We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

17

Q is Chinese slang for "chewy", similar to al dente in texture. You can see it in example phrases such as "Q感十足" (very chewy). You would expect foods such as tapioca pearls, gelatinous candies, pasta, or rice to be described as "Q". From my experience, this term is more popular in Taiwan and Hong Kong and less so in the mainland. I have not seen this term ...


11

I am Taiwanese, and I have even had this "餅乾" once. Generally, we can refer to almost every snack that is made with flour and "cracks" in your mouth as 餅乾. So when you say you want some 餅乾, people will not only give you crackers, but also cookies, potato chips, wafer cookies, wafer rolls, mille feuille, etc. These things have their own specific names, of ...


10

Q is Hokkien. The character is「食邱」and pronounced ㄎㄧㄨ (kiu, same as "Q"). The Chinese definition is 軟靭 ruǎn rèn (soft and tough) and means the texture of food being chewy. See the post "Q(k‘iu⊦)──軟靭" on the "taiwanlanguage" blog.


10

Although I don't speak Hakka (one of my PhD advisors studied a Hong Kong Hakka dialect, so I have a vague idea about it) I live surrounded by Hakka people, in Guangdong, and I go frequently to Taiwan for work. In Taiwan, I noticed that the HSR announcements in Hakka sounded very different from the "regular" Hakka I can hear in Guangdong. There's a bunch of ...


9

As recorded in Baidu, this unique pronunciation of “和” as "hàn" actually originates from the Old Beijing dialect. Extracted from the blog article titled 台湾人为嘛把“和”读作hàn?, it says the following: 1945年10月台湾光复,日语的“国语”黯然退出,台胞急着要回复祖国的语文,要说国语,要认汉字。 1946年4月2日台湾省国语推行委员会正式成立。台湾国语会的标志性贡献是编订《国音标准汇编》,作为推行标准国语的根据。1946年5月1日起,由“老北京”齐铁根先生每日在清晨7时,在电台担任“国语读音示范”,播讲民众国语读本、...


8

According to one of the rumours, the first cellphone was used and introduced by Sammo Hung, which is the elder kung-fu brother of Jackie Chan. Since at that time Hong Kong entertainment was fairly respected in nearly the whole East and Southeast Asia, most people showed their respect to call Jackie Chan as 大哥 and his elder kung-fu brother Sammo Hung as 大哥大. ...


8

Here are some more examples of this style of adjective: 好吃 = 不错吃 好玩 = 不错玩 好用 = 不错用 好喝 = 不错喝 These terms are extremely common in Taiwanese Mandarin, however their origins are unclear. I suspect it's due to a mix of Taiwanese terms and errors in translation. Let's take one example, the 不錯吃 phrase. At first glance it seems to be an incorrect ...


8

小确幸 is borrowed from Japanese 小確幸, which is created by the Japanese novelist 村上春树 (Haruki Murakami) in his collection of essays ランゲルハンス島の午後 (兰格汉斯岛的午后, Afternoon in the Islets of Langerhans). In Japanese, it means 小さいけれども、確かな幸福, you can translate it as little but certain happiness same as here. And according to here, 村上春樹の造語「小確幸」(しょうかっこう)は本作品の原題 "A ...


7

Yes, people use ‘kuài’ in conversation, as in ‘yī qiān duō kuài’ (over 1,000 NT$). You can also add ‘qián’ to make it clear you’re talking about amounts of money: ‘wŭ shí kuài qián’ (50 NT$). You might want to use ‘(xīn) tái bì’ when changing money, as in ‘qĭng gĕi wŏ tái bì’ (please give me Taiwan dollars). I don’t know what was used in previous periods,...


7

As many have said the "proper" way to refer to the currency of Taiwan is 新台币 (Xīn tái bì) which is literally broken down to 新 (Xīn) = New and 台币 (tái bì) = Taiwan Dollars Old Taiwan dollars are referred to as 舊臺幣* (旧台币) (jiù tái bì) However you would only refer to them by these proper names when dealing with multiple currencies. When referring to ...


7

In this occasion, 不会 means "no problem"


7

We don't use 補 or 縫補 in Taiwan. We use 修改衣服 instead. When you like to get the clothes mended, you should find the 修改衣服/換拉鏈 (Modify clothes/Change zippers) signs as follows. We still call the person who does these works 老闆.


7

maybe "大中華區". most multinational corporations used this term to describe the regions you mentioned. such usage is correct, in context of nowadays, or recent decades. historically, taiwan was integrated into the chinese empire after ~1683. before that time, formosa was colonised by the dutch, spanish. history of taiwan last, and most importantly is: how ...


6

When to reply to "thanks/thank you", In China mainland, you can say > 不客气/别客气/没事儿/客气什么(啥)啊/这算什么(啥)/小事 In Hongkong, you can say > 唔使客气/唔紧要 Only in Taiwan, you say > 不会 (all expressions used in mainland are also understandable in Taiwan) Remind: If you say 不会 in China Mainland when replying to "thanks / thankyou", people get ...


6

It is a similar pronunciation of Hokkien 感謝/感谢, so the meaning is to thank. The 臺灣閩南語常用詞辭典 shows that the pronunciation is kám-siā. It is a style of humor, not a joke. We use them a lot. Another example is 蝦米/虾米. It is the similar pronunciation of Hokkien 什麼/什么 (what). This one has been spread to China already.


6

焿 is a character on its own. ZDic:http://www.zdic.net/z/1d/js/713F.htm gēng 〔~子寮湾〕地名。在中国台湾省东北海岸。 Wiktionary: https://zh.wiktionary.org/zh-hans/%E7%84%BF “焿”是“羹”的异体字,为台湾本地自创的形声俗字。 羹 means '(thick) soup, broth'.


5

Still should be shan1 but probably they have some 翘舌音 problems, i.e. cant pronounce ch, sh, zh etc. A lot of Chinese variants don't have 翹舌音 so these pronunciations become problematic. Count it as an accent.


5

I am a Taiwanese, this song is really famous when I was a child. :) In here 算什么 is a phrase to disparage something. The complete usage of 算什么 is 算是什么. (算=>算是) 算是 can represent is (a member of) something.(but not so sure or you're telling someone who may not know this.) in English. For example, 不要這樣捉弄他,這算是一種霸凌 => Don't make fun of him like that, it ...


5

Here's a list of books from Taiwan on this topic: 兩岸現代漢語常用詞典 普通話vs.國語--兩岸對話一本就通 最新兩岸用詞差異對照手冊 最新兩岸用語速查1600 兩岸常用詞語對照手冊:兩岸交流即時通 兩岸詞語即時通 兩岸用語快譯通


5

Actually, until around the 1990s, the spoken language in official sources were very similar. Famous singers like Teresa Teng spoke pretty much like people from China nowadays. Here's an example of an interviewee from those earlier days: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWEcZvhfnzA&hd=1 (There's a great quote about how Teresa Teng's songs brought comfort ...


5

I'm from Taiwan. 不會 in this context essentially means "No trouble at all", "I didn't really do much". It's just another humble/polite expression we like to use. And saying 不會 is quicker and easier to pronounce than 不客氣 in my opinion. When I first(?!) heard the expression/usage form my classmate in high school, I felt that it was very polite and ...


4

Many people in Hong Kong use Quick aka 速成 or Simplified Cangjie. There is a wiki link for this input method:Simplified Cangjie There is a build-in Quick IME in Windows and Mac. Most of the Quick users use it. Quick users type Chinese using Quick on smartphone too, as the build-in IME of smartphone that selling in Hong Kong usually support Quick. However, ...


4

Many Taiwanese do not discriminate the phoneme pairs like z/zh, c/ch, s/sh. This is because their mother language, Taiwanese Minnan, does not compose of those retroflective sounds like zh, ch, sh. This is not a problem if those syllables carrying these phonemes are embedded in a multisyllabic words, like 阿里山。 Both a-li-shan or a-li-san are OK for local ...


4

Use 女士 with her family name is always safest. e.g. 李女士


4

yes, fx, 他会来吗?是的,他会来。 yes,it depends on the context. we use extra word to express the confidence, fx.'一定',‘必然’。


4

This is because Taiwanese Hokkien doesn't have its own official written form. It has a romanization, but none of the Taiwanese know it, despite most speaking the language fluently. So when they want to express something in Taiwanese while writing, they would either use ZhuYin 注音, or for the more common words, Chinese characters that sound similar in ...


4

Mandarin originally refer to the official language of Qing By the end of the last dynasty in 19th century, the government of KMT released some standard of 国语(national language), which is based on the 官话(mandarin) of the Qing dynasty. When KMT went to Taiwan, they bring the standard there. On the other side, PRC made the standard 普通话(common language), which ...


4

As can be gleaned from the fact that it is usually represented in Zhuyin, ㄎㄧㄤ is a bit of slang used primarily in Taiwan, especially among young people. ㄎ with ㄧ (or k + i in Pinyin) is not a legitimate combination of sounds for modern Mandarin, so it's not likely to have originated there. Its primary meaning is hard to pin down, but "goofy" (see for ...


4

你有想要买什么吗. It sounds more like Taiwanese usage of 有 to my ear. I found they often put 有 between subject and verb. E.g. 我有去过;我有看过;where I often just say 我去过;我看过. In this case, I'll probably say 你想要买什么? or 你想要买什么(东西)吗?.


3

It just means frighteningly/terrifying in your situation. Your passenger is just scared by your little stunts (but he/she may be amazed by your moves at the same time). 恐怖 and 可怕 do not have the meaning of poorly.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible