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I'd like to say something different. 炸醬麵 is the only correct word. We need to clarify why Zhajiangmian is called so. Zhajiangmian originated from Shandong Province, and the core of it is the sauce, Zhajiang. Usually, Zhajiang is cooked with minced pork and soybean paste stirred in large quantity of oil, which looks like deep-frying the sauce in the wok, thus ...


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in the book 類篇 卷二十二 (page 87 of the liked pdf), there was an entry: 伲儞你乃倚切汝也或作儞你你又乃里切文三重音一 that, 伲 儞 你 ・[these three characters are pronounced as] 乃倚切・[have the meaning of] 汝 (you) the book “類篇” is edited between 1039-1066, in 宋 dynasty. i would say that 儞 / 你 existed in the past, just not commonly used as 汝 have fun :)


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儞 古同“你” 「你 」的異體字 儞 is an archaic classical term that had been replaced by 你 in traditional character. ("long before simplified Chinese" was introduced." as one of your reference stated). In other words, when they started simplifying traditional characters, the character 儞 did not exist in modern Chinese. It had been simplified to 你, and the ...


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Check wiki, basicly 覆盆子(Rubus idaeus) is one kind of 树莓(Raspberry), 树莓(Raspberry) also include 山莓 (Rubus corchorifolius), 牛叠肚 (Rubus crataegifolius) etc. 树莓英文为“Raspberry”也可以指覆盆子(Rubus idaeus)但是它只是其中一种,广义来讲还可指悬钩子属内的部分物种。


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Someone just up voted this and got me looking back at solutions. 𫪁 does exist now. There is an entry on zisea mention that it is part of: cjk ext. e It was part of Unicode 8.0 and released on June 17, 2015.


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People outside Chinese region may think any type of character form change in Mainland China are "simplifications", which is not true. The example in your question is actually glyph differences, which are called "New Character Forms" or "Xin Zixing". It regulates the orthodox form of parts of glyphs, while "simplification&...


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It is very clear if you search 醡醬麵 on google. All the results are about 炸酱面. I would simply say 醡醬麵 does not exist, it is a typo. As is stated by other answers, 炸酱面 might be only known to the north, so if a southerner sees the word he might misunderstand it and miss-"spell" it. I would be convinced if such a dish exists using the technique of 榨 to ...


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