Michaelyus
  • Member for 9 years, 10 months
  • Last seen this week
  • London, United Kingdom
Difference between alveolars and alveolo-palatals in Cantonese
6 votes

In essence, palatalisation of the alveolar fricative and affricate consonants occurs before front rounded vowels /y/, /œ/ and /ɵ/, with the effect strongest with /y/. It is weakly palatalised in front ...

View answer
Help to translate "红烧肉" to a foreigner
2 votes

The standard translation is "red cooked" in English; but this is not the most common way it is presented in overseas Chinese restaurants. Culinary terms (around the world) are known for being ...

View answer
Medieval Chinese Pronunciation
Accepted answer
5 votes

Middle Chinese starting from the Sui dynasty (with the Qièyùn, 切韻, published in 601 CE) actually documented its phonology. These are called rime tables, and break down each character pronunciation ...

View answer
Macau Cantonese, any differences from HK?
Accepted answer
8 votes

A quick browse on Google Scholar yields a few results. Macau Cantonese appears to be intermediate between Zhongshan Cantonese and Hong Kong Cantonese. There is only one rising tone derived from ...

View answer
How does inserting 起来 into 请客 as in 请起客来 changes the meaning?
7 votes

This infix -起-来 is usually considered a variation of the suffix -起来, and analysed as having an inceptive aspect, also called the inchoative aspect. The sense that it produces is "starting to do", "to ...

View answer
Cantonese sandhi
Accepted answer
9 votes

Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. ...

View answer
Hokkien `綴` vs. `共`: compare and contrast
4 votes

The word tuè/tè in Taiwanese Hokkien is used in contexts where 跟 in Mandarin more explicitly refers to the action of "following"; in the 台灣閩南語常用詞辭典 you can find the word kin-tuè/kun-tè, as written 跟綴. ...

View answer
Tones in Cantonese: 6 or 9?
Accepted answer
6 votes

From a practical learner's point of view, treating the checked "tones" as shorter, closed syllables that carry the same tone as as tones 1, 3, 6 (and 2 in changed tone) would be enough. In modern ...

View answer
Subjunctives in Chinese
Accepted answer
3 votes

I disagree with the translation into English of this use of the subjunctive. The structure May + [SUBJECT] + [VERB in infinitive form] in English generally implies a type of volitive subjunctive in ...

View answer
What are these tonal markings called?
Accepted answer
2 votes

This a well-known issue to do with the rendering of contour tones in certain computer fonts. The Wikipedia article for tone letter states that: The contour-tone letters are composed as sequences ...

View answer
Chinese [Topolectical] IPA Placeholder: Ẓ
Accepted answer
5 votes

It's quite clear that there is no difference between "Ẓ" and "ẓ" in the 1987 成都话方言词典 as you have shown. If you look at page 26 of the dictionary, you can see everything that starts with "ẓ" in the ...

View answer
Do 之 and 的 come from the same word?
Accepted answer
16 votes

的 in its function as a particle is attested in the 四大名著 Four Great Classical Novels, which are written in a vernacular Mandarin-type language, dating from the Ming dynasty. The particle use of 的 is ...

View answer
When can 把 be used?
2 votes

There are certain factors that motivate the use of the "disposal" form with 把 as the main verb (as opposed to the normal form). One of the biggest is with complements. If the complement could refer ...

View answer
What is the difference between using 光 vs using 只?
12 votes

只 is more limited in grammatical scope: it can only function as an adverb, preceding the verb. 光 has a larger range of related uses, from being a pre-verbal adverb (also called a restrictive adverb) ...

View answer
Are there online resources for learning the Chongqing dialect?
Accepted answer
7 votes

As a form of Southwestern Mandarin, you can approach the Chongqing dialect with resources designed for Sichuanese in general. The English Wikipedia gives a lot of resources on "Si4cuan1hua4", ...

View answer
Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
Accepted answer
8 votes

It's not just Cantonese. In Taiwanese Minnan (which does also preserve the labial final -m, usually), the finals of 法、凡、品 have also become alveolar. Also, most Hakka varieties have made the final of 品 ...

View answer
How to say "all the usual X" in Chinese?
3 votes

If you want to emphasise the 'all' (and so you want to keep the 都/全): The 'all' and 'the usual X' are normally treated separately [rather than both being stacked adjectives in English], and are ...

View answer
1 2 3
4