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电子 I did some searching, and my impression is that most terms in English with the prefix "e-" can be translated into Chinese with the prefix 电子, with virtually no exceptions: 电子邮件 (email), 电子邮箱 = 电子信箱 (email box), 电子文件 (e-file), 电子现金 (e-cash), 电子货币 (e-money), 电子客票 (e-ticket), 电子签名 (e-signature), 电子学习 (e-learning), 电子教育 (e-education), 电子书 = 电子书籍 (e-book), ...


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Probably you can find the negative meaning of 一条狗 from 周星驰 (Stephen Chow)'s movie 《大话西游之仙履奇缘》: “那个人样子好怪,他好像一条狗。” That person looks strange, he looks like a dog. or “你看,那个人好像一条狗哎。” You see that person? He looks like a dog. "一条狗" here indicates they thought that person is a "poor guy" rather than "a dog". But don't use this if you're not ...


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In your case, both 开心 and 快乐 are used as adjectives, which denote “happy”. Translated, the sentence means “I am happy when you are happy.” However, only 快乐 can also be used as a noun. “他从做善事当中获得快乐。” This would mean “he obtains happiness from doing good deeds”. It would sound weird if you substituted 快乐 with 开心, which would then make it “he obtains happy ...


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开心 can be either joyful, delighted or the mood of happiness. 快乐 is the mood of happiness. The dictionary defines it as: 形容称心如意的心情 So, we say 我今天玩得很开心,not 我今天玩得很快乐. But they can be synonyms as in 和他在一起很开心/快乐. In this case, both denote the sense of the mood of happiness.


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I think they can be used interchangeably. When it used in songs or poems, rhythm is more important than which word to be used. Sometimes, to avoid using the same word in one sentence, people tend to use a different one too.


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How about listening to this song sung in Hokkien / Fujian dialect where the "Gua ai li" is all over the place. https://youtu.be/6XnNatTmtvk As for "Wa ai lo or lu", could it be the product of a historical "mixture" of the Hokkien dialect with the indigenous Malay language because if you Google Translate "Lu" from Malay to Chinese you get 你们 If you go to ...


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This dictionary definition explains the use of 一: 表示猛然发出某种动作或突然出现某种情况 E.g. 往起一站 / 右手一挥 / 眼前一黑。 Basically, this use of 一 expresses the suddenness of an action either intentionally or unintentionally.


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Well, what does a big belly do? It sticks out, protrudes! Have a look here, definition 2. especially: 凸出 2 伸直,凸出:~直。~起腰。 雪人大肚子一挺,他顽皮地说:“我就是冬天。“ The snowman, with his big belly sticking out, playfully said, "I am winter." (There is a German joke about big-bellied men, this just reminded me of it, but you'd have to know German to understand it: Er ist ein ...


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Quote:- "Has the meaning or feeling of the sentence changed? Is either preferred in some contexts?" (1) the meaning has not changed. (2) the "feeling" may have shifted, if by feeling you mean the thought-processes you wish to convey to or impress upon the listener. The 既是,也是 is to convey to the listener the "contra-duality" of a certain personal ...


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我是一个语言的从教者,也是一个语言学习的爱好者。 This sentence reminds us of the fact that I'm also a language hobbyist(assuming I'm well known as a 语言的从教者). 我既是一个语言的从教者,也是一个语言学习的爱好者。 With 既, it parallels the two roles (语言的从教者 and 语言学习的爱好者), which share the same level of importance.


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Quote:- "发生了什么事? What happened? Is it incorrect to write instead: 发生了什么? Any difference?" Answer:- (a) both are correctly phrased. (b) any difference? The difference is situational. Consider the following scenarios:- (1) You walk into your office and everyone is unusually quiet; you have no idea why. You would naturally ask -- 发生了什么? So it's ...


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发生了什么事? 事 refers to 事情(affair, matter, thing, etc). 什么事情 is specific - what thing. 发生了什么 is generic. They can be interchangeable in most of context, in which we take 发生了什么 as the shorthand for 发生了什么事. However, 发生了什么 could also be shorthand for 发生了什么现象,发生了什么反应,发生了什么变化,etc. E.g. 这两种物质混在一起会发生什么?== 这两种物质混在一起会发生什么现象/变化? In the case above, 这两种物质混在一起会发生什么事 ...


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Characters with "mouth radicals" are often chosen for transliterations. This is especially helpful to show that it is a proper noun rather than anything else, otherwise the reader might try and put meaning into characters that are simply there for their associated sounds. A similar concept can be seen in Chinese onomatopoeia. For instance "choo-choo" the ...


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虽然这是两棵不同的植物,但是我看不出到底有什么不同。= ...I can't see how on earth they are different.


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Try: 虽然这是两棵不同的植物,但我们到底应该怎样来区分呢?// Though these are two different plants, how on earth should we distinguish them?


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When you start the first part of a sentence with a 虽然 (although), the second part would always start with a "but" (但/卻) 虽然这是两棵不同的植物,但[到底]也都是兰科植物。 Although these are two different plants, they are both in the same orchid family [after all]. (两者都会患只有兰科植物会患的病) (Both would suffer from disease that only infect orchid plants)


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