8

You can use '表舅', because he is your mother's '表哥'. Basically I think there are three prefixes that you can add to relationship words: '亲' (directly/closely related, which is usually omitted), '堂', '表'. All your ancestors, siblings (that share at least father or mother with you), and descendant are '亲'. '堂' only refers to your father's brothers' children. ...


7

As far as I know, 小姐 (xiao3jie3) is not very appreciated anymore by waitresses, even in Beijing; they might even be offended because that is how girls who sell their bodies are addressed. That is how Chinese people explained it to me. Waiters, be it male or female, are addressed as 服务员 (fu2wu4yuan2) and it is safe to call them that.


7

Taxi / Bus driver "师傅, 我要去天安门." all the manual workers "师傅, 我想做一个木头大象" "Mr.Carpenter, I wanna make a wooden elephant." "师傅, 你能搬动大象吗?." "Mrs.Porter, Can you lift an elephant?" "师傅, 我要给我的大象烫个头发" "Miss Barber, My elephant needs a perm" Note: not used in high class barbershop "师傅, 我不是坏人" "Mr. Entrance Guard, I am not bad." In real life, ...


6

Formally, the Chinese title was President - that is, the English word President was transliterated into Chinese as 伯理璽天德. From the Treaty of Wanghia (望廈條約): 以上關涉太平、和好、貿易、海面各款條約,應候各大臣奏明大清大皇帝批准,大合眾國大伯理璽天德既得各國選舉國會長公會大臣議定允肯批准... The present Treaty of peace, amity, and commerce, shall be ratified and approved by the President of the United States, by and with ...


6

嫂 means "sister-in-law" 杨二嫂 means "wife of the second son of the Yang family". It doesn't matter if you are the elder son or third son in the Yang family, she is still 二嫂 (second sister-in-law) to you. The character 二 here doesn't indicate older or younger, it indicates the second born. Outsiders would call her 杨二嫂 to indicate they are ...


6

How to address a person properly depends on a lot factors, but as the rule of thumb, Chinese people like to use 2 characters to address a person. The reason is that, I guess - 1) using 1 character from the given name sounds intimate (like between lovers), 2) using the person's 1-character surname sound foreign. In English, if a person's surname is Wang, ...


5

I have posed this question to dozens of Chinese people. I think that copying their responses is against the community regulations, but I have observed several things: 女生 While this is always identified as Taiwanese it was never identified as offensive and was the best practical solution for me, because I could always point to my Taiwanese family. 姑娘 ...


5

In my opinion, if you are adult and the person who droppd wallet is: younger than 11, you can call him or her "小朋友"; at the age of 11 to 18, you can call him or her "同学"; at the age of 18 to 24, you can call him "同学", "帅哥(cool man)", and call her "同学", "美女(beautiful girl)"; at the age of 24 to 35, you can call him "帅哥", and call her "美女"; older than 30, it ...


4

Were some people in the past actually known just by names like 张三? Yes. It is the official name of some people, not just one. Some female even names as 张三妹. Bu the way 刘三姐 is a very famous movie. 张三, 李四, etc. are not nicknames, they are real names, they are also used as a "any one" placeholder, as in the answer of other question. For example, 你到那儿去,认识谁是张三,...


4

To be honest, although you could use 学弟, 学妹, etc. to address other students, the most natural way of addressing them (especially when you interact face to face) is by full name. Full names retain a reasonable amount of respect without making it sound too formal. Adding a suffix would only make it overly formal and consequently awkward. For example, full name ...


4

It is mostly for jobs that require wearing a uniform. The uniform provides a visual cue for children that these are special people who may be able to help them when needed. Note that 司机叔叔/司机阿姨 are for professional drivers, not any driver of a private car.


4

When addressing the listener's family, a prefix 令 (ling4, which has a meaning of good, lucky) can be used: 令尊, your father 令堂, your mother 令郎, your son 令嫒, your daughter 令兄, your elder brother 令弟, your younger brother 令姊, your elder sister 令妹, your younger sister Correspondingly, when addressing the speaker's own family, a prefix 家(jia1, which means home, ...


3

I think blue collar workers are more likely to be called 师傅 For example, Chef, taxi driver, auto mechanic.


3

Yes, 哥们 means "men" or "buddies" But you can still call a single person '你们哥们' (you men). Which refers him as "one of the men/ men like you". You are not technically addressing him, but addressing his group For example, saying to a person: "You men are useless" suggest "you being one of them is also useless" "你也是我的哥们儿了" means "you too are (one of) my ...


3

I read Hometown decade ago, 杨二嫂 is more like her name in this book. But usually, 嫂 means someone's 'sister-in-law' in Mandarin, and means she married someone's 2nd elder brother.


3

depends on the original texts, here’re some: in 瀛環志略 卷九 governor of state is “統領”, while president of the united states is “總統領“ (i suspected it’s the origin of “總統” in 合省國說,the president is just “統領” in 遐邇貫珍,governor of state is “總憲”, while president of the united states is “合郡國主“ in 海國圖說 卷五十九: governor of state is “首領”, while president of the united ...


2

You would shout: 喂!喂!先生! 你掉了钱包! (Wèi! Wèi! Xiānshēng! Nǐ diào le qiánbāo!) Hey! Hey! Sir! You dropped your wallet! 喂 is important to attract attention. Note: Never use 小姐 (xiǎo jiě) to address a mainland Chinese woman. This has developed into a derogatory slang term meaning "slut" in mainland China (referring to those who work in hostess bars). It's ...


2

As fluffy's answer has noted, 小姐 may now cause confusion because of its other meaning - a prostitute. So you may want to avoid that unless used as an honorific e.g. 董小姐. According to my knowledge, in the north (of mainland China), they are usually called 服务员(server), both male and female. But in the south, they are usually called 帅哥(handsome man) for waiter ...


2

It is offensive to call any woman “shiao jie”(or in Pinyin, xiao jie) these days. Since maybe ten years ago "shiao jie" has carried the implication of being a prostitute(before that "shiao jie" is equivalent to Miss). And "da ge", "shiao ge", "da di", "shao di" are not proper addresses. "Da ge" is usually related to gangs in cities, and in rural areas it can ...


2

"小姐" is not such a dangerous work, haha. Just try to avoid using it in places like clubs,hotel etc. Because "小姐" will arouse bad associations in such places. By the way, “美女” is becoming more popular.


2

Edit: this post assumes you are using these words when addressing women in person. If you are simply talking about women rather than to them, then 女生,女孩,姑娘 etc are what you want, 女生 being the safest. 小姐 is neutral when it follows a person's surname and means "Miss ___." Otherwise, addressing someone as 小姐 would typically only occur in formal situations when ...


2

Before the '90s, 同志 (comrade) was a popular term that was fine to call others, both man and woman. But after Hong Kongers started to use it for another meaning (gay/lesbian), we stopped using it most of the time. Now we can use 先生 (sir), 小伙子 (young fellow), 帅哥 (handsome man), 朋友 (mate), 小姐 (miss), 美女 (beauty).


2

Here's an explanation: In the case of people with good moral standing and high reputation (德高望重), you can add 老 after their surname, this is a very respectful (很恭敬的) address. Screenshot from a book on Google Books. The relevant, very short sentence touching your question is highlighted (sorry, not very professional, but legible). Here's another source ...


2

For one character given name, I won't write only his/her given name in a letter in Chinese unless we are in a relationship. But in English, that is very normal. Also I have several very close friends whose given names are one character. But I won't call them given name in Chinese. On the contrary, if I mention him/her in English, I will use his/her given ...


2

I had answered what is 干父母 here: How to translate "干妈","干爸/义父","干儿子/义子“? The concept of 乾媽 and 乾爹 in Chinese culture is almost the same as " godmother and godfather in Western countries Since there are no equivalent terms of 干父母 in English, 'Godfather' and 'Godmother' would have to do. As for '义父母', it is just another name for '...


1

As a Chinese, I would like to say 干爹=Godfather and it's not 100% that chosen by the parents. For example, there's an old man who treats me very good and I asked him to be my godfather. 义父 means adoptive father but he' is not step father.


1

X老 is used to show respect to old person who usually has a high social/academic status. 老X is used like Mr.X as a prefix to given name, which shows closeness in an informal condition.


1

I think good old 你好 makes a very nice general-purpose way to get people's attention. It's not super-polite but it's not impolite either, and you can generally say it to any stranger to get their attention. I'm pretty sure it's ideal for the situation you describe, especially as you don't really have to think about it before blurting it out.


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