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8

You can find some bookstores near the Elementary Schools (小學). If you see some signs like 國小參考書, go to find 參考書 (references) or 評量題 (examinations) for the first or second grade (一、二年級). 參考書 include the teachings in the textbooks and some Q&A. 評量題 have only Q&A. You should know that all of them are totally in Chinese, no English. (Ask your ...


5

The title of the book is 《新編對相四言》明刻本.


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Although it looks like an idiom expression (chengyu), I believe it is actually a coined phrase, specifically for the TV adaptation of the Wuxia novel (射鵰英雄傳, 1983 TVB Hongkong) you mentioned. Literally, 鐵血丹心 can translate to "Iron blood scarlet heart". There is the connotation of the conflict between love and patriotism and such, but its a bit far fetched ...


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It reads: 早稻田 大學 圖書 A Japanese Waseda University collection.


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LingQ has a huge library of texts that generally also include audio. You can read any of the texts you like without paying for a subscription, as long as you don't want to add unknown words to your wordlist (creating LingQs). I have not paid for a subscription and find it to be very useful. If you do want to create a wordlist of the words you don't know for ...


4

Regarding starting with pinyin or characters: It's funny, I recently asked this question myself. In your case, I would recommend: Starting with basics of pinyin... getting the hang of pronunciation. TalkBank provides a pinyin chart that pronounces each for you given the selected tone. It's really cool. Just choose a tone, and click on a vowel/initial. Learn ...


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看圖學中文語法系列(2冊) 華語文能力測驗模擬試題2:入門基礎(Band A) 華語文能力測驗模擬試題3:入門基礎(Band A) Good luck!


3

I'm asking about answers based on scientific research or your experience. I choose experience to answer. In Taiwan, Students of lower grades of elementary school have a subject called 國語(in English: an official language used by our country). In Taiwan, people use Zhuyin to denote pronunciation. So textbook of 國語 have article written in Traditional ...


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There's a modern copywriting guide for Chinese: 中文文案排版指北 https://github.com/sparanoid/chinese-copywriting-guidelines


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I can recommend a book by 馮國超. My edition is from Taiwan and is simply called 成語故事, but the mainland edition is 中華成語故事, both from 2005 and in two volumes (with illustrations.) The Taiwan publisher is 代表作國際圖書. In this book, each chengyu has a separate page. There is a small box explaining the four characters, basically restating the saying in contemporary ...


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All, even higher "levels" of Graded Chinese Reader books come with pinyin. With a nice grid you can put over the page to cover pinyin (or characters) if you feel like it. https://www.purpleculture.net/graded-chinese-reader-bs-660/


2

If you don't mind, you might want Mandarin textbooks for lower grade elementary school used in China. And some storybooks also have Pinyin on every character. You might search jd.com or taobao.com to find some examples using keywords like "识字 拼音", "小学 课本". If you want get pinyin when reading on screen, you might try Lingoes Translator (offical website) ...


2

I would consider it practically impossible to learn how to pronounce words correctly in Chinese without audio. There's many obstacles: The initial x of 需 (xū) doesn't seem to have an equivalent sound in English. (Have you heard news reporters try to pronounce 习近平 (Xí Jìnpíng)?) The final u in 出 (chū) and 去 (qù) are pronounced differently (compare their ...


2

I haven't found the point about learning from one's mistakes but this is the closest Mao quote I've found: 中国监狱制度的改革与发展 “我们的监狱不是过去的监狱,我们的监狱其实是学校,也是工厂,或是农场。” Which roughly equates to something like: Our prisons are not prisons of the past, our prisons are actually schools, they are factories, or farms. Jean Pasqualini might have taken some liberties or ...


2

if the layout of the chinese characters is relevant to the meaning it's a no. the meaning of chinese text does not change, in relation to the style of "character flow". in text samples provided, the fifth one is the traditional style, used for several thousands of years. it should be read from top to bottom, from right to left. without punctuations, ...


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Speaking from experience, as long as you don't focus too much on the Pinyin (as in only reading the Pinyin) there shouldn't be any harm. The Pinyin is only supposed to familiarise you to the words, not to hinder you. That's why children's books and learners' textbooks have a lot of Pinyin. Once you've reached a certain amount of knowledge, you'll actually ...


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I suggest you try to get a sample of the books first and then decide which serves better your purpose. I think there are mainly two type of books: Type I: Simple learning descriptions They are focused mainly on Chinese learners, are less about etymologically accuracy and more about memorizing characters and stroke order with simple descriptions / stories. ...


1

it’s out of print. however, the hong kong public library has this book, i would suggest you find someone borrow one for copying or scanning, or, . . . 😼 https://webcat.hkpl.gov.hk/lib/item?id=chamo:2334580&fromLocationLink=false&theme=WEB have fun :)


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My experience is that I would inevitably read the pinyin and not the Chinese characters, and it's something I deliberately avoid. I also find pinyin inherently obstructive---once you've mastered HSK4, 90%+ of the pinyin is likely useless. There's also an argument to be made about deliberately making it difficult to find the pinyin: in order to learn, it's ...


1

I haven’t heard of this series before, but looking at information from the publisher (Peking University Press) and various booksellers I can see the following: 博雅汉语 = Boya Chinese (1st edition, published around 2004–2009) 初级起步篇I = Elementary starter I 初级起步篇II = Elementary starter II 准中级加速篇I = Pre-intermediate speed up I 准中级加速篇II = Pre-intermediate speed up ...


1

In Chinese, the number is syllables is quite important even in everyday speech; speakers tend to produce sentences with even numbers of syllables. As a result, I've often see them shorten two syllable words into one just to fit into that pattern, or skip some grammatical particles to conform to that format. That's not always observed, or even possible, but ...


1

It's an old book... I translate some basic info for you. Title: ILLUSTRATION OF GREAT ART TRADITION Publisher: Shanghai Publishing Co., Ltd (This company should not exist, but I haven't found the successor so far. The former location is at Room 701, Number 346 Middle Sichuan Road, Shanghai) Refer to this building -- 嘉陵大楼(Jialing Building )http://j.map.baidu....


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《江湖奇闻杜骗新书》(lit. Weird Things in the World: New Collection of Frauds) is written in a mixture of Classical and Vulgar Chinese. The Vulgar Chinese lately evolved into Modern Chinese in early 1920s (as the Government of ROC abolished all Classical Chinese textbooks in schools in 1922). Therefore, for a Chinese speaker above high school level, it is not a ...


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Here’s its website for your reference Materials: https://www.sc-top.org.tw/english/materials.php Also click “Mock Test” you will get online exercise and free pdf download. It’ll be interesting to learn traditional script. Once you reach a higher level, you will also start to understand simpfiled one without extra effort. Keep learning & Good luck


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I think the moderator hit the nail on the head here by pointing out that we want to help you to be able to find what you are looking for, which often comes down to having the right keywords, i found that 漢英對照 works rather well All of Jane Eyre (which is public domain) complete with English MP3's co.mes up along with others when searching google for the ...


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When I was at university there were books that had the English version alongside the Chinese version. This was either the complete Chinese text plus the complete English version or one page Chinese one page English. However, in my own experience these are not very common. Another option is to get something which you are familiar with and then buy the ...


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Kindle books in Chinese, and Clavis Sinica texts, already have pinyin and English available as electronic look-up. Both formats have a good variety of things already available. Furthermore, even a low-tech computer user like me can learn to make Kindle files, or Clavis Sinica files, from pretty much any Chinese text you find on-line. So you can use this ...


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There are thousands of chengyu, so I think we need to narrow down what you're using this for. If it's to employ in daily usage because you are learning Mandarin and want to come across as more authentic, I would recommend looking at HSK lists as those are likely to contain the most frequently used chengyu by the majority of Mandarin speakers. There are loads ...


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A really good site that I like: http://www.chinese-tools.com/chinese/chengyu Some of the chengyu are well detailed; others, less so. YMMV.


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