New answers tagged

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你好吗, as opposed to 你好, is seldom used because it implies asking whether the other person has or has not overcome some past problem or medical affliction. So, 你好 is straight forwardly wishing someone well, whereas 你好吗 is akin to an unsolicited question. If someone says to me 你好吗, I may jokingly reply, 我 有 什 么 不 好? In English you do not for no specific ...


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发财- basically translates to "recieve/send riches", this could come from the money that is traditionally given on the new year


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"恭喜你新年快樂" I think we normally say 祝你新年快樂, (wishing you a happy new year); 祝你生日快乐, (wishing you a happy birthday) 恭喜, is normally confined to congratulating someone; like getting married, graduating, job promotion, etc. You would therefore "wish", (祝你), and not "congratulate", (恭喜), someone to have a happy new year. Note:- 祝你 is used differently from 希望,...


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恭喜 (congratulations for joyous occasion) : "Bless you" is the standard opening for giving good wish to others, for example: 恭喜你大學畢業(congratulations on graduation from university), 恭喜你新居入伙 (congratulations on moving in to a new home). So "恭喜发财" (congratulations on getting rich) is just one of many things you can bless people with, no more common than "恭喜你新年快樂"...


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According to Chinese (mainland) national standard, only the metric prefix "mega-" (for 106) is 兆, while a trillion (1012) should always be 万亿, never 兆. e.g. 一兆字节 (or 一兆 for short) means one megabyte (1 MB), and 一兆赫 means one megahertz (1 MHz). http://zjj.beijing.gov.cn/wsbs/infoview.asp?ViewID=50494 10的6次方 兆 M 10的4次方称为万,10的8次方称为亿,10的12次方称为万亿 ...


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他们请经理吃了饭。 It was dinner that they invited the manager to have. 他们请了经理吃饭。 It was the manager that they invited to have dinner.


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Most likely, I'd say 他们请经理吃饭了 or 他们请经理吃了饭 in practice. 他们请了经理吃饭 might be ok, but it doesn't look a normal word order. Usually, we just say: 他们请了经理 meaning they invited the manager. What that invitation is for is often implied(assuming it can be figured out from the context). This is probably just me. Others might take different opinions.


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他们请经理吃了饭- subtle emphasize what they eat, but not necessarily. 他们请了经理吃饭- to emphasize who they buy dinner for There's another possible way to say this: 他们请经理吃饭了- subtle emphasis on the thing happened, but not necessarily. It really depends on how you say it, your tune can change the emphasis too. They all have the same meaning. The second one probably ...


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装: 贮放;藏 hold, store 那蝾螈仍旧在那个高玻璃杯装的水里扭来扭去, the salamander was still in the tall glass beaker, twisting and turning in the water, 连带:互相关连(关联) 恨不得跑过去把它拿起来连蝾螈带水泼在特朗奇布尔的头上。 (she) wished she could take the beaker and throw its contents in Trunchbull's face 把它拿起来连蝾螈带水 take the beaker and its (related) contents Oh Trunchbull, you're so sexy!


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I'll try answering this (but be aware I'm just a learner). The given examples are transitive vs. intransitive verbs: 说 vs. 说话. Here, 说 is a transitive verb (i.e., it takes an object) whereas 说话 is an intransitive verb (i.e., it doesn't take an object): 他说“你好” He says hello 你为什么那样说话? Why do you speak that way? We can alternatively think of 话 (...


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装 means contain, therefore 她再看那装着蝾螈的玻璃杯 means She glared at the glass with the newt (contained) in it. Here 连 means together with, therefore 恨不得跑过去把它拿起来连蝾螈带水泼在特朗奇布尔的头上 means She longed to march up and grab the glass and tip the contents, (with) newt and all, over the Trunchbull's head


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There are some examples from daily conversation or oral speakings: 1.我在上课,接不了电话。I'm in class so can't answer phone calls. 2.快上车!Get in the car!Quick! 3.和他们拼了!上刺刀!Fight out with them! Charge your bayonets! 4.用餐请上4楼。4F for dinner. The character "上" could have many kinds of meanings Maybe like the word "go" or "do" in English depending on specific situation. ...


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Maybe a look at the origins might help. You can look here or here. I can't say how accurate the links are. I think, the original 会 meant "can, may by assent," or maybe "know." Part of 会 is mouth-speaking-yue 曰 yuē. English 'can' is rooted in the word 'know'. Here are many experts in Chinese etymology who know much better than I. 会:聚合,合在一起 会合: meet 会议:...


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As said in another answer: 会 means you have the knowledge necessary to do something 能 means you have the ability/permission to do something 可以 means you have permission to do something. However, I think there's something missing from the answer when you regard these in terms of intent. In certain cases of using 会, you can be emphasizing that ...


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For some cases, 能 and 会 doesn't have too much difference, for example, 我能写字 and 我会写字。 However, in some examples, 能 and 会 can mean different implications. For example, 我能去 vs 我会去. and this is how I interpret it: 我能去 means you can go, but you don't have to go. Similar for 可以. 会 means you can go and you will go.


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This has been covered on nearly every Chinese learning platform and is one of the first problems learners encounter. Without being too mean I do have to ask, what amount of prior research have you done? 会 means you have the knowledge necessary to do something 能 means you have the ability to do something (nothing preventing you from doing it) lastly 可以 ...


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The verb "上" means "to achieve or reach (a certain quantity or degree)", often followed by an object indicating quality. It is a mistake to state "上" as a verb in this context. The correct role of "上" here is a "result complement" [Verb + result complement] is often mistaken as a single verb, for example: 當上, 升上, 爬上 Example: 當上局長 = become director ...


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The definite article has no equivalence in Chinese. Its functions, however, can be found in Chinese. Something previously mentioned or known Compare: He is a murderer. 他是个杀人犯。(杀人犯 is a murderer, a man that has commited murder. 个 is like the indefinite article.) He is the murderer. By using nouns inherently specific. 他就是凶手。(凶手 is the murderer , it ...


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The is rarely explicitly expressed in Chinese. Like the comments mentioned below your question, the closest equivalent is going to be a combination of 这 (this) or 那 (that) and the appropriate measure word. You might notice Chinese ESL speakers struggle with definite articles in English and that is because similar usage is not found in Chinese. As for the ...


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Seems you have the same problem as me! :( I cannot pronounce the four tones well. 我不能准确地发音四个声调。


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I think it's OK with or without 了 因为我喜欢读中文书,所以我开始了自学汉语。 因为我喜欢读中文书,所以我开始自学汉语。 The problem, as I see it, is: How can you know you like to read Chinese books before you have studied Chinese?? You cannot have read any! Kind of grates on logic! 为了能够看懂中文,我开始了自学汉语。 In order to be able to read Chinese, I began to study the Chinese language.


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说话 means to speak/talk 话说 generally means "(to) speak/talk about", for example: 1. 话说中国 (to talk about China) 2. 话说这个我不太明白 (speaking about this, I don't quite understand)


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说话 means 'talking', 话说 means 'by the way', ‘they say’. As an addition to @魏小淇's excellent answer. You can view 话说 as 'according to some' or 'they say', like 'according to some, seems like Mr. Wang was fired yesterday' ‘话说,王先生好像昨天被开除了’ although, it seems like 听说 can be used too in that context


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You need to differentiate them as "话说" carries a different meaning. It is used when people want to start a topic. It is very commonly used in ancient novels, where authors always speak as a storyteller and use "话说" to begin the story. In informal conversations someone may also use it now (actually I used to say it many times), a little like "by the way" in ...


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I am a native speaker. For the example you made I feel some of them would be more authentic if you use other verbs instead of 上 for example: 这本书我读了15页。 (From this book, I've read up to page 15.) 我给自己剪头发了。 (I cut my own hair.) (I stay in a hotel in Beijing for 3 months.) This one sounds a little bit weird in the tense itself. If you want to say "I am going ...


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