13

There are some recent open source efforts that have opened this up a bit. One is hanzi writer, which was based on the data for 3195 strokes contained in ZDT but now uses the more complete character data from make me a hanzi demo. It uses javascript to draw and animate the strokes, directly from json versions of the character path data. Update: Recently, the ...


7

As @deutschZuid mentioned in his comment, the component in 乘 that you mention is technically not its radical. The "radical" refers specifically to which component the character is classified under in dictionaries, which in this case is 丿. But anyway, to answer your question, the 丬 component in 妆 and 装 and the component that looks like that in 乘 have ...


6

I believe for 印 the 1st one is correct. 氏 is written in this order: . The first 3 strokes are exactly same as those first 3 stroks in 印. Consider the following characters: 卯, 留,齊(齐). We finish this part first, , then add the next strokes, which are 丿, 丶, and ㇏ respectively. But if you make the font of 印 like this, the 2nd order in your question is correct. ...


6

I just started a project to make such a font. You can find it here: http://rtega.be/chmn/index.php?subpage=68


5

About this question, you can consult Guobao Wang's summary: 1.只有横折钩类与撇相遇:先写横折钩,例刀、力、万 、方、乃、杨。 2.其他横折类与撇相遇:都先写撇,例如及(横折折撇 ),几(横折弯),九(横斜钩)、匕(竖折弯)。 translate into English: 1.Only when uppermost and rightmost lines with a left hook cross with right-to-left diagonals(ノ): uppermost and rightmost lines with a left hook is written first. For example: "刀", "...


5

The order of strokes affects the "evolution" of the character when writing in high speed. In high speed the character shape shifts and one can often recognize the character even after extreme deformation because the general flow of the character is there. But if the stroke orders are changed, the deformation doesn't conform to the expected shape and it may ...


4

There isn't an official stroke order for each character, but only a subset of all characters used, and official stroke order exists solely for the purpose of educating schoolchildren. Japanese stroke order is actually not as fixed as Chinese, and the only reason it feels that Japanese stroke order is more fixed is because Japanese textbooks or dictionaries ...


4

I think you are making something wrong. In Chinese characters, there are many different kinds of strokes 横(一)、竖(丨)、撇(丿)、点(丶)、捺(㇏)、折(亅). Directions are only one of the differences. If you only cares about its directions, you cannot write the strokes properly. In the ancient China, people use ink brushes instead of pens or pencils, and ink brushes are more ...


4

Do you talk about the method of writing 辶? The difference is caused by the typeface or font. 明体 楷书


4

It is a rarely used Chinese character. It has two pronunciation: "zhǎn" and "zhàn". English meaning: to open, to stretch; to extend, to unfold; to dilate; to prolong. The radical of 㠭 is 工, such as the radical of 林 or 森 is 木. The stroke order of 㠭 is If you want to learn more common stroke orders of Chinese characters, I recommend to read learn Chinese ...


3

You can look in zhongwen.com for character analysis. I've heard they may not always agree with other experts, but I like it. Just click search and put the pinyin in the box, it gives you a break down of most characters. The 'logic' may be lost in history!


3

As a matter of fact, stroke direction changes don't happen that much. In this particular case,舌(she2) is borrowed only for sound in the character 舍(she4), which means house (there is a roof radical on top). In Chinese, around 80% of the characters are the composition of picture + sound (because there are not that many pictographs to represent everything, ...


3

I usually look up this dictionary for stroke orders. There could be some other useful sites like this one. I personally apply the second order for 再 and 里 as you quoted. In practice, the stroke order doesn't really matter and you can develop your own stylish based on the standard one. For native speakers, we would only be taught and tested the standard ...


2

There's nothing wrong with the website. The following picture showes the "辶"(Simplified Chinese) in different fonts and characters. Accually although the "辶" sometimes looks different and a little bit strange, it is always same and there's no exception. It's assembled by three parts (as the second line in the picture) and you can follwing the third line in ...


2

Am I missing something? you need to distinguish a resource is reliable, or, dubious 😸 the ministry of education, taiwan 🇹🇼 maintained a site for learning stroke order: https://stroke-order.learningweb.moe.edu.tw/characters.do?lang=zh_TW 爾: https://stroke-order.learningweb.moe.edu.tw/charactersQueryResult.do?words=爾&lang=zh_TW&csrfPreventionSalt=...


1

I've been using a code made by ThoreBor (check out his anki addons for Chinese learning, they're really useful) that inputs stroke order animations onto my stroke order cards https://github.com/ThoreBor/Hanzi-Writer-for-Anki/blob/master/anki_hanzi_writer_without_dropdown.html It uses the animations from hanziwriter.org . I'm also using the Fluent Forever ...


1

This site is quite good. It doesn't contain any ancient Flash or Java components, and displays the character in complete stroke order in one single static image, or animation if you prefer. https://strokeorder.com.tw/ Although the interface is in Chinese, it's easy to understand, you put a character in the text field and click the magnifying glass button ...


1

A free option is TOFU Learn which is what I've been using for years. It has the HSK decks already available, and it's simple enough to write your own (and import the pinyin and definitions from CC-EDICT etc.). I'm unwilling to pay for Skritter (which is undoubtedly better) simply because it's too expensive when there is a perfectly good free alternative. ...


1

I take advantage of both Pleco and Skritter. I use Pleco for looking up the meaning of Chinese words and use Skritter to save words then play games with words I've saved before to remember stroke order and components of Chinese characters


1

I know of two apps: Pleco with Stroke Order Add-on Pleco is a comprehensive free Chinese app with many paid-for add-ons. IIRC, you can download a free trial of the stroke order. estroke This is a dedicated paid-for stroke order app. It also pronounces the name of the stroke while drawing the character. I find the interface messy. PS: Which system do you ...


1

Have you tried Skritter? They offer: Handwriting Recognition With Skritter you write characters in your browser and get real-time grading. Which sounds like what you are looking for.


1

The correct answer came from user6065 in a comment above. I wanted to make it clear to others as well, it is discussed in detail here: The characters 女、火、长 ,丑 have a historical stroke order that differs from the current recommended order and are simply learnt.


1

Just wanna say, it is not very important, as long as you keep the general rule: left to right, top to down. It is OK however you write it!


1

Wow, I didn't know stroke orders differ between mainland China and Taiwan too. I'm from Taiwan and @dan is from China I assume. I was taught using the first order both for 里 and 再. So apparently the first is Taiwanese version, and the second is Chinese version.


1

The keyword to search for is 筆順編號. This github respository contains stroke order sequences for 29685 characters, coded as numbers 1-5. From the readme: 仅仅以1、2、3、4、5五个数字分别代表“一丨丿丶𠃌”五个笔画,按汉字笔顺进行输入。例如: “开”字,按笔顺“一、一、丿、丨”,编码为1132; “我”字为31;“向”字为325;“力”为53; 注意“万”为153,“方”为4153,“忄”为442。 其中有些笔画容易被误解: “提”归为“一”:如“氵、扌”中的最后一笔;有些电脑字体繁体字的“雨字头”四点显示为四小横,皆按国标笔顺归为四点; “亅”...


1

There are general guidelines listed in the Stroke order article at Wikipedia. Even still, there are varying standards (also noted by that same article) on what is considered the "correct" stroke order. The article goes into further detail on some of the differences, but practically speaking, the guidelines should generally serve you well.


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