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12

I'm afraid that you are reading much too into this. There is no "meaning behind each stroke". 「信」(Baxter-Sagart OC: /*s-ni[ŋ]-s/, sincerity) is composed of semantic「言」(speech, here vaguely hinting at honest words) and phonetic「人・亻」(/*ni[ŋ]/).


6

I would say : “比y的两倍小14”.


6

The character in question is: 信. This might not be the answer that you want, but this is how Outlier explains the character: FORM 信 xìn contains the meaning component 言 “speech; words,” indicating the original meaning, “sincerity; honesty.” 亻 rén gives the sound. COMPONENTS 亻 In 信 xìn, 亻 rén is a sound component, though this is not obvious in ...


4

They are the words 無政府. 無 means "without" or "absent of", while 政府 means "government". So literally, 無政府 means "without government". Note that this does not necessarily carry as strong of a connotation as "anarchy", although that is indeed often translated as 無政府狀態 (literally: "state of no government").


4

How about: 跟着导航走 Short, concise and simple. 跟着 = follow 导航 = gps 走 = go You could even tell a lost taxi driver the same phrase to let them know to follow the gps.


4

It is (at least) a full quarter of an hour. Note that 足足 is used for emphasizing that. ◎ 足足 zúzú [full;solid] 不少于


3

足足有一刻钟 here means "a full quarter of an hour". 足足 means fully. The word is usually emotional, implying that that amount is a big deal. E.g. 我在这里足足等了你两个小时. (implying: two hours is really long time. It's a complaining about the fact that you kept me waiting for that long.) PS. Compare 足足有两小时 and 足有两个小时. They mean the same(a full two hours), but the former ...


2

信 http://www.shuowen.org/view/1519 信 http://www.cantonese.sheik.co.uk/dictionary/characters/669/ 《說文解字注》誠也。 信 originally meant "honest; sincere" 从人言 made up of 人(people) and 言 (words) ~ Extended meanings 信 contains: 信(honest; sincere) --> 信(trust) --> 信(believe) 信(trust) --> 信(faithful) 信(sincere) --> 信(letter) Compound words ...


2

"难得到" is short for "难以得到" (hard to get). It is not a standard phrase (連)*你的健康都难得到保证,(就)*更别说幸福了 There is a common grammar structure here: [連 (X) 都 (+ statement) , 更别说 (Y)了] [even (X) (+ statement) , let alone/ not to mention (Y)] [even (your health) (cannot be guaranteed/ ensured), let alone/ not to mention (your happiness)] If your ...


2

It means a full quarter of an hour. Besides that, 足足 also have a meaning to describe the duration of the time is very long for the person at speaking. It's like an emphasize. In this sentence, it means the 15 minutes is pretty long for the person who writes this sentence.


1

The first image says "公平,公正,公开" on the hoodie, firstly notice the bit of Japanese at the bottom. Chances are that isn't meant to be read in Chinese. Either way, the main three terms translate roughly as "impartial", "equitable", and "public" respectively. I guess the hoodie has something to do with freedom of speech or something similar. The other central ...


1

If you give more context, you will get a better translation. 当你生病了, When you are sick, 如果由于缺钱而不能及时去看医生, and you can't go to see a doctor, because you don't have any money, 你的健康都难得到保证, even your health can't be guaranteed, 就更别说幸福了。 never mind talking about happiness. 健康都难得到保证 health even difficult get guarantee Is 难得到 a set phrase? No. 保证 a guarantee


1

如果 由于 缺钱 而 不能 及时 去 看医生[看病] If you cannot visit a doctor due to lacking of money 你的 健康 都 难[以] 得到 保证 Your healthy is difficult to be guaranteed. (You cannot guarantee your healthy) 难以: difficult to 得到保证:be guaranteed 更别说 幸福 了 let along happinese 更别说:let alone ..., literally "don't even mention"


1

Here, "就更别说" means "let alone". "难得到" is not a set phrase. It seems to me that "得到保证" is. "保证" is still a noun in this sentence (I confirm this with my mom, a high school Chinese teacher in China).


1

大巧不工 is from 《重剑无锋,大巧不工》 重 heavy 剑 sword 无 no 锋 sharp edge 大 big 巧 delicate 不 no 工 work 《重剑无锋,大巧不工》 Epee with no sharp edge, delicate work The true power is not from the weapon, is from the one who uses it. What is the sword style here called? Sword style means the the moves of the swordsman Whats the translation of this passage??? 大巧不工剑 is the ...


1

你刚刚到了纳尼亚。 How on earth did you find this place? 你到底是怎么找到这个地方的? I just followed the instructions from my Lucy. 我只是按照我的露茜指令。


1

按导航开; 按照导航来; Even 听导航的; Those are colloquial phrases. In formal writing, it could be: 按照GPS导航所指引的路线来行驶.


1

In this context: Follow = 依照 (you are not obeying orders, you are listening to instructions and following them as stated) GPS' = 卫星导航的 guidelines = 指引 (pointing and leading to a specific route) or instructions = 指示 (pointing and showing a specific route) Following the GPS' guidelines/ instructions 依照 卫星导航的 指示 指示 is the better choice because ...


1

Can I have the full paragraph? If not here's the translation 跨境領導任務的人選


1

This is the same as 弹琴敬酒 为你祝寿, which means something like "playing the qin and drinking wine, to celebrate a loyal friend's birthday". Note that playing the qin is considered a very high-class and cultured activity in ancient China, as well as being one of the four main skills any learned person must acquire---“琴棋书画”, i.e. playing the qin, playing qi (...


1

In Chinese, it means "no government"


1

"从此我一听到“拔”那个字就记起你" "from now on" is translated as "從今以後", not just "从此" (since this moment/ since that moment) "记起" means "remember", you should use "会想起" (will think of) instead ~ 在牙医时 "牙医" means "dentist", which is a person, you should either write "在牙医診所时" (when you were at the dentist's office) or "去看牙医时" (when you went to see the ...


1

To understand Chinese, sometimes you need to think deeper. Your understanding is right, "刀" means knife, "眼" means eye. "不长" means without, while "不" means no or dont and "长" means have in this sentence. So, put them together, the sentence means the knife doesn't have eyes. Think deeper, what happens if some thing doesn't have eyes and move fast? It may hurt ...


1

The full sentence goes like this:"去到长安,东北转角,逢着天门,便有下落", comes from Zhuge Shenshu Verse No.355. If you feel it doesn't make sense, then you get the point. This book was used to do Fortune-telling, so it meant to confuse the readers, so the Fortune-tellers can pick up from here, use their knowledge (verbal tricks) to explain your destiny. A word to word ...


1

The comment by drooze above is spot-on. The phrase "everything happens for a reason" suggests a "good" reason. This idea has a long history in the West but is best encapsulated in Leibniz's idea that we live in the best of all possible worlds--God could not have made it better and has a good plan behind every seemingly bad event. Voltaire has this play ...


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