17

Q is Chinese slang for "chewy", similar to al dente in texture. You can see it in example phrases such as "Q感十足" (very chewy). You would expect foods such as tapioca pearls, gelatinous candies, pasta, or rice to be described as "Q". From my experience, this term is more popular in Taiwan and Hong Kong and less so in the mainland. I have not seen this term ...


16

Let me answer the most general question first: "even if the different languages are not mutually understandable when spoken, they are when written." To a large extent, this is true - but for two different reasons. Before the modern era, this is true because "written Chinese" was based on classical Chinese; whereas the spoken languages were highly divergent ...


14

From Wikipedia: There is no universally accepted criterion for distinguishing a language from a dialect. My hunch is that in general Chinese politics favors unity, whereas European politics favors separation, thus speakers of Dutch and German would hate to think that they were speaking dialects of the same language. Conversely in general it is useful ...


11

There is an American guy (I think) who teaches people how to speak Taiwanese on Youtube. He even teaches the native Taiwanese people how to speak 闽南语. You can see the videos here. EDIT: Looks like the playlist is dead. This is the guy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJo2OHi6hgs


11

In this case, I think the quote "A language is a dialect with an army and navy" best describes the situation. Since the mainland government considers linguistic unity to be in favor of their ruling, they will consider any spoken variety of Chinese to be a dialect, no matter how different it is from Mandarin (excluding minority languages).


11

哩勒公蝦毀 This sentence refers to the pronunciation of "What did you say?" in Min-Nan 哩(ㄌㄧ): You 勒(ㄌㄟ): an auxiliary verb 公(ㄍㄨㄥ): say 蝦毀(ㄒㄧㄚ ㄏㄨㄟˇ): what 蛤?! This word equals to "Huh? Could you speak up?". Taiwanese use this word commonly on the Internet because it's the first word choice in Bopomofo input method of "ㄏㄚˊ"


10

Although I don't speak Hakka (one of my PhD advisors studied a Hong Kong Hakka dialect, so I have a vague idea about it) I live surrounded by Hakka people, in Guangdong, and I go frequently to Taiwan for work. In Taiwan, I noticed that the HSR announcements in Hakka sounded very different from the "regular" Hakka I can hear in Guangdong. There's a bunch of ...


10

If you're only going one week, just learn some Mandarin. The advantages of learning Mandarin is that there are a lot of free resources, cheap and useful phrase books, and most people you will run into will understand Mandarin. I've been studying Minnanhua (spoken in Fujian and pretty much mutually intelligible with Taiwanese) for about a year and I ...


10

Q is Hokkien. The character is「食邱」and pronounced ㄎㄧㄨ (kiu, same as "Q"). The Chinese definition is 軟靭 ruǎn rèn (soft and tough) and means the texture of food being chewy. See the post "Q(k‘iu⊦)──軟靭" on the "taiwanlanguage" blog.


10

It is probably not the languages/dialects that don't have a corresponding Chinese character, but rather regional slang. The A菜 you see is actually 萵仔菜, or ue-á-tshài in Hokkien. That became became e-á-tshài which led it to be transcribed back into Chinese as A仔菜 and eventually A菜. There is actually a word for Q, but I am not aware of how to type that out on ...


9

Go to the most reliable source -- order the Maryknoll Fathers' set of 3 textbooks with CDs. While it is not exactly comprehensible input in its best form (it's predictible, since it's a book and the order doesn't change), it is the best set of materials currently available, and certainly the most comprehensive. If you have the patience to work through all ...


9

From the video: 想起走過的路 阮的腳步 雖然經過風雨 不怕寂寞 因為放在心中 是你的笑容 陪阮面對困難和艱苦 交給時間替阮來安排 唱出深深的愛 感謝你 惦在這舞台 不管起起落落 你的情 阮攏知 有時陣難免心頭酸 受著命運來阻礙 但是阮瞭解 是溫暖的期待 感謝你 惦在這舞台 對阮真心疼痛 陪伴一生的愛 相信一定會有一天 一切傷悲都成空 你敢知 感謝你深深的愛 (repeat) 千言萬語 一句話來表明 有你的鼓勵關懷 阮會認真為將來 感謝你 惦在這舞台 對阮真心疼痛 陪伴一生的愛 相信一定會有一天 一切傷悲都成空 你敢知 ...


8

There are many different dialects in China, for many special words in dialects, the "correct" character may not be found (the character has been abandoned in Mandarin), or may be a character but with a different pronunciation from Mandarin, or even can't be found. In fact, the average Chinese person can't tell you what the "correct" character in the dialect ...


8

In MOST cases... Outside of Beijing, in texts, I believe the 儿 is still pronounced. But you can be sure that in spoken Chinese, it will never be pronounced (unless some kids are trying to mock the access by over accentuating it). I said in MOST cases because there are some words that have simply been adopted by non-Beijing'ers and will always be pronounced ...


8

Their meanings are somewhat different. In a few situations, they are interchangeable, but there are many others where you can only use one and not the other. The key difference is that 呗 is much more assertive, even rhetorical, whereas 吧 can be used to express doubt or uncertainty as well. For completeness I'll cover them all. Definitions taken from zdic....


8

Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. Cantonese does have a phenomenon of lexical derivation which involves a change of tone, known as 變音 or changed tone; many discussions consider both these tone ...


8

拔(pronunciation only. Not sure how to write.)。 e.g. 面条放冷水里拔一下 焯是过热水。


7

As a form of Southwestern Mandarin, you can approach the Chongqing dialect with resources designed for Sichuanese in general. The English Wikipedia gives a lot of resources on "Si4cuan1hua4", including a good overview of the phonology, and a introduction to Sichuanese Pinyin. The Chinese Wikipedia gives a little more detail on the Chengdu-Chongqing dialect. ...


7

This is a Taiwanese (Min-nan) utterance. pronunciation: “哩(li) 勒(le) 公(gong) 蝦毀(siann-hue)?” translation word by word: You are saying what-thing? There is a hot Disney movie song FROZEN - Let It Go. Recently, we have a Taiwanese version of it http://youtu.be/23F1iAq__P8 at time slot during 1:18~1:21 There is a similar sentence (only the ...


7

Before getting into you assumptions I think it's best if we take a look at a post on Language Log from Victor Mair, a name students of Chinese are probably quite familiar with: Cantonese Novels by Victor Mair In my estimation, there is far too little genuine topolectal literature in China. Throughout history, nearly everything has been written ...


7

It is a foul character, usually pronounced as "cat6". The original character is "𡴶", which means "scrotum". On the contrary, in modern slang uses, it refers to the penis in a flaccid state, and commonly written as "𨳍" or "柒". The implied meaning is thus "useless", "stupid", etc. Many people tweak the pronounciation from "cat6" to "cat1" (hence, "七"/"柒")...


7

From 汉语大词典 呗 II bei ˙ㄅㄟ 1. 助词。表示事实或道理明显,易于了解。 ▶ 何永鳌《火焰山上四十天》:「有什么奇怪的,一块红石头呗。」 2. 助词。表示勉强同意或无所谓的语气。 ▶ 周立波《暴风骤雨》第一部一:「他想,不明白就不明白吧,反正他们会给他车钱,这就得了呗。」 ▶ 草明《乘风破浪》第四章:「他闷闷不乐,低着头说:‘挺好呗。’」 So, the 呗 in your first example is the first meaning above. But I think in the second one, 呗 may mean 吧. 你帮我把这个整完吧。


6

龌龊 wò chuò Meanings: (1) dirty;filthy (2) mean,despicable It's not Shanghai dialect only. It's used a lot in northern China as well.


6

I agree with your friend. I think the correct version is "什么来着". You can find the word"来着",but you can't find the word"来的“ in the dictionary. I think it's popular in northern area(such as 北京,天津,河北,辽宁). I have heard of "什么来着" on the TV and I can understand it, though I have never used "什么来着", either in mandarin or in my dialect. (Not applicable) Of course the ...


6

I agree with others who say you should work with a native speaker to help you with pronunciation. However, having a grammar book will be immensely helpful as well, since many native speakers are often unaware of their own language's grammar (many will often say "that's just how you say it" without knowing why; I've also heard native speakers assert that ...


6

Your pronunciation is correct. This is a common mis-pronunciation in many places in China, not just Shanxi. In fact, this is so common that nearly every modern Chinese input software supports so called "模糊音"(ambiguous pronunciation). The user can config if this function is enabled. Here's a screenshot of the config in Google Pinyin software: As you can ...


6

Yes there are. Such language in Chinese is referred to as 回回话 Huíhui huà. Thanks to user xiaohouzi79 for pointing out the book Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic By Dru C. Gladney, which is partly viewable on Google Books. This book contains a large appendix, A Select Glossary of Hui Chinese Islamic Terms on pages 393 to 421. Here ...


6

"師奶(师奶)" refer to a married woman, and is popular used in Southern China. Is is rarely used in Mandarin. 師奶(「奶」字要讀高N音,同「拉」嘅音調一樣),太太嘅俗稱。主要係街坊之間用嚟打招呼嘅用詞。哩個詞語亦都可以用嚟取笑嗰啲唔多化粧,外表睇起上嚟土土地好似傳統家庭主婦咁嘅未婚女士,有所謂「師奶仔」嘅叫法。1 translate to Simplified Chinese "师奶(‘奶’字要读高N音,和‘拉’到音调一样),太太的俗称。主要是街坊邻居用来打招呼的词。也可以用来嘲笑不修边幅,看起来向像家庭主妇的未婚女士,这些未婚女士也会被叫做‘师奶仔’。" translate to English "...


6

Well apparently I got the characters wrong as it should be “跟倒”... It is not part of MSM. It's from 四川话 Documentation: from "四川方言词典": from "成都方言词典":


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