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1, "Self-respect" and "self-esteem" are quite similar and related even in English. Definitions of "self-esteem" by major dictionaries: American Heritage Dictionary 5th: Pride in oneself; self-respect. Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 2015: a confidence and satisfaction in oneself : self-respect World Book Dictionary, ...


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Both 自尊 and 自重 mean "self-respect", however, depending on the usages, there are slight differences in meaning. The former is heavily associated with "personal pride" and the latter emphasis more on "value and restraint". The sentences below show the uses of each and the differences. 人沒有了自尊就沒有了一切. - Without self-respect, "...


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The more I look at "self-respect", the more I feel it is a word and a concept that Chinese language doesn't really have a counterpart. First of all, this is a sweeping statement. When I first read this, I was thinking, do you mean Chinese have no concept of self-respect? Or do you mean Chinese do not know how to respect themselves? And what do you ...


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Well if you recall - blue is somewhat a new color to us and wasn't actually seen until modern times. So this makes sense for why the same word that had meant "black" became also the word for "blue". (I say in this order as, clearly as consideration of this information shows, the odds of it having been first "blue" and then ...


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青 does not mean black in modern Chinese (likely due to semantic transition). It can mean black in classical Chinese, but that does not mean its meaning is ambiguous either, given the context is understood. Consider the following: 君不見高堂明鏡悲白髮,朝如青絲暮成雪。——李白《將進酒》 This verse by the Tang poet Li Bai laments how one's hair becomes white overnight. We see 青絲 as a ...


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