New answers tagged

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means being stunned, speechless or stupefied


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When we say someone deserves to get that job, it usually means that (based on certain facts) we believe that guy is at least qualified for the job, so I opt for "理应得到那份工作". But sometimes we would also say "值得" in a similar context, like "他值得加薪/表扬" (he deserves to be paid more / praised). The nuance is that in the latter case, it ...


1

I find 2 versions of translation for this quote on the Chinese Internet, both of them are widely used to teach children to be kind to animals. 1. 从一个人对待动物的态度中,我们可以略晓其善心 2. 我们通过一个人对待动物的态度来判断他的心地


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It is spoken: shì sǐ rú guī 把死看得好像回家一样。 Regard death like coming home. 形容为了正义的事业,不怕死。 (It) describes in the name of justice, no fear of death. 《吕氏春秋·勿躬》: Mr. Lü's Spring and Autumn, Wu Gong (@239BC) “三军之士,视死如归。” All soldiers, regard(视shì) death (死sǐ) as (如rú) returning (归guī) . 归:回家。 returning: returning home. What lamentable home lives they must have had!!


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This is a really good question. I assume you have already known that 了 is a sign of perfect aspect/tense. Although it is still controversial among grammarians whether Chinese languages have tenses or aspects, from a learner’s perspective, it is the easiest way to understand it. So what you are asking is, why there is another verb 来 in this sentence. 来 is a ...


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視死如歸 /shì sǐ rú guī/ 釋義: 把犧牲生命看成是回到自己的家一般, Meaning: Think of sacrificing life as returning to one's own home 視 = see 死 = death 如 = as 歸 = return; go back 視死如歸 = see death as going home (meaning 'not afraid of dying' - 不怕死) Simplified Chinese: 视死如归 Note: Use traditional characters if your audience is Taiwan or Hong Kong Chinese; use simplified Chinese if ...


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Much like English, A孕育B means 'A gives birth to B'. It can be used figuratively. 奔騰不息的黃河孕育了古老的華夏文明 It's common knowledge that civilisations formed on the banks of rivers. Rivers provide the water needed for agriculture. Therefore, they are prerequisites for the civilisations. Civilisations form because of their presence. So rivers "gave birth" to ...


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There is nothing wrong with using 孕育 as 'give birth to' in a metaphorical sense, 奔腾不息的黄河孕育了古老的华夏文明. A river metaphorically gives birth to civilization or a people. Without the Yellow River, the ancient Chinese civilization would not exist. Without the Singapore River, the Singaporean people would not be here


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deserve originally meant: “completely serve”, then became "be entitled to sth. because of good service" = "should get" which is more or less the modern meaning. 'should get' is what often comes out in Chinese and to my ears sufficiently carries the intended meaning. Personally, I think you may be reading too much into 'deserve'. In my ...


1

To me it's sound like past continuous tense. Without 来了: Her friend called her at the dinner. With 来了:The call came when she was having the dinner.


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Google Translate: John deserves to get that job -- 約翰配得上那份工作 Google suggests '配得上' for 'deserve to', I think it is quite close because it implies John has merit to receive this outcome. Other translations for deserve in a different context: 理應: should/ ought to (based on fairness/ reason) Example: "John deserves to get that job" - "...


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John deserves to get that job 约翰(该得)那份工作


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I don't think you should regard 来了 as necessarily belonging together. Nor does 了 always indicate the past. 她来了,绕过拐角过来了。 She's coming, (she's) just coming round the corner now. 公共汽车来了。 Here comes the bus. 她吃晚饭的时候她朋友打电话来了。 While she was eating supper her friend called. 她吃晚饭的时候她朋友打来电话了。 While she was eating supper her friend called. Languages tend to like ...


2

她朋友打电话来了. 来 here implies that her friend's call is towards her. 她朋友打电话了 just means her friend made a phone call, no direction indicated. Compare 我一会打电话过去 to 我一会打电话过来. Both 过去 and 过来 suggest the direction of the call. Btw, 了 just denotes the completion.


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Verbs in Chinese don't have past tenses. 她朋友打电话来了 -> Her friend called. Or she received a phone call from her friend.


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compare to the original text, it’s an extremely poor quality fake product 😾 the original is named “楚王鐘” in 殷周金文集成 (00072), or named as “楚邛仲南和鐘” in 歷代鍾鼎彝器款識法帖 卷六: https://archive.org/details/06052850.cn/page/n139/mode/2up


3

The characters are very deformed, but the best match to the writing looks like 富䝿(貴)昌矦(侯)王 Flourishing wealth and prosperity, fitting for the noblemen and king. 隹(唯)正月初吉丁亥,䠂(楚)王賸(媵)邛𠁩(中>仲)嬭𠆦(乍>作)嬭 'Tis the day of dīnghài of the first week of the first month, and the King of Chǔ gifts Second Lady 「嬭」 from the State of 「邛」 ... as dowry ...


1

I would say yes. "奪去你的重要支撐" is a sentence Chinese speakers would understand. It's reasonably accurate. It's the official translated lyrics and thoughts have been put into it. Could the translation be better? Maybe. There should be no concern that Chinese speakers would confuse the word 支撐 with "life support". Some translations of life ...


0

尤娜(Yuna) Heroine of a computer game! Have a look, see if she looks like you! ,是日本游戏制作商史克威尔艾尼克斯出品的电子游戏最终幻想系列第十部《Final Fantasy Ⅹ》(最终幻想Ⅹ)中的虚拟角色,女主角。 Heroine of a computer game! But apparently, there is a man's name Yona also translated as 尤娜


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It is very difficult to translate the lyric of a song to fit the rhyme, yet maintaining the meaning. In English, the song means "I care because it reminds me that it likes the floor has been pulled from your feet...". In Chinese, "我在乎啊. 那提醒了我, (就像你)失去了站立的依據...". or "失去了立足的憑藉"


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Chinese characters with /yun/ pinyin that suitable for female names: 雲(cloud), 苑(garden), 韻 (melody) Chinese characters with /na/ pinyin that suit for female names: 娜 (graceful), 南(south) Suggestions: 雲娜 /Yúnnà/ (graceful cloud) 韻娜 /Yùn nà/ (graceful melody) 苑南 /Yuàn nán/ (gardern in the south) 韻南 /Yùn nán/ (melody of the south) ~ Chinese characters with /yu/...


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"The reminders pull the floor from your feet" 觸景傷情 - seeing a place that stirs up my memories make me sad 睹物思人 - seeing an object remind me of someone I miss You can translate "The reminders" as "惹人感觸的景物" (sentimental places and objects are the reminders of someone no longer with us) As for "pull the floor from your feet&...


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First, you have to understand what 成精 (become a spirit) means in Chinese superstition. The belief is, abnormally intelligent animals or objects that last a long time, by chance, absorbed enough essence of the Sun and Moon (日月精華) - think of it as the power of the universe, would gain the ability to assume human form, possess human-level emotion and ...


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“Add oil” – what does it mean? It represents the metaphor of injecting fuel into a tank, or alternatively, stepping on an accelerator to propel a vehicle forward. But the use of “add oil” as an expression of encouragement is a creation of Cantonese: ga yao, or jiayou in Mandarin. Often accompanied by exclamation marks, it is a versatile phrase Chinese ...


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足球集训班 or 足球特训班, 集训 or 特训 is different from 训练班, though people won't know the schedule via the name.


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TianFuDaDaoBeiLu 1700Hao, Huan QiuZhongXin E1 1Dong 2DanYuan 1601Hao 天府大道北路 1700號, 環球中心 E1 1棟 2單元 1601號 City: cheng du shi City: 成都市 Voivodeship: si chuan sheng Province: 四川省 Country: PRC (China) Zip: 郵編610015


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You can say: 我三門課都得了A(I got A in three of my classes )the use of 都 here it simply tells that the fact that you got A is common for the three classes.


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When I was small, I went to 足球培训班, so this must make sense.


3

The characters are 「胡窯」, a maker's mark for Japanese arita ware. Google search 胡窯 to get more information and image hits.


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Actually there isn't much difference between them, unless use 的 verbatim for possession. The point is that the noun is representing a group. This might be a outcome of collectivism deeply rooted in Chinese culture. Also, traditionally those who has the opportunity to speak of the group are speak on behalf of the group. BTW, 我们 almost always includes the ...


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There is no precise translation for "wouldn't know if their backsides were on fire" which is good Chinese (屁股放火??火烧眉毛 = sth. urgent) but the meaning of that English phrase is simply "benighted", which is easily translated to: 蒙昧无知,汉语成语,拼音是méng mèi wú zhī,意思是没有知识,不明事理的意思。出自《晋书·阮种传》。 or akin: 愚昧无知 You have these people who have never left ...


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Not only in Chinese even in Luo speaking community(Acoli in Northern Uganda and South Sudan and all the Nilo people) do refers to "Wang" as water source(source of something) . This means in sounding is the same. example like Wang Oo=where friends and families gather during evening fireside,Wanglengo= village in Lamwo,Wang Bur= wound.


6

Tl;dr: In fixed expressions, 我 is less 'singular' than you think. Plurality is often picked up by context. Here are some example pairs of common collocations. Those that do not exist are labelled with an asterisk (*). "My" "Our" country 我的國家 我國(*我們國) city 我的城市 我城(*我們城) company 我(的)公司 我社(*我們社) school 我(的)學校 我校(*我們校) family 我(的)家 我們家 ...


6

If I want to emphasize it's my(singular) company, how to phrase My company in Chinese? You can use the possessive marker 的 to denote relating to or possession of an object noun. 我的公司 = my company (you don't own it, just work for it, so 的 indicates 'relating', not 'possessing') 我的公司 = my company (if you own it, 的 indicates possessing' not 'relating') This ...


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The government statement suggests PETA supporters only see things in their perspective, never care to consider other people's side, or look at the big picture, simply put - they are short-sighted (目光如豆), ignorant (愚昧無知) and don't know the suffering of the people (不知民間疾苦) ...wouldn’t know if their backside was on fire" ...他們後庭着火(自己)也不會知道 (they don't ...


0

养马: raise horses Where do you raise horses? 草原, grassland, prairie What colour is grass? 绿色 So we get from the phrase: 头上养马: (the top of) your head is green like a prairie to 戴绿帽子: wear a green hat (said of a man whose wife seeks the company of another man)


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I feel this phrase is a metaphor for 戴绿帽子(wear green hats), which means a man has become a cuckold because his wife cheats on him and sleeps with other men. (This is also why Chinese men usually don't wear green hats and would get impressed when they first see people celebrating the St. Patrick's Day.) 她给她老公戴了绿帽子。 她让她老公戴了绿帽子。 (She made her husband wear ...


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I don't see any problem for the first four translations, but for the last one, you used 會 to translate 'can', which is problematic: while English does not make the distinction between ability and permission when using 'can', Chinese does. When you say 會, as in 我會游泳 (I can swim), you are indicating ability (I am able to swim). When you say 可/可以, as in ...


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When this happened to me, I told my friend: 我有三门课得了A。 Or you can also say 我得了三门课的A。


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When I first saw an image of yuan-ti, I first thought of FuXi and NuWa, who were gods that were the ancestors of humans/ created humans in their image in ancient Chinese mythology. Depending on the version, they had human upper body and a snake lower body or a human head and snake body. This fits right into two types of yuan-ti. Further more, in mandarin, ...


0

幸運混蛋 is a very literal translation of 'lucky bastard'. The problem with this is that this is not an idiomatic expression in Chinese and can cause confusion. 混蛋 is also fairly derogatory, unlike the usage of 'bastard' here in English. If you intend the meaning 'someone with astounding good luck', and are very mindful of idiomaticity, 幸運兒 is a possible, ...


0

Despite the cynic fever on tattooing Chinese characters on one's body, let me try to help: 幸运混蛋(Simplified Chinese) 幸運混蛋(Traditional Chinese) They are correct translation for Lucky Bastard. But when someone reads it, it sounds a bit weird. Maybe you could consider this term: 混世魔王 It means a demon/monster king who disturbs the world.


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He is tall. 他很高。 He is somewhat tall. 他有点儿高。


2

挺 /tǐng/ = quite; rather If a man is 170 cm tall, he is of above-average height for a Chinese male (164.8 cm), and we can describe him as 挺高. But it is not that rare. On the other hand, a Chinese male over 190 cm tall has to be considered 很高 We only describe 姚明 as 很高 (very tall), never 挺高 (quite tall), I mean, he is really tall. More example: 85% mark is ...


1

Even in some cases regarding education, you can still use 軌. course = 課 curriculum = 軌 (approximately); the publication record, dozens of papers = 軌 (approximately) For point 2, there are many courses in the curriculum to develop certain skills. "curriculum" is usually translated to 課程, where 程 has the meaning of journey or track. Nowadays, China'...


0

我得了"A"在那三門課程, or 在那三門課程中我都得了"A". (You get A from the specific classes out of many) 在三門課程中我都得了"A". (You get A from all classes you are attending).


2

This is a result of the polysemy of the word 'course' in English. 課 and 軌 are fairly distinct characters in Cantonese. If you intend 'course' to mean 'A series of lectures or lessons in a particular subject, leading to an examination or qualification.', you use 課 (see a.), NEVER 軌. Sometimes, even if you use 'course' directly in Cantonese, it's ...


1

挺好的,挺好的。 tǐng hǎo de, tǐng hǎo de. Not bad, not bad. Note: because of tone sandhi of consecutive third tones, the first syllable is pronounced in the second tone instead of the third: tíng hǎo de, tíng hǎo de.


-1

(Assume A is the top score) I got A's in three of my classes. 我取得了三个班当中的最高分。 (You are good, I never got an A!!)


3

I think it can be translated as 学以致用. 学以致用 or 學以致用 is a Chinese idiom which means to study something in order to apply it. It probably comes from 《论语 子张》. The original text is 百工居肆以成其事,君子学以致其道 by English Workers toil and moil in the workshops to complete their job, while men of honor seek Tao by learning. As for your sentence I want to apply my knowledge ...


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