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I've often wondered how people decided on the pronunciation of characters. Apparently, huǒ + shī + cùn + rén or yí can equal yù Quite how this decision was reached is beyond me! 尉: Main pronunciation 主要发音: wèi Other pronunciations 其它发音: wèi,yù,yùn 示shì (actually a changed form of 火huǒ, I read) 尸shī 寸cùn 𡰥rén, yí 𡰥: 古文仁。或从尸。按古文夷亦如此。 We know that, in ...


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尉迟 rooted from vichy, same as in victoria


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The two syllables are related.「尉」(Baxter-Sagart OC: /*ʔut-s/) has two Mandarin descendants, which are approximately yu and wei. Several OC syllables with initial /*ʔu-/ basically evolved into Mandarin w and Mandarin yu; you can see the same phenomenon with the phonetic component「𥁕」: 溫 wēn 慍 yùn


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This is probably not the answer you're looking for, but both「秘」and「泌」underwent the same kinds of shifts (b > m) in certain topolects, so I would just treat it as a simple phonological shift within the labial consonant group (rather than something more "exciting"). I do not believe that the comments on it being a "Mandarin thing" are correct. Although "...


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