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9

I like your use of 飛揚 here. While it is comical or cultural to use an otherwise unrelated word to signify an elision – e.g., consider 醬子 in place of 這樣子 in Taiwanese Mandarin internet slang – if you are looking for an answer of more academic rigour, IPA should be used, not Chinese characters or pinyin. (Because after elision, what you spell may not always be ...


7

The key to this question is which accent of Taiwan you're talking about. There is a large difference between Standard Taiwan Mandarin (標準台灣國語) and the various accents commonly found across Taiwan. There certainly are accents where there is absolutely no distinction between ㄕ (sh) vs ㄙ (s), ㄓ (zh) vs ㄗ (z), ㄔ (ch) vs ㄘ (c), ㄖ (r) vs ㄌ (l). The latter of each ...


2

Tl;dr: because of the inferential nature of the construction 不像⋯⋯有, the phrase that expresses the idea of unlikeness is essential to understanding. A syntactically loyal (but less idiomatic in English) translation is The entrance (in Taiwan) is unlike Japan's having a step for separating an area for the entryway. So it is better to consider 日本有隔出玄關範圍的高低差 ...


2

門口不像日本有隔出玄關範圍的高低差 Some object is omitted (這)[門口] [不像日本(的門口)(那樣)] [有] [隔出玄關範圍的][高低差] (This)[door], [unlike Japan('s doors) (which)] [have] [that separate the entrance area ][height difference] This door, unlike Japanese doors which have a height difference that separates the entrance area It implies 這門口沒有高低差 (this door has no height difference) Break ...


2

It is just a name, whoever named this fruit deemed it mythically good. Put exaggerated words in commercial goods' names is a common practice. There's a Toronto car repairman nicknamed himself 車神 (god of cars) to brag about his godly car repairing skill, you can't take names like these literally The funny thing is, just like 地瓜 (sweet potato) is not a 瓜 (...


2

Wikipedia has an entire page entitled, Peaches of Immortality, where it gives an explanation to the term: In Chinese mythology, Peaches of Immortality (Chinese: 仙桃; pinyin: xiāntáo; Cantonese Yale: sīn tòuh or Chinese: 蟠桃; pinyin: pántáo; Cantonese Yale: pùhn tòuh) are consumed by the immortals due to their mystic virtue of conferring longevity on all who ...


1

Using the modern rules of Pinyin the name should be written: Cai Yingwen Capitalization only applies to the first letter in a proper noun. The surname and the personal name are separated: Pinyin.info | 2.3 Personal Names Personal names are written with the surname and the given name separated, and with each of the two components capitalized. Remember as ...


1

Duke University hosts a: Character Conversion Table that may be of good reference for you. ㄧㄨㄥ = yi + weng ㄩㄥ = yong I'd highly recommend not using yellowbridge.


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