New answers tagged

0

With regards to the word 方言 popularly taken to mean "a dialect", a definition of the word "dialect" is necessary. A dialect is defined as "A particular form of a language which is peculiar to a specific region or social group" So, it is a "form of a language", meaning it has a "mother language" and it takes ...


1

I believe all countries have dialects. Where a dialect stops and a language begins is unclear. I would say the Central Government of a nation will concern itself with the national language, because it directly binds the people of a nation together. Thus the notion: "A language is a dialect with an army and a navy." vernacular: 白话,通俗用语,日常用语,本地话,本国语,...


3

According to ISO 639, Cantonese, Mandarin, Wu, etc. are languages, and Chinese is a macrolanguage. It is easy and somehow correct to translate dialect <-> 方言, but it is not precisely accurate. As far as Chinese is concerned, those called 方言 today once were languages and sounds like languages more than like dialects. But they share the same writing ...


-3

I consider dialect is localized differences in speaking and pronunciation within a country. While American English differs from British English, it should be considered as the former was a branch of the latter, as both are under the same root, but differences developed due to the separation of social-political systems, therefore a regional differences rather ...


3

Chinese do not consider American English a dialect American English = 美式英語 (American style English) or 美國英語 British English = 正宗英語 (Authentic English), 英式英語 (British style English) or 英國英語 Both are English. We Canadian consider our English North American (北美洲) English - the same as 美國英語 American accent = 美國口音 British accent = 英國口音 The difference between ...


1

北京話 basically has a lot of 兒化音, once in a few words they will 兒化 it. Even as a native Chinese speaker, I'm not quite used to it lol


0

Not 100% what you're looking for, but there's a twitter bot called 北京话bot that tweets lots of (what seem to me to be) Beijing colloquialisms. https://twitter.com/BeijingHua It gives some explanations of the terms it mentions, in 普通话. Not really a reference but it is quite interesting I think.


1

AFAIK, a nasal onset consonant and a nasal coda can't appear in the same syllable in Taiwanese (Hokkien)(eg. Bân-lâm instead of Mân-nâm), so mián is illegal to be formed.


0

There are some old multisyllabic morphemes already present in Middle Chinese, including 蝴蝶 and 玻璃.


2

郭 (Kwok, also spelled Kuok) is a Cantonese surname. It is cognate with the Mandarin surname 郭 (Guo, Kuo).


Top 50 recent answers are included