6

One such website is: http://www.hanzigrids.com Another website is http://cop.yes-chinese.com/hanban/tzg/ but it has less features and you can't choose your font.


5

I think it is a terrible mistake that the website has made, because there is no occasion when qu is pronounced tsʰu in Mandarin. Since you can actually tell the difference between u and ü, things should be easier for you now. You can just memorise that after (pinyin) j, q, x, y, ü is always written as u, and if you see u after j, q, x, y, it's always ...


5

The Outlier Dictionary of Chinese Characters, when it's finally ready, will be a user-friendly reference about the etymology of Chinese characters, together with mnemonics that can help learning them. The great thing about it is that it is going to be based on modern etymology scholarship, in contrast to many other resources that are based either folk ...


4

http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx?characterInput=%E8%BB%8A&submitButton1=Etymology This website gives origins for many characters, as well as pictures of some earlier forms (e.g., from Oracle bones). Keep in mind that the structure of most characters is a phonetic and a semantic component put together (形声字). Most characters aren't ...


3

This online dictionary seems the right tool for you http://www.zdic.net/ It looks up the character's definition in several modern and ancient dictionaries, you can also see how the pronunciation and writing has evolved over thousands of years, being different today between mandarin and dialects, traditional and simplified.


3

An explanation that "cookie"/"cookies" (the English words) are used in Chinese has already been given. But to give an idea of where and how this phrase is used: It's staightforward to Baidu search for 浏览器cookies = "browser cookies" and come up with many examples of this phrase being used in the context of browsers. It can be found used in company privacy ...


3

We also say "Cookie(s)" actually, because in Chinese "Cookies" is "存储在用户本地终端上的数据" which is an explanation rather than a word, and it's too long.


3

I don't think it is a proper question for this site, but I do web developing as well. The reality As you know, Chinese fonts are not easy to make because we have thousands of characters, so we only have a few fonts. The most used fonts are PMingLiU(serif), Microsoft JhengHei(san-serif) and image font for headings like in Apple's website. How I would ...


3

I have checked a few random news sites from HK and Taiwan, here are some examples of defining the font or font-family property: font-family: PMingLiu, mingliu, "細明體_HKSCS-ExtB", "Ming(for ISO10646)ExtB", Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font: 18px/1.7 "Microsoft YaHei", "Verdana", "Arial", "PMingLiU", "sans-serif"; font: 15px/24px Simsun; ...


3

For streaming video, it is common to say: 低清 (under 480p = 480 horizontal lines) 標清 (DVD resolution: 480p/576p) 高清 (720p or above) Downloadable videos are sometimes marked as "超高清", which may mean 1080p (or even 4K), or simply a high bitrate 720p encode having excellent quality.


2

I have never looked for this kind of a tool before - good idea! I just ran a search using and came across an online tool that will do what you ask: http://zhongwenzhuanpinyin.51240.com/ If you can read a little bit of Chinese, I would recommend trying this one. It will convert your Chinese characters to pinyin and show tones. I have read on many Chinese ...


2

On Android you could try the "Pinyin Web Browser" app in the Play Store (free and no ads), or "Cantonese Web Browser" for Sidney Lau / Yale. Both apps print their romanisation with word-groupings, formatted as large as the characters, and cope with on-page changes made by Javascript etc (the two apps also share their bookmarks with each other). But because ...


2

First, there is no legal source to download both of them. More specific, they're content of copyright. The Commercial Press has made great effort to ban online version to protect its interest. So you can hardly find the website which is providing PDF or other format. However, there's another way, but you'd pay a little money(~$2). Visit the greatest ...


1

It shows a server error (503), so you probably can't do anything about it, except using another dictionary. Try one of these: LINE Dict Chinese-English MDBG Chinese Dictionary Chinese Dictionary


1

Generation poems are specific to a particular male line of a family, rather than everyone sharing a surname. Unless one of your ancestors along the male line decided to choose a generation poem, you won't have one - but that is quite normal! More information in English: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_name#Generation_poem


1

Are you looking for subtitles like this? You can try to link


1

May I suggest 漢語多功能字庫, maintained by the Chinese University of Hong Kong, which has a Chinese/English interface, shows character in various scripts, components and pronunciations; and explains etymologies. http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/


1

http://xh.5156edu.com/conversion.html copy the text that you want to convert and paste it in in the upper box, click on "查拼音" and you'll get the pinyin in the lower box. hope this help


1

http://hanyu.iciba.com/pinyin.html and http://www.ifreesite.com/phonetic/ These websites may do the work, but only for plain text.


1

Sorry pal, I don't think such software exist for a simple reason of exponential combination process. Chinese pronunciation has so many rules. Add on top of that, there are "occasional" special cases which may be frequent in usage. I gave it a minutes and I couldn't see how such a software could be designed to translate Chinese text to sound symbol. The ...


1

To PinYin Please use: Chinese version of word or WPS, in word you can see: 用鼠标选中需要注音的文字(拖黑)——格式——中文版式——拼音(Word2003,XP……) for Word2007 or above version, switch to "Home" page and then click this:


1

There are many accents, but I will try to describe the pronunciation. I don't know phonetic characters, but if you go by an American accent, 去 sounds a lot like "chew" if one were to say it fast, adding more of a "ts" sound at the beginning, with a downward inflection, and emphasize the "ee" sound. Just listen to people talk, and imitate them.


1

Another one is http://www.chine-culture.com/en/chinese/chinese-writing-grids-generator.php If you learn Chinese you will like there's pinyin on my grids : https://www.dropbox.com/s/rxzdhaze85qaq8w/liens%20de%20t%C3%A9l%C3%A9chargement%20grille%20%C3%A9criture.docx?dl=0 follow that link to get updates : https://www.facebook.com/saintj0seph


1

There are a lot of grids available Hanzi Practice Sheets II and a free customizable one here Hanzi Practice Sheets. There is also Arch Chinese.


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