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8x8: Lowest necessary resolution for Chinese characters As far as I know, the recognizable lowest resolution for Chinese characters, is about 8x8 pixels. The following paragraphs are rendered by the Special SimSun font's smallest 8x8 bitmap glyphs (Note: "Before Revision" is rendered by the Windows Vista's default simsun.ttc; "After Revision" shows how ...


20

1) Ensure correct proportions between all parts. Don't scrunch in. Don't squeeze down. Don't squeeze together. 2) Radicals should be smaller on top and thinner on sides. Don't make radicals the same size as the rest of the character. 3) Horizontal strokes appear much nicer if they go up at a slight angle. 4) Ensure vertical strokes don't go off at a weird ...


17

Brief Answers Is it indeed the case that the lower component of 䏍 is different from the lower component of 青? Yes in the etymology sense (the lower component of 䏍 is 肉, and the lower component of 青 is 丹), but it's not necessary to distinguish them in your hand writing – though, maybe some teachers, especially those in Taiwan, encourage you to do so – you ...


14

In restaurants (茶餐廳) in Hong Kong, the "waiters" also face this problem because writing in a formal and clear way takes too much time. They developed methods so that they can take orders faster: Write words with other words that has the same pronunciation. For example, instead of writing the word 「飯」(faan6), they would write 「反」(faan2) because they both ...


14

I think those are generally fine for normal purposes, especially if you're emailing. Traditional etiquette has substantially declined with email use. 亲爱 is quite a bit more personal than the equivalent English "Dear xxx" though, so you could replace that with just a greeting, e.g. "王先生您好 But since you asked for "proper etiquette"... Here's a brief rundown ...


13

In my experience, when referring to a single subject, I have never seen 他 used as a female pronoun. 她 is used for females, and 它 used for non-gendered or non-human subjects. Do note that 他 has meanings outside pronouns; it can have the meaning of "other". In these cases, 他 is used and never 她. Examples include 他人 (other people), 他乡 (a place far away from ...


12

The official way to write Chinese uses Chinese characters, which is not an alphabetical system. There have been various phonetic systems developed to either write or transcribe Chinese. Some of these systems are alphabets. To emphasise, these phonetic systems are not official ways of writing Chinese. The official way of writing, using characters, does not ...


11

The premise of the question is a bit backwards. It's not that de evolved into three different characters, it's that three different words evolved to have the same pronunciation in modern Mandarin Chinese. Mandarin in particular, features unstressed syllables, which are commonly referred to as having a "neutral tone" rather than having one of the four main ...


9

I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier and I'm even more surprised no one thought of this before me, well, I'm sure someone did just didn't find it on the internet. I was installing fonts and noticed some of the fonts that came with my operating system - OS X Mountain Lion - was cursive Chinese. So a thought occurred to me. Cut and paste the same ...


8

How long have you been practicing? At first it's normal. If you could see my first drawn characters... they didn't look good. But there are some simple rules to keep in mind to improve them. Stroke Order: It's unavoidable. You can actually use any stroke order you want, no-one is really going to check (unless that's the exam) but it's certain that writing ...


8

Generally putting XX is fine unless formal. People use that a lot orally. X is usually pronounced as 叉, but can vary based on region. Formally and also very commonly for missing name is using 某. 王某 (someone with surname 王 and one-character given name) 王某某 (someone with surname 王 and two-character given name) 某某/某某某 (very general, someone with unknown ...


8

Texts written for schoolchildren will be annotated with phonetic symbols. The last sentence indicates that this poster is made for schoolchildren: 如果發現了,趁著沒孵化之前通知老師來移除。 If any [eggs] are found, take the opportunity to let the teacher know, so that they can remove [the eggs] before they hatch.


7

If you're serious learner, or educated Chinese speaker, try learn brush writing. This video shows how it is possible to write it that beautiful. 永字八法 Eight Principles of 永 There're eight basic strokes to practice on: In Chinese: In English: In Japanese: How to grab the brush There're two major ways of holding the brush pen: 單鉤法 and 雙鉤法: 文房四寶 ...


7

Actually, if Twitter were to play fair, I think they would restrict Chinese users to 46 characters, since there are 3 bytes / UTF-8 encoded Chinese character, and only 1 byte / English letter. Alternately, in terms of number of bytes, the right comparison is probably between 140 characters of Chinese and 420 characters of English. Consider the differences ...


7

I was secretly expecting this question. :) In handwritten and calligraphic realization, these characters can be tough to distinguish, although the context will help you a lot. In printed text, the middle 横 héng stroke in 曰 is not touching the right side of the character, in 日 the middle stroke is entirely through, at least in most fonts. If not, it is only ...


7

The one I see most often is the use of "~": "啊~~~"


7

It is a similar pronunciation of Hokkien 感謝/感谢, so the meaning is to thank. The 臺灣閩南語常用詞辭典 shows that the pronunciation is kám-siā. It is a style of humor, not a joke. We use them a lot. Another example is 蝦米/虾米. It is the similar pronunciation of Hokkien 什麼/什么 (what). This one has been spread to China already.


7

To begin with, there is one thing called 大写 (daxie, “upper case”), in contrast to 小写 (xiaoxie, “lower case”). 小写:一二三四五六七八九十百千 - 元 大写:壹贰叁肆伍陆柒捌玖拾佰仟 - 圆 Daxie numbers are only used in finance in order to protect against falsification, because they contain too many strokes to modify. For example, 一 can be easily modified to 二 or 十, but 壹 cannot be ...


6

The Chinese have a device called 起承转合. First you start(起) narrating on some topic. Then you continue(承) to develop the topic with added material. Then you turn(转) the narrative, either by seeking different aspects, or creating conflicts and resolving them. Finally you conclude(合) the topic. Often it goes like this: (起) New study shows that spanking is bad ...


6

总而言之,complete version of 总之,less imperative. 综上所述,in summary (of the previous narration or evidences). 以上,very concise and confident way,but use it carefully,more of a meme these days


6

Dialect characters (方言字) exhibit great variation in the way they are written. The same character can have different meanings and even wildly different pronunciations between different varieties of Chinese, as they are not constricted by the regular developments from Middle Chinese. Even characters taken for granted in Standard Mandarin exhibit variation (e.g....


6

I had a student in Taiwan who was blind, so I've had a chance to work with this. There are articles on Chinese Braille in both the English and Chinese Wikipedias if you haven't read them yet. It is a spelling (phonetic) method, not character based. Blind Chinese students are not taught regular character forms. Braille in Taiwan is basically zhuyinfuhao; ...


6

Just adding this to the already answered question to point out a few pertinent things: (1) the question of whether the 月/⺝ as seen in e.g. 能青育 and so on is really 'the same' or 'different' can be answered on many levels; on some levels, those components are the 'same' (because they 'look the same'), on other levels, they are 'different' (because they ...


6

Use 破折号(dash), for example: 我们在天安门前深情的呼唤:周——总——理——


6

BabelStone wrote a Proposal to Encode Obsolete Simplified Chinese Characters which also contains a lot of history and other important information. Under the heading 2.2 we find: Table of First Batch Simplified Characters The table below lists all 324 first batch simplified characters in the order that they occur in the published table of simplifications. ...


6

If a person didn't know, or forgot how to write 餐 in 晚餐, he would not knowingly use a wrong word for substitute. The first thing he would do is to ask people who know. If there's no one to ask, he would substitute 晚餐 with a synonym that he did know is correct. For example '晚飯'. If he can't think of a synonym, he would use pinyin 'cān' inplace of the ...


6

So far, the earliest version of Tao Te Ching found is on the Guodian Chu Bamboo Slips, written in the Warring States era State of Chu. From 楚簡書法网 (http://www.cjsfw.net/Html/?287.html, http://www.cjsfw.net/Html/?283.html): The text is given in verses, beginning with an 8-character rhythm, and the punctuation marks are found on the bottom right of the ...


5

Practice writing characters, over and over again: The idea is to train your muscle memory to be able to write strokes in the right way - angles, shape, sizes. I don't think there is a silver bullet here; it's just practice, practice, practice. When I was young I did this using tracing paper over a template. Nowadays you can probably find apps for it.


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