34

the "俄" part seems to have no corresponding phoneme, either in Russian or any of the other language I have looked up. Yes it's peculiar in Chinese. It's related to the Mongolian. Reference: 郭文深.俄罗斯国家名称变迁考——从“罗刹”到“俄罗斯” Summarize it in short: From Yuan Dynasty, the Mongolian translated 罗斯 as oros (but not ros) followed by the Mongolian pronunciation habit, ...


26

In traditional Chinese, 乾 means "dry", 幹 means "to do", and has the slang meaning of "f**k". Both words are simplified to 干.


18

「在」in「你在笑什麽」is not equivalent to English at in what are you laughing at?. To demonstrate by analogy: 你在吃什麽 - what are you eating? 你在做什麽 - what are you doing? 「在」is actually equivalent to the suffix -ing in laughing, eating, doing. It is English which grammatically requires something as a target for the verb laughing; this requirement is redundant in ...


16

Voicing and Aspiration Stop consonants can fall into the following categories (roughly): Voiced stops: Vocal chords start vibrating before stop is released. E.g., English "b" as in "bat" (/bæt/ in IPA), French "b" as in "bon" = /bɔ̃/. Unvoiced unaspirated stops: Vocal chords start vibrating almost exactly when stop is released. E.g., Chinese "b" as in "bu" ...


15

This is actually a common problem in newspapers and television in Singapore, where the original report may have been filed by a reporter who did not or cannot use Chinese. In these cases, the author simply chooses phonetically matching characters to fill in the name of the person, then add (音) or (译音) to indicate that the name shown is only a phonetic ...


15

First, as fefe said, this idiom should be “民以食为(wéi)天" and it comes from 《汉书·郦食其传》“王者以民为天,而民以食为天。” (biography of 郦食其 in the historical record of 汉 dynasty). That sentence means "People are the most important to an emperor, while foods are the most important to the people". Note that the correct pronunciation of the name is: lì yī jī Why? Remember in ancient ...


15

This idiom comes from the famous book of 《论语》, a book recording the Confucius and his disciples' words. Here is the source: 《论语·卫灵公》:“子曰:‘当仁,不让于师’。” Explanations: 卫灵公 is the name of a chapter of that book. In that chapter, you can read this sentence(the 36th) "子曰:‘当仁,不让于师’。“ The Confucius said:" when [you are] facing 仁(see note), you should not ...


15

The most appropriate translation to make sense would probably be 有道理, which literally means has sense or reason. For example: 你说的有道理 What you said is reasonable / What you said makes sense. The phrase 说不通 would probably work, but it is not used frequently in Mainland China Mandrian(普通话) as 有道理 for the same context, if at all. As for 符合逻辑, the phrase ...


15

The characters read: 忠于毛主席 Zhōng yú Máo zhǔxí 忠 means faithful; 于 is a multi-use preposition which, to me, sounds a bit archaic/formal, and here means "to", but can also mean "in" or "on"; 毛 is Mao Zedong's surname; 主席 means "chairman". So this translates to "Faithful to Chairman Mao". By the way, if you give the correct characters to Google, the ...


14

谁让 expresses weak causality with a mood. Depending on the context and the tone, the mood can be humor, banter, sarcastic, helplessness, complaining or something else. Accordingly the translation can be "since", "after all", "only because", "God knows why", etc. In your example, it seems the speaker is just grumbling or expressing helplessness in a cool mood....


14

The meaning is: 我爱你.I love you. 爱(ài, love) sounds like the English "I"; 老虎(lǎohǔ, tiger) sounds like "love"; 油(yoú, oil) sounds like "you". It originally comes from the movie 狮王争霸. In the movie 十三姨 teaches 黄飞鸿 (played by 李连杰 (Jet Li)) how to say I love you. 黄飞鸿 pronounces it as 爱老虎油. Afterwards 黄飞鸿's father overhears it and asks what it means. 黄飞鸿 says it ...


14

Basically they have the same meanings. Now let's focus on the difference, but first wrap your head in duct tapes in case it explodes. 往往 is usually used with conditions supplied. Without any condition it is usually wrong: 我常常加班。 -- Good. 我往往加班。 -- Wrong. 北京常常下雪。-- Good. 北京往往下雪。 -- Wrong. 北京往往在冬天下雪。-- Good. Notice the constraint. ...


14

I think your Chinese counterpart got confused because you mentioned the importance of drinking tea as part of your lifestyle, yet refusing the tea she offered. Your subsequent clarification on your preference to drink mediocre coffee rather than mediocre tea helps clear the air. You could have expressed it unambiguously in this manner: 我对喝茶比较讲究,咖啡就好。 I ...


14

By now you have figured out, why the years are represented as YYY, but just to make this post not look like many of those stubs on this site, here's a more detailed answer to anyone stumbling upon this page in the future. Taiwan (officially styled the Republic of China) still uses the Republican calendar (or Minguo calendar), alongside the international ...


14

兄弟/姐妹 can be used to refer to a single sibling, especially when the ages are unknown. For example, His brother is playing basketball. can be translated into 他的一位兄弟在打篮球。


14

What does 你吃了吗?mean? 「你吃了嗎?」 此句的原義是確認“吃的行為”。譬如: 「吃藥時間過了。你吃了嗎?」 「這個蛋糕很好吃。你吃了嗎?」 "Have you eaten?" The original meaning of this sentence is to confirm the action of eating. For example, "The time to take medicine has passed. Have you taken it?" "This cake is very delicious. Did you eat it?" 不知道什麼時候開始,它變成「打招呼」用語。原因可能就像一般人推測的那樣:民以食為天。維持生命最重要的東西就是食物。 Nobody ...


13

“而已” is always used at the end of a sentence and with words like “仅仅”,"只","不过". A similar word in Chinese is "罢了"(actually, this word comes from 满语). You use the structure "......(part A),不过......(part B)而已" to emphasize the expression that A is just limited within B. You could only use "不过", also, and "而已“ weakens your mood and sometimes expresses that you ...


13

A reasonable translation of "你说的" is: "That which you spoke". 的 turns 你说 (a verbal phrase) into 你说的 (a noun). 你说是什么 doesn't make any sense grammatically - it means "You said is what?" You can say, "你说什么" - which is literally, "You said what?" or in proper English, "What did you say?" 你说的是什么, however, means "That which you said is what?" or properly, "What ...


13

Negative numbers are simply read 负xxx, for example: -5 负五 -1234.5 负一千二百三十四点五 (-3) x 5 = -15 负三乘以五等于负十五 2^(-3) 二的负三次方 When applied to certain domain, there might be domain specific way to read it. For example for temperature, it's more common to read it as 零下 (literally 'below zero'): -10°C 零下十(摄氏)度 Reading as 负十度 is also correct, just ...


13

Actually the literal translation of English sounds natural in this case: 你们有Wi-Fi和电源吗? or 你们有Wi-Fi和插座吗? Here 电源 means power source, and 插座 means electric socket.


13

I'm not sure where you could get an accurate count for how many there are. Considering that loanwords have been coming into Chinese for thousands of years, it definitely won't be a trivial task. There is certainly quite a few, however, not all of which is current/widespread/universal. I'll list some here, and edit more in if I think of any later: Angel: ...


13

It is more natural to say 还没有……到……地步 For example, 挺好的,但还没有好到那个地步。 Or it tastes fine, but I would not go so far as to say that it is delicious can be 味道还行,但还没有好吃到十分美味的地步 Well, if you were in a more oral conversation, you would normally say 但也没有很/特别…… 但也不是很/特别…… For example I went to the national park, which was a good trip, but I ...


12

The text is read from top to bottom, right to left. First two columns: 香遠溢清 Which means As the aroma (of the flower, referring in particular to the lotus) goes further, it becomes more and more pure and fresh. BTW, the artist mistakes 益(more and more) for 溢(overflow, spill). These two characters sound the same in Chinese. Maybe the artist was ...


12

This is a slang heavily used in online communities. I am not certain when it started. It means perfect logic, usually in a joking sense. Interestingly enough, it is also a sarcastic expression often used to accuse someone of his/her peculiar, erroneous logic. A common instance of each would be: Sarcasm A:「我开会没有迟到,老板应该要给我加薪。」 "I was not late for the ...


12

1. Kanji with Chinese character counterpart Wikipedia (ref 1) implies this is the majority case: Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation. When translating these names, the kanji characters are directly converted to their Chinese counterparts. It's not always 1:1 though, ...


12

“俄罗斯”不是从英文或俄文来的。可能是从蒙古文Oros来的。 在中国元明朝时称俄罗斯族为“罗斯”或“罗刹国”.当时蒙古族人用蒙语拼读俄文“ROCIA”时,在“R”前面加一个元音.因此,“ROCIA”就成了“OROCCIA”.满清政府时,蒙语的“OROCCIA”转译成汉语时,就成了“俄罗斯”. The name of "Éluósī" does not come from English or Russian. It may come from Mongolian Oros. During the Chinese Yuan and Ming dynasties the Russian ethnic group was called "Luósī" or "Luóchàguó". At that time as ...


11

In this context 讲 is short for 讲究 which means to pay particular attention to; to be particular about. So you can also say 讲究礼貌 and 讲究卫生.


11

Overall both translations are fine and fluent, with some small issues below: Grammatical/Syntactic issues: I think there is only one issue, in (2) 我们想酒保因为要省钱的. Either use 要省钱 as verb (i.e. remove 的), or use 要省钱的 as adjective (i.e. add 是 before 要). Semantic issues: In (1), margarita mix is translated into 玛格丽特混合物. In Chinese, people don't refer food/drink ...


11

In this case, miss equals to 想(念),思念 while think of equals to 想到,想起. So 'I miss you' is the right choice. 'I think of you' means '我想起了你'. But sometimes 'I am thinking of you' is translated into ‘我想着你’. When one say '我想你(+Adverbial)' or ‘我在想你(+Adverbial)’ as a sentence alone, it means that I miss you or I'm missing you. And when one say '我想你+...', it ...


11

有人 is someone, some people, anyone. 有人觉得我长得像


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