a very formal context, You can also say 我父母. To address them directly, most people use 爸爸 and 媽媽, or 阿爸 and 阿媽, depending on which their family prefers. 父親 and 母親 are ...


6

This is incorrect. Cantonese is a modern language just like Mandarin, English and every single other modern language is. Exactly speaking, Tang Dynasty poetry were pronounced back then in Tang Dynasty Chinese, which is called Middle Chinese. Middle Chinese is different from any single existing Chinese language, and all contemporary Chinese languages have ...


6

I would argue that mutual intelligibility between Chinese speakers 2200 years apart would be essentially nothing, for the spoken language. I say 2200 years as the emperor in the film is the Dragon Emperor, or Qin Shi Huang, who lived 259 to 210 BC and founded the Qin dynasty. To give you an idea, Old Chinese (~1250 BC to 25 AD) did not have tones (Old ...


5

NS.X. answer is correct. I am just going to add one extra point about <<……>> in writing. If one is to convert <<……>> to words in writing, other than 等等 One can use 等+category Using OP example 北海、頤和園、香山…… 北海、颐和园、香山…… 北海, 頤和園, 香山 are all places/location Can be converted to (1) 北海、頤和園、香山等等 北海、颐和园、香山等等 Or (2) 北海、頤和園、...


5

水巷孑蠻 and Rethliopuks gave quite a lot of details. But this does not address quite right to the question. Read the origin question: "It was related to me that Tang Dynasty poetry is meant to be pronounced in the style of the Cantonese dialect. Is this correct, incorrect, or a subject of contention?" The question is not about the actual pronunciation in Tang ...


5

流行音乐歌唱的大都是男女爱情、歌词贴近生活、通俗易懂、易于传唱、受到欢迎、不足为怪。 There are punctuation issues in this sentence. A way to modify it is: 流行音乐歌唱的大都是男女爱情、歌词贴近生活、通俗易懂、易于传唱、受到欢迎不足为怪。 We can also replace 顿号(、) with 逗号(,): 流行音乐歌唱的大都是男女爱情,歌词贴近生活,通俗易懂,易于传唱,受到欢迎不足为怪。 The sentence should be read as: [流行音乐] /歌唱的/大都是/男女爱情,歌词贴近生活,通俗易懂,易于传唱,受到欢迎不足为怪。 It's topic + comment structure. The ...


4

There are a lot of Cantonese dictionaries online. The one I often use is CantoDict. It is volunteer-contributed and is pretty comprehensive. I has both characters and words, and has pronunciation for both Cantonese in Jyutping and Mandarin in pinyin, meanings in English. and you can search based on characters, Jyutping, pinyin, or English. Once you get the ...


4

The difference between "in" and "ing" is in the ending sound. Say "in", hold it for a second or two, and feel the position of your tongue. Your tongue should be in the front, touching the roof of your mouth just behind your front teeth. Then say "ing", and do the same. Your tongue should be at the back of your mouth. Try to hear the difference in sound when ...


4

It will come with more exposure. Watch movies/shows, listen to music, talk with people via voice-chat or in person. One of the ways I trained myself to recognize the tones is to listen to the same tone, but with different sounds. For example: biao1 shen1 zhong1 ying1 then he2 ma2 qie2 liu2 etc. I found this was really helpful when trying to become more ...


4

I've heard at least two versions personally. One is to use the English reading of "at". The other is "圈(儿)a". Meaning "a" with a circle around it. It might be different in different regions.


4

As pointed out by @Daniel Yeung above, they call it 小老鼠 (Xiao3 Lao3 Shu3)in Taiwan, which means 'little mouse'. Takes a little imagination to see the resemblance. I think that is precisely what you heard over the phone.


4

A noun becomes a verb, this phenomenon exists in many human languages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthimeria For example, - How can I contact you? - You can message me. / You can send me a message. "message me" in Chinese is "发短信给我" or "给我发短信" "发" is the verb but "短信我" make sense too. If you speak "你可以短信我", Chinese people can understand very well. ...


4

流行音乐歌唱的大都是男女爱情、歌词贴近生活、通俗易懂、易于传唱、受到欢迎、不足为怪。 [流行音乐歌] - topic [唱的大都是男女爱情, 歌词贴近生活]- comment that describes the topic The comment continues with an opinion: [通俗易懂,易于传唱] - stating reasons for the opinion [受到欢迎 不足为怪] - stating the opinion You can add conjunctions and word particles to connect the clauses more smoothly. But pausing between phrases to emphasize ...


4

像话么,你? It is a rhetorical question, and it is not a dialect. Pretty much everyone use this. You thoughts about 像话么,你 is correct. Let's look back to sentences before that 我是花钱买服务的,我整整坐了12个小时的飞机,我需要休息。你知道吗?小心点,这箱子很贵啊!你赔不起,我告诉你。我告诉你 我要投诉你们,你看别人都拿着个牌子举着等人。早早地就来了,你倒好,恨不得。干脆这样吧。你给我地址,我拿着牌子去接你好了, All above is bunch of complain and sarcasm, and so she asked “don't ...


4

In this context, "托" means the person who pretend to involve an activity or to support someone to perform a scam typically. It is related to 衬托, but derogatory sense only.


4

the actual Cantonese words well, some argued that it’s 歇 (u+6b47) in toishan “dialect” (台山話) <https://jonathanovsky.wordpress.com/2015/02/14/再談「hea」字/> we just use “hea” to write it, no han-chinese / cantonese character is accepted, as the “original”: one of the urban myth in hong kong 🇭🇰


3

It's difficult for westerners to master the four tones in a few days, but if you have a few months, you can try! It's also difficult to learn how to read Chinese characters, but you can memorize some common words in a few days, such as restaurant, hotel, supermarket, museum, park etc, so that you can know where to go (most places have English signs in ...


3

The best way is to install a Cantonese input plugin for your computer/phone. I have jyutping (粵拼) installed both on my Mac and Android phone. Works great. I use this to write both in Cantonese and (broken) Mandarin.


3

广州话方言词典 2010 Comerical Press 8,453 (approx.) entries Is a good place to start. For instance the entry for 係 1 是 係唔係? 是不是? 你係邊個? 你是誰? 係就話係。 是就說是。 2 只有(與“至”配搭着用) 係你佢至服 只有你他才服 係噉至好。 只有這樣才好。 Not only does it have written Cantonese for the individual words but also example sentences with mandarin translations. Words without characters are marked with a: □. -- ...


3

I just want to expand on what is being said in the comments about context. One of the problems of speaking a language other than your first language is getting across the point of what you are trying to say, not just saying your main point but making yourself fully understood. Think about this in the context of English. If you were going to say "Yesterday I ...


3

Here are a few suggestions: Locally: Try meetups for group exchanges and whatnot - http://chinese.meetup.com/ Online: italki have teachers and tutors you can practice with - http://www.italki.com/teachers/tutoring/chinese. Or if you are up for a bit less structure, there is Skype Language rooms [http://education.skype.com] Mobile: Wechat [微信] This is a ...


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