11

"I thought 您 is more polite and honorific and thus should be used when address Jehovah. Why was "you" translated as "你" instead of "您"?" 你 is, in fact, the correct translation, not only linguistically; but theologically as well. Because God is Father, the familiar form of the second person is appropriate. A little ...


11

有(一)点 as a set can use to mean "a little too...". See this Chinese Grammar Wiki page. Some examples from the page: 我 有点 饿 。 I'm a little hungry. 这个 菜 有点 辣 。 This dish is a little too spicy. 昨天 有一点 热 。 Yesterday it was a little too hot. 是 does not have this usage, so 他是一点儿严厉 is wrong. However, you can say 他是有一点儿严厉, where 是 is used for emphasis.


9

国籍 = nationality (as based on what nation you are from) 民族 = ethnic group For the majority of Chinese people their: 国籍 = 中国 (Chinese) 民族 = 汉 (Han)


7

Obviously it was referring to the host 關灝泉 Kwan Ho Chuen(香港中文大學哲學系博士生) In Hong Kong, people often nickname someone by his job. For example. 李先生 is a 經紀, people who mainly know him as a 經紀 might nickname him 經紀李 More examples: 張家強 is a 豆腐店店主,people who order tofu from him might nickname him 豆腐強 黃國興 is a 律師, people might nickname him 律師黃 In the video ...


6

As other answers pointed out, 千万 is usually used as a warning. 千万 typically implies a reason why you should or should not do something (Otherwise you would suffer a certain consequence). E.g. 你走路时千万要小心 (否则很容易摔倒). If you want to emphasize the strength of your dislike in your example, you can say: 我真不喜欢抽烟。// I really don't like smoking. You can use other ...


6

These words are very similar. 队 and 团 are almost the same. For example, we can call the band that attend competitions either 乐队 or 乐团; we can call a choir either 合唱队 or 合唱团. We also often put these two words together: "团队," which means "team". For example: 我们是一个团队。 We are a team. If you really want tell a difference between 队 and 团, ...


5

Let's begin with 什么都 meaning "everything"; see Expressing "everything" with "shenme dou" at the Chinese Grammar Wiki. We can add a verb or an adjective afterwards: 什么都 + adjective 什么都美丽 (everything is beautiful) 什么都辣 (everything is spicy) 什么都简单 (everything is simple) which we negate with 不: 什么都不美丽 (everything is not ...


5

'故意' implying someone intend to do some bad things. If you want to say someone intend to do things specially. You can use '特意'. This word do not imply any bad or good intention. It only emphasize 'specially'. But in most of case, Chinese love to use it in positive senarios, like me. 为了让学生听得明白,我们老师特意把语速放慢。 在下班的路上,他特意绕路去医院看望母亲。


5

Neither. If you used to be x and you're not any more you'd just use a construct like: 以前很x like: (我)以前很胖 Of course, 很 doesn't necessarily mean really or very, but if you want to change it to 有点 that's cool too: (我)以前有点(儿)胖


5

From my answer to this question: "What is the purpose of verb reduplication?": phrases like 笑笑,看看,走走 or 吃吃 are verb reduplication, it serves to indicate the verb is in a slight degree or a casual manner The fundamental meaning of the sentence is not change by the verb reduplication, but the tone of the sentence is changed by it: 等他回来的时候问他。- "ask him ...


5

开心 can be either joyful, delighted or the mood of happiness. 快乐 is the mood of happiness. The dictionary defines it as: 形容称心如意的心情 So, we say 我今天玩得很开心,not 我今天玩得很快乐. But they can be synonyms as in 和他在一起很开心/快乐. In this case, both denote the sense of the mood of happiness.


5

Arh hah, let me tell you the new generation expressions! 『同性恋者』is too formal to address a gay man. I would say it's equivalent to "homosexual". The popular terms to the concept in Chinese have nothing to do with their original meanings, just as "gay" now has nothing to do with "joyous", but instead, they directly take after English counterparts. 他显然并非直男。 ...


5

Per CantoDict: 成 ... [5] [n] one tenth; 10 per cent so it's usually used with round numbers where you could use 十分之~ 一成股權 = 10% equity 牛排拷到七成熟 = Steak grilled to 70% done 十成功力 = 100% strength but in the following format can be used for exact percentages 一成三的股權 = 13% of equity 九成九是他 = 99% certain it is him The only real place where you'll see an ...


5

The key character in 相信 is 信 which means faith/trust. (相 is just there to turn 信 into a standard two-character word. It can be omitted in spoken language.) I.e. there's some emotion involved. The object can also be a person or a belief (i.e. equivalent to "believe in"). For example, 我相信你 means "I trust you"/"I have faith in you/what ...


5

In my opinion, this question is not specific in Chinese. In fact, many languages use the singular form of the second person to address God. Here is a quote from Wikipedia's article "thou". Early English translations of the Bible used the familiar singular form of the second person, which mirrors common usage trends in other languages. The familiar ...


5

一点 makes 有 valid. According to dictionaries, one of the usage of 有 is to describe extent (how large, how big, how severe, etc.). E. g. 他有两米高. (not 他有高). In your case, 他有一点儿严厉 makes sense, whilst 他有严厉 does not because it doesn't specify the extent(一点儿). 是 + adj is used for emphasis, denoting the sense of really or indeed. E. g. 他是严厉(he's indeed strict)。...


4

回转 = "rotate" e.g. "1000rpm" means "rotate 1000 times per minute" = "每分鐘回转1000 次" 回转 (至相反方向) = "rotate to opposite direction" = "turn 180°/ turn around" ~ 调头 = "turn around" (to the opposite direction) 掉头 = "turn one's head; turn around" 调头 and 掉头 are interchangeable when it means "turn around" But 掉头 can mean "turn one's head" in different ...


4

This dictionary definition explains the use of 一: 表示猛然发出某种动作或突然出现某种情况 E.g. 往起一站 / 右手一挥 / 眼前一黑。 Basically, this use of 一 expresses the suddenness of an action either intentionally or unintentionally.


4

In your case, both 开心 and 快乐 are used as adjectives, which denote “happy”. Translated, the sentence means “I am happy when you are happy.” However, only 快乐 can also be used as a noun. “他从做善事当中获得快乐。” This would mean “he obtains happiness from doing good deeds”. It would sound weird if you substituted 快乐 with 开心, which would then make it “he obtains happy ...


4

There is a story. There is a Japanese cellphone game called “Princess Connect! Re:Dive” (プリンセスコネクト! Re:Dive). Before it was officially released in China, people are discussing which is the correct translation of the name, because in the context all these words have almost the same meaning "connected". But when it is released the official name 公主连结 is the ...


4

“码头”这个写法出现得较晚,是后人加会意偏旁新造的词形。早期语料中基本上都是“马头”的。 《资治通鉴》中就出现过“马头”。胡三省(读[xǐnɡ]!)《注》:“附河岸筑土植木夹之至水次,以便兵马入船,谓之马头。”这个解释是可信的。其中这个“头”字,应该是表某特定功能的建筑的后缀。比如文献中常见的“宿头”,就是住宿的地方。 @清洁工 on 果壳问答 According to this, you're half right. It is original "马头", but not because its shape, but its use. Its use in ancient time is to make soldiers, especially cavalry, easy to ...


4

显示 = indicate 消息显示 - The announcer observes the information that's available and provides a report to the audience The source of the information may or may not have provided the material directly to the announcer 称 = announce/ claim 消息称 - The announcer directly relays the announcement or claim from the source of information to the audience The source of ...


3

I'd like to say something different. 炸醬麵 is the only correct word. We need to clarify why Zhajiangmian is called so. Zhajiangmian originated from Shandong Province, and the core of it is the sauce, Zhajiang. Usually, Zhajiang is cooked with minced pork and soybean paste stirred in large quantity of oil, which looks like deep-frying the sauce in the wok, thus ...


3

Don't know about China, but in Taiwan 回轉 mostly explicitly means u-turn performed by a vehicle. As for 掉頭, in addition to the literal "turn your head", you can use it whenever you are heading from A to B, then suddenly requires to return to A. Example, when you are going to work by taxi, and your just found out you forget to bring something important, ...


3

Try: 虽然这是两棵不同的植物,但我们到底应该怎样来区分呢?// Though these are two different plants, how on earth should we distinguish them?


3

Characters with "mouth radicals" are often chosen for transliterations. This is especially helpful to show that it is a proper noun rather than anything else, otherwise the reader might try and put meaning into characters that are simply there for their associated sounds. A similar concept can be seen in Chinese onomatopoeia. For instance "choo-choo" the ...


3

The idiom 评头论足 is a normal phrase for this setting and has a negative connotation as well. E. g. 他总是对别人评头论足。


3

(native chinese speaker here) 判断 in Chinese doesn't have the negative connotation as judge in English does. 判断 simply means to make an estimation/distinguishment based on what the person knows/feels. Besides, we never say 判断 sb., instead, we say 判断 sth., or use it as a verb. e.g.: How to 判断 (verb. =determine) whether sth. is ... or not According to my 判断 ...


3

很快就有人去了 This uses a variation of the grammar structure: 快 + Verb + 了 When using 快 ⋯⋯了 (kuài... le) with verbs, it takes on a meaning similar to the English "just about to." Normally you can add 要 (yào) before the verb. 快⋯⋯了 (kuài... le) with Verbs, Chinese Grammar Wiki In this case what's about to happen is 去 ("to go"), it's happening ...


3

According to Wiktionary, 保祐 is a variant of 保佑. Google Ngram Viewer also consider 天祐 to be the same as 天佑: Ngram Actually, here in mainland China, I think 佑 is much more prevalent than 祐 (I have not been to other Chinese-speaking areas so I cannot give you a definitive answer). You can witness it from the Wikipedia translation of similar subjects, all of ...


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