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12

1) 'biang' Well, the first one that came to my mind is 'biang', as in 'biang biang mian' - which a quick Wikipedia search shows has 58 strokes. This is still in some use (and I've seen it in restaurants), if that means anything to you. It is not, however, found in dictionaries. 2) 'zhe' Sadly however, biang doesn't have the most strokes (although I would ...


7

The Unicode standard put one character into one code point, but the character can be written differently in simplified Chinese, traditional Chinese, Japanese or Korean(oh, they don't use characters now, only Hangul). From the Unicode website, you can download a list of all characters, with their origin local standard and shape. A example for character "直" is ...


5

To start off,「木」is not supposed to have detached legs and end up looking like「朩」. In one of the most stringent glyph standards, Kangxi Dictionary style Ming (Serif), if the Shuowen small seal shape contains「木」, then it does not have detached legs. This is for glyph shape fidelity reasons, and conversely, if it has detached legs, you can be certain that, at ...


4

To answer the queries directly: Are all of these different styles of the same characters used in China as well, or are they specific to Japan? Is it important for me to learn about them (i.e. learn both shapes of 令 or 直)? Note that Traditional Chinese fonts (like MingLiu) will often have different versions from Simplified Chinese ones for the same ...


4

Characters in the first image are the same(same meaning, same pronunciation). They are variants(we call them 异体字,异:different, 体 body, form, 字: character) of the same character, however, Japan and China select different form as standard form. On the computer, using the proper fonts will solve this problem. Read this wiki article to find more such variants. In ...


4

There is such handwriting in calligraphy works of Tang Yin (唐寅, also well known as 唐伯虎, Tang Bohu, 1470-1524, Ming Dynasty). I found some pictures of his writing, 《落花诗册》. I marked the related characters with a mark to the right. The genuine writing is now in Suzhou Museum, Jiangsu Province.


4

First of all, whether the stroke is a shu is out of the question -- it is not a vertical and long stroke, but typically tilted and short. Regarding the difference between dian and pie, I must call your attention to CJKV strokes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stroke_(CJKV_character) Note in stroke "d" (dian) there are two versions, left and right, but both ...


4

It is a rarely used Chinese character. It has two pronunciation: "zhǎn" and "zhàn". English meaning: to open, to stretch; to extend, to unfold; to dilate; to prolong. The radical of 㠭 is 工, such as the radical of 林 or 森 is 木. The stroke order of 㠭 is If you want to learn more common stroke orders of Chinese characters, I recommend to read learn Chinese ...


3

Wubihua input method. You can find this on older chinese phones hardware keys, or with a software keyboard on smartphones. It consists of just 5 buttons, each representing a basic stroke type. You tap them in the order of writing and suggestions of the most likely character come up. My personal favourite is multiling keyboard on Android. I have no idea how ...


3

Actually we only use the name ( the second ones in your question) which describes the shape of the radical. It's how teachers call these radicals in classroom. Many radicals, like 丶, are not treated as charterers. Although they may have a pronunciation, most Chinese don't know that. Even for these radicals which happen to be characters, we still incline to ...


2

横 (heng2) is its own character, as is 竖 (shu4). 一 and 丨are never pronounced as heng2 and shu4, but the shapes are referred to in context of discussing calligraphy, stroke order, etc. Here's an analogy with the letter "o". Is it a circle? Yes. Do we ever read it as "circle"? No. But just like "o" is a circle-shaped letter, 一 is a 横-shaped character. In ...


2

Radicals are not building blocks of characters, they're dictionary entry organisation headers. They're equivalent to the first letter in an English word. The radicals are chosen so that some characters are easily and obviously grouped under these headers, but some radicals are very arbitrary (see e.g. Radical 4 and the characters grouped under it). The ...


2

Under which regional standard are you studying your characters? That'll be your answer. Note: 橫 is a 隸書 style, and no region really writes it like that. You'll see Japanese people write 戶 with a 橫 instead, and that's where the influence comes from.


1

This site is quite good. It doesn't contain any ancient Flash or Java components, and displays the character in complete stroke order in one single static image, or animation if you prefer. https://strokeorder.com.tw/ Although the interface is in Chinese, it's easy to understand, you put a character in the text field and click the magnifying glass button ...


1

烏 specifically referring to 'crow' 鳥 referring to 'bird' in general. There are many 'bird' related characters, but I don't know any 'crow' related character 鴨(duck)、鵝(goose)、鶴(crane)、鷹(eagle)、鴉(crow) are all bird, but only 鴉 is crow 烏 also means 'black' because all crows are black, we even have an idiom '天下烏鴉一般黑' pointing out this fact


1

The keyword to search for is 筆順編號. This github respository contains stroke order sequences for 29685 characters, coded as numbers 1-5. From the readme: 仅仅以1、2、3、4、5五个数字分别代表“一丨丿丶𠃌”五个笔画,按汉字笔顺进行输入。例如: “开”字,按笔顺“一、一、丿、丨”,编码为1132; “我”字为31;“向”字为325;“力”为53; 注意“万”为153,“方”为4153,“忄”为442。 其中有些笔画容易被误解: “提”归为“一”:如“氵、扌”中的最后一笔;有些电脑字体繁体字的“雨字头”四点显示为四小横,...


1

There are quite a few here: We could start a list, just for fun: 情人,人情 手枪,枪手 水泥,泥水 产生,生产 However, what if the characters remain the same, but the tone changes? The meaning alters, so is that an anagram? Like: 精神? If you just consider the pinyin, jingshen will throw up quite a few results in different tone and character combinations. Are they anagrams? ...


1

Why do you need that? We never use that in China. However, palindrome is more often to see but it is still rare. You might see palindrome in ancient Chinese literary poetry composition or in 对联.


1

have a look of this pictures: 10th stroke is: 11th stroke is: 12th stroke is: 14th stroke is: 15th stroke is: 16th stroke is: voila, 16 strokes :)


1

This is a common 略字 (abbreviated character) used in Japan mostly for handwriting.


1

it ought to be 门(U+95e8), the simplified of 門, somehow your browser used a japanese font for font substitution. if you manually change the display font, it should change back to 门. i think that it's not a case of variant character.


1

It might be the written form of this character in some other regions. This is more likely to be a locale problem on your browser. Chinese characters (a.k.a CJK unified ideographs in Unicode) are not only used in China. In different regions, the same characters can be written in different shapes. Fonts for Chinese character is those regions will reflect ...


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