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20

The word your hear is probably 那個 (in traditional characters) / 那个 (in simplified characters). It is pronounced nàge or nèige (in the Pinyin transcription), and it's basic meaning is ‘that’ or ‘that one’. Chinese Grammar Wiki has a nice explanation of how nèige is used as a filler word (follow the link to see examples): In conversation, you may find ...


13

It means one of these dogs wears a red sweater. ...里 literally means in/among ..., and it is followed by 有一只, which means there is one. Hence the whole sentence translates literally as Among these dogs there is one wearing a red sweater.


13

This pattern, like you mentioned, seems to be referred to as "A里AB"式 in Chinese. A quick search came up with the following list of words: 糊里糊涂hū lǐ hū tú 怪里怪气guài lǐ guài qì 流里流气liú lǐ liú qì 傻里傻气shǎ lǐ shǎ qì 土里土气tǔ lǐ tǔ qì 慌里慌张huāng lǐ huāng zhāng 妖里妖气yāo lǐ yāo qì 彻里彻外chè lǐ chè wài 胡里胡涂hú lǐ hú tú 没里没外méi lǐ méi wài 秀里秀气xiù lǐ xiù qì 歇里歇松xiē ...


12

There are lots of them, here's what I can recall: T恤衫,T-shirt X光片,X ray image 卡拉OK,karaoke K线图,Candlestick chart A型血,Blood Type A P图(v.),Photoshop an image 维生素C,Vitamin C O型腿,Blount's diseas TCP协议,Transmission Control Protocol RSS源,RSS feed UI设计,User Interface design All of the words are widely used, most of them combine the English letter and ...


11

@OmniBus "those modern fonts are terrible and distinct nothing"—you may despise modern fonts all you like, but when you pick up any calligraphy collection (書法字典) you will find abundant evidence that you'll have to extend your despisal to such names like 王羲之, 歐陽詢, 唐太宗 and so on, as they did not make those distinctions. Also, where the typographic distinction ...


11

This is an interesting question, because it allows us to look at how words are formed in modern Chinese. The Characters Both 兒 and 子 meant "child" or "son" in ancient Chinese. 兒 was more specific, while 子 had a variety of other uses, like "master" (as in 孔子 - master Kong/Confucius). When 子 meant child, it was somewhat inclusive of female children, although ...


10

G.Depardieu is Jean Reno's 二货朋友 in Tais-toi. Joey Tribbiani is the 二货朋友 in Friends. As Stan mentioned above, 二货 is an affectionate way to refer to a friend that may not be a genius but everyone loves him. 二: stupid. 货: buddy/man/stuff. More usage: 吃货 is one that admires good food(in a less graceful way). A refined 吃货 is a 美食家(gourmet). 女人如衣服 means "women ...


10

欲 -- willing, want 速 -- speedy, quick 则 -- then, but 不 -- not, negative 达 -- arrive, done If you want to finish it quicker, then you probably can't get it done (correctly).


10

From wiki: the spelling "Taipei" derives from the Wade–Giles romanization T'ai-pei. "Taibei" is pinyin, which iOS supports as an input method. Wade-Giles used to be the standard method of romanization so it shows up in a lot of older Chinese names like "Chiang Ching-kuo". Pinyin has its own disadvantages, especially when spoken by English speakers. ...


10

四隅(four corners of a room) 宧(yí / ㄧˊ):室內東北角(northeastern corner) 窔(yào / ㄧㄠˋ )同“穾”:室內東南角(southeast corner) 奥(ào / ㄠˋ):室內西南角(southwest corner) 屋漏(wū lòu / ㄨ ㄌㄡˋ):室內西北角(northwest corner)


10

臵 (U+81F5) [ gé | ㄍㄜˊ ] From 《康熙字典》: 《集韻》「各額」切,音「格」。與「𢓜」同。「至」也。 Same as 𢓜. It means "to arrive" or "to go to". 又《六書原》徦,俗作臵。 The original or formal form of 徦. 徦 (U+5FA6) [ jiǎ | ㄐㄧㄚˇ ] 1. 至;到。(to arrive; to go to) 2. 來。(to come) 3. 姓。(surname)


10

《說文解字》似乎並無「奈」之條目。 It seems that 《說文解字》 does not have the entry of 奈. 「奈」由「柰」衍生而來,可能是新造字,也可能是誤寫。「柰」的本義是「果名」,借用為「柰何」,猶言「如何」。後來,分成「柰」表「果名」,而「奈」則專用在「奈何」之類的字詞。 奈 was derived from 柰. It might be a new word, or due to miswriting. The original meaning of 柰 is the name of a fruit. 柰 is then borrowed and used in 柰何, which means 如何 (how; what; what way). Later, in ...


10

1.字 = character, 词 = word 2."一个字,非常棒" can be either an incorrect translation (which is not rare in big companies' products) or a net slang phrase("一个字,XXX" where XXX is intentionally more than one character, similar to "brief comment: XXX")


9

It is a short word for "丫头养的" only used in area around Beijing city,"丫头" means slave girl or young girl servant. "养的" means feed by. This is bad language saying somebody's mother is young girl servant, some kind of "son of bitch". However this talking is generalized nowadays, "你丫..." is more compare to "You fucking ..."(你他妈的...)


9

事 can also be a verb for 'to serve; to work for' e.g. 忠臣不事二主 (a loyal vassal does not serve/ work for two masters) Since 从 itself has many different meanings, just say 从 is not specific enough. Adding a similar verb 事 and form the compound word 从事 make it a specific term for 'to engage in' (a field/ industry) 从政 = to undertake a political career 从商 = to ...


8

If not, why not? There is no exact one-word equivalent of the concept of "freedom" in ancient Chinese, just as there are no exact one-word equivalent of 仁, 理, 道, etc. in Latin, Greek or any Western languages. That's not surprising: it is what makes our world an interesting world of differences. It doesn't mean ancient Chinese did not have or need or seek ...


8

Question: 古文中哪个字有自由不受约束的意思啊? (Gǔwén zhōng nǎge zì yǒu zìyóu bu shòu yuēshù de yìsi a) - Which word in Ancient Chinese means Free and/or Unfettered? Source: Bai Du It appears there aren't single words, in modern and ancient Chinese, that have a denotative meaning of "Freedom". There are however, connotative words that can mean "free" or "to set free" in ...


8

In Simplified Chinese, 只 is polyphonic. In the sentence, 只 means only, pronounced zhǐ. The meaning you cited corresponds to another pronunciation, zhī, of the character.


8

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/duang-how-jackie-chan-helped-780040 Citation, with explanation of the word in bold: Think that your hair is looking particularly good today? In Chinese popular culture, it's looking "duang." A Chinese phrase that came out of nowhere, "duang" has taken the Internet by storm, even though many don't really know ...


8

In Cantonese, 先生 can be shortened to 生 when attached to a family name. It is used for adult male, all ages and is used orally, not written.


8

Think of the phrase "You fool!" or "you idiot" - depend on the relationship between the two people, the reason behind saying that, and the tone of the speech, it can be a playful, affectionate flirt, or a contemptuous comment. 笨蛋 is such a word. Of course it is a degrading term. But 笨蛋 is not a word of hate in general. Only best friends would call each ...


8

ABC's entry for 呀 says: 呀 ya5 (replacing a (啊) when preceding word ends in a, e, i, o, or (y)u) 快来呀! Kuài lái ya! Come quickly! 呀 is a replacement for 啊 when it comes after a vowel. This is also corroborated by《规范》's entry: 助 “啊(a)”受前一个音节末尾音素ɑ、e、o、i、ü的影响产生音变而采用的不同写法 说话(huà)呀 | 车(chē)呀 | 你说(shuō)呀 | 起来(lái)呀 | 快去(qù)呀。


8

"你丫" is a phrase from Beijing dialect. The word "丫" itself doesn't have a meaning in this context. It is a slang, not an appropriate way of speaking. You can think of it as adding F words in an English sentence. "你丫" is not as flexible as the F word though. For example, you can't say "他丫". This is a special phrase only appear in the second person pronoun ...


8

The primary meaning of 從(从)is to "follow". In English, we may describe participating/engaging in X as "pursuing" X. The logic in Chinese is similar. https://www.moedict.tw/%E5%BE%9E 參與。 To participate. 如:「從事」、「從政」。 As in: "pursue/participate", "pursue politics".


8

老 (old) is a common word for making nicknames (indicates casualness, familiarity, or fondness). For example, you met someone and called him 李先生 (Mr. Lee) which is a formal address. Later you two became familiar with each other and you might start calling him 老李 instead, (similar to 'John' became 'Johny' in English) 外 (outside) 國 (country) 人 (people) people ...


7

Did some research, but all I can find is that both 左 and 右 are actually the same symbol that denotes hand but reversed horizontally in ancient times. This symbol basically formed the top part of the character, which now pointed at same direction. When I was in kindergarten, my teach used to help us to remember them by telling us 右 has a 口 in it, so it's the ...


7

生 Short for 先生 in Cantonese 先生 is gender neutral in Chinese, however most people use it as the Chinese version of "Mr." Profession that is associated with 先生 is teachers (still used very often in the 80s and 90s. But thanks to the Communists such elegant term is abolished and people have started to call teachers as 老師 even in Cantonese). So if your Chinese ...


7

This is a rare example of Chinese translation for foreign cities or the similar, there's no rule to govern this type. In short it translates literally the meaning of Oxford: Ox: 公牛, 牛 Ford: ferry, 津,水渡也。——《说文》 Hence, Oxford == 牛津 The meaning of ferry in 津 is not seen often in modern Chinese, here are a few examples: 天津, 天子之津渡。 城阙辅三秦 风烟望五津 ----送杜少府之任蜀川 王勃 ...


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