7

maybe "大中華區". most multinational corporations used this term to describe the regions you mentioned. such usage is correct, in context of nowadays, or recent decades. historically, taiwan was integrated into the chinese empire after ~1683. before that time, formosa was colonised by the dutch, spanish. history of taiwan last, and most importantly is: how ...


4

Wikipedia has the following pages: Sichuanese characters & 四川方言字 Written Cantonese & Cantonese characters Written Hokkien & 台閩漢字 Wu characters Here you can find characters that solely belong to topolects. There is also an introduction to topolectical characters: 方言字 Many topolectical characters are also still being prepped for Unicode ...


3

It's not a standard term, but it's understandable. I don't know if it's a dialect. It's not common in any areas I have lived in. I'd understand it as its literal meaning: 别: other 间 is a measure word for room (房间). You can compare its usage to 这间, so as a demonstrative. E.g. 这间酒店. I suppose you could say 别间酒店. Basically, it should have something to do ...


3

Your 1st interpretation is correct. In a three-character word the middle character tends to be ommitted. 驾驶证 jia shi zheng -> 驾驶证儿 jia shi zh-r -> 驾儿证儿 jia r zh-r -> 驾(儿)证儿 jia-r zh-r -> 酱汁儿 jiang zh-r This is the same for 派出所 becoming 派儿所 (盼儿锁 in the article).


3

First off: this is a Sichuanese song. Let's start with something you'll recognize: Q: 怎么办? A: 凉拌! In Sichuanese this is called: 展嘴巴劲 or 扳嘴巴劲 or 展牙巴劲. That is relevant because this is a form of Sichuanese 展嘴巴劲. It goes a little something like this: A: 有事 B: 和尚赶道士 It is something that is said when someone thinks that you are coming up with a ...


2

把 is a cultural usage in China, it suggests that the phone feels light when you take/carry it. But I don't recommend using it, because we usually describe small objects as "一把 small objects", more like "a handful of small objects". For example: 一把小挂件 = a handful of small pendants.


2

Probably because HK was a British colony. I did notice that HK Cantonese sounds differently compared to Cantonese in Guangdong, China. Personally I only feel it's softer but I don't know if it is related to the fact HongKonger was influenced by British English accent. Maybe you can do more research and provide clearer examples in your questions.


2

The article is exaggerating the sound change for humorous effect. 驾驶 would easily get elided into something like jiàr in fast speech, but it would never become nasalized to jiàng. 证 would indeed become zhèngr (which is pronounced like a nasalized zhèr) due to 儿化音, but it would never undergo the tone and vowel change to become zhīr.


2

It seems to be 东北方言 (northeast dialect) 跳马猴子 - 顽皮淘气的孩子,多指男孩 and '跳马猴子'指不老实的人,特别是小孩儿。如'你一天跳马猴子似的疯跑, 也不知道写作业'。 It's usually used for naughty and active boys.


2

People say calling a woman 小姐 in Hong Kong and Taiwan is ok. but not so good in Mainland China. I have to disagree with this presumption. It all depend on the context and the situation this term is used. Generally 小姐 is a polite/ formal address for single woman in Chinese everywhere. For example: 張小姐 (Miss Zhang) 我家小姐 (my daughter/ the daughter in the ...


2

It's the IPA diacritic for the nasal release from a stopped consonant: Quoting right from that Wikipedia page: That is, the /d/ is released directly into the /n/: [ˈsʌdⁿn̩]. Where [ˈsʌdⁿn̩] is the IPA transcription of the English word "sudden", where the blocked air flow from the articulation of /d/ is released through the nose (you should feel ...


2

賊: 方言。很,十分。表示程度相当高。多用于贬义。" The meaning of 賊 as an adverb for "very" is marked as 'dialect' (方言) Speaking of dialect, Cantonese speakers in Hong Kong use the terms 好鬼/ 鬼咁/ 鬼死咁 to a similar effect Example: 好鬼靚, 鬼咁靚 and 鬼死咁靚 all mean 'extremely/ very pretty' We can replace all three with 賊 and say 賊漂亮 in this Mandarin dialect and the meaning ...


2

Short answer: Just for the convenience of writing, it has nothing relationship with "Thief". Detailed explaination: Keep in mind: Some word in Chinese is just a pronounciation, it has no official word. So, in your case, how did 贼 come to mean: extremely: The answer is: for the convenience of writing. Originally, people would say this orally: ...


1

A simple explanation might be that the sound "zei" with 阳平 tone (second tone) in 东北话 can be represented in Standard Written Chinese only with this character 贼 (...and 鲗 cuttlefish?). No, I don't think that is the correct explanation. I was born in the northeast of China, and later moved to other regions (now in Shanghai). I don't know the ...


1

According to this map there are some Chinese languages in which the trill r is present.


1

The Austronesian hypothesis for the origin of Min Nan bah (as quoted on English Wiktionary, as of June 2020), comes from Deng Xiaohua's 1994 paper 〈南方漢語中的古南島語成分〉 ("Proto-Austronesian in Southern Chinese Languages"). I have attached an image here from a secondary source: I see that the 16/17th century (Zhangzhou / Philippine) Hokkien-Spanish ...


1

I am not sure if this is what you were looking for, but there is a book that does this kind of study 中国语言地图集. You can refer to 知乎 for some examples.


1

I'm not sure 北方话 here means mandarin (官话) languages or the Chinese languages in northern China. If the former, most 桂柳官话, i.e. southwestern mandarins in Guangxi, meet your requirements. If the latter, some dialects in Shandong preserve the pronunciation somehow between palatal and velar. A CCP political figure 孙政才, who is from 山东荣成, speaks with an accent ...


1

This is a typical example of slurred speech in colloquial Chinese. Just like we say "I'm" instead of "I am", "kill'em" instead of "kill them"; "kinda" instead of "kind of", "gonna" instead of "going to" in English. While we usually represent these verbal shorthand by way of ...


1

I've heard that sh, ch, and zh, all turn to r in beijinghua This is just an effect of speaking fast. The groups zh, ch and sh in Beijing dialect, which Mandarin is based upon, are retroflex consonants. The English r instead is a postalveolar consonant, and it's an approximant (meaning that your tongue doesn't hinder the air flow from your lungs). If we look ...


1

I don't suggest you summarise such rules. As a language learner, one of your goals is saying words clearly and accurately. In this way, receivers would completely understand it the first time you say sentences. Similar to New York and London, there are more outsiders living in Beijing than native speakers of Beijing dialect. Thus, Beijing dialect speakers ...


1

I can think of a few ways for this to work, each could have varying degrees of difficulty in implementation. Word Choice As @Marko mentioned in comments, Cantonese usually has a very different choice of word for common expressions. For example: 點(trad.)/点(simp.) in Cantonese vs. 怎 in Mandarin 邊/边 vs. 哪 係/系 vs. 是 唔 vs. 不 嘅 vs. 的 喺 vs. 在 咁 vs. 这么 sentence-...


1

孃 usually is used by people who live in southwest China, to refer women who are in the middle age. People in southwest China use it to call their older female relatives, or female strangers who seemed like in the middle age. 娘 means mom, but it usually used by people who live in North China. In South China, people call their mom as 妈妈 I'm a Chinese, and ...


1

In my opinion, the issue is less regional, but more subjective. One might take it offensive in the situation where another doesn't care. So, I really doubt you would be able to find such a map. The easy way to get around this is to avoid using it unless you are sure they don't care. Like when you try to call the attention of someone, you can say 你好,饭馆在哪儿?, ...


1

Probably depends on the locations and needs. People who speak dialects probably can understand at least either Mandarin or Cantonese. That can be the reaons why Mandarin and/or Cantonese is the requirement in general.


1

NO, there is no one single term that would satisfy everyone. Just take another country we all know, which is called:- England, Great Britain, British Isles, United Kingdom......


1

中國大陸和台灣 / mainland China and Taiwan Obviously Taiwan is not located inside mainland, so restricting China to mainland China may meet your purpose


1

Not only in Sichuan. Some Anhui dialects use it too. Probably contracted from 何麽. 哪麽 contracted to be LANG in Chongqing.


1

This is a more political questions than linguistics questions. "Standard written language" means regulated by government and used in public places so that every educated individual can understand regardless region. However, Cantonese by linguistics standard, can be considered as a complete different language from Mandarin, so does Shanghainese. The ...


1

Some times my dad would say so and I thought it was created by him. 拜了个拜 means byebye but more informalitly and smart. (I actually thought only my family would say this word)


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