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I am hardly an expert on this topic. I know basically nothing about Cantonese-influenced Mandarin per se, but I'll offer an answer of the variety that I think hippietrail is looking for. Hopefully other people will be like "I now understand what a good answer to this question is supposed to look like, and furthermore, I know more than that idiot Stumpy Joe ...


7

maybe "大中華區". most multinational corporations used this term to describe the regions you mentioned. such usage is correct, in context of nowadays, or recent decades. historically, taiwan was integrated into the chinese empire after ~1683. before that time, formosa was colonised by the dutch, spanish. history of taiwan last, and most importantly is: how ...


5

鴛鴦 is actually the name of a bird; more specifically, the mandarin duck. Here's an image: (Look at how cute they are!) In Chinese culture, the mandarin duck is a symbol of lovers, much like the lovebird in English culture. The term 鸳鸯 is often used to describe pairs of things that make a good match. As for your drink, this most likely refers to the ...


5

《懶蟲簡明英漢詞典》 go Dutch verb 各人付自己的帳 Usually, we simply say 各付各的 or 各出各的 in both TC and SC. Others: 各付各的帳 各付一半帳 各付一半賬 各付帳 各人付自己的帳 各人自付錢 各人自己付錢 各自付錢 各自付帳 各自負擔自己費用 According to the legend of the Anglo-Dutch scramble for colonies and competition for the international trade market, because of the frequent conflict ...


4

Many people in Hong Kong use Quick aka 速成 or Simplified Cangjie. There is a wiki link for this input method:Simplified Cangjie There is a build-in Quick IME in Windows and Mac. Most of the Quick users use it. Quick users type Chinese using Quick on smartphone too, as the build-in IME of smartphone that selling in Hong Kong usually support Quick. However, ...


4

A few suggestions for you: 恭喜發財 gung1 hei2 faat3 choi4 新年快樂 san1 nin4 faai3 lok6 -- All purpose happy new year. 身體健康 san1 tai2 gin6 hong1 龍馬精神 lung4 ma2 jing1 san4 -- Mostly for older people (and health-conscious people), wishing them good health. 快高長大 faai3 gou1 jeung2 daai6 學業進步 hok6 yip6 jeun3 bou6 -- For children and students respectively, ...


4

In Hong Kong, the two most popular greetings in Cantonese are 恭喜發財 新年快樂 I am not sure about other Cantonese-speaking areas.


4

香江 ABC Canto: PLACE WORD another name for Hong Kong; refers to especially to Victoria Harbor which resembles a river separating Hong Kong Island from the Kowloon Peninsula 是次畫展於香江舉辦 si6 ci3 waa2 zin2 jyu1 hoeng1 gong1 geoi2 baan6 This time the exhibition of paintings is held in Hong Kong Notes: elegant See also 本港 bun2 gong2 香港地 ...


4

东方之珠 (Pearl of the Orient) is a common alias (nickname) for 香港. 香港是全球重要的国际金融、服务业及航运中心,连续多年蝉联全球最自由经济体,并以优良治安、廉洁社会、简单税制和健全的法律制度而闻名于世,因此有“东方之珠”的美誉。


3

Cantonese and Chinese new year greetings are actually written the same. The only difference is about the accent. Here are some of the most popular new year greetings. 心想事成 (xīn xiǎnɡ shì chénɡ) - Whatever you dream of comes true. 万事如意 (wàn shì rú yì) - Everything goes your way. 六六大顺 (liù liù dà shùn) - Everything goes smoothly. 年年有余 (nián nián yǒu yú) - May ...


3

In your situation, the most colloquial and natural expression that I can think of is "我嚟得就嚟” (If I can come, I will.) The speaker is not committing, nor is s/he ruling out coming. Another expression closer to "don't count on me/ don't rely on me (to do something, not necessarily joining the speaker for lunch)" is "唔好旨意嗮我。”


3

"咪俾個價錢掃你興啦!" 咪 = 唔好 = Don't 俾 = allow / let "個" .... It sounds more natural with this quantifier 價錢 = price 掃你興 ~= 減低你嘅樂趣 ~= 影響你嘅樂趣 = interfere with your happiness "啦" .... It sounds more natural with this interjection


3

I think 另有內情 ling6 jau5 noi6 cing4 fits the bill.


3

I presume that you mean "Don't count me in.". In this case, you can say, "唔使預我" "使" here is pronounced as "sai2" (i.e., same as 洗) 唔使 = don't / no need 預我 = expect (/ prepare for) my presence Edit: If it is possible that B will or will not go, we usually say "我未必來到", where "來" is pronounced as lai4 (黎) and "到" is pronounced as dou2 (倒). Edit2: A bit old-...


3

凡事都有兩面。 There are always two sides to every story. 凡 = every 事 = issue (story) 都 = always 有 = has 兩 = two 面 = sides


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I try to answer for the mainland China part. And I only mention Pinyin IME here because that's what I and the majority use. Windows: IMHO, the best Pinyin IME on Windows is Sogou Pinyin regarding match rate. As you might already know, Pinyin are not 1-to-1. Sogou Pinyin has the highest match rate of all IMEs I've used. I recommend you to try it if you're ...


3

I am working on some tiny SMT project at the moment and I was looking for this too, the only one I could find is this word list from this corpus of mid-20th century Hong Kong Cantonese, It might not be great if you are using them for learning Chinese, as it's mid-20 century's.


3

In Cantonese grammar, 緊 indicates a ‘progressive’ aspect while 住 indicates a ‘durative’ aspect. Both aspects are part of the ‘continuous’ aspect of English grammar. 佢著緊件外套 (she is putting on an overcoat) describes a dynamic ongoing action of wearing the overcoat. 佢著住件外套 (she has on her body an overcoat) describes a static persistent state of already having ...


2

Here is one ::::::::::::::广东话常用语对照表 http://www.360doc.com/content/11/0228/19/4410155_96958044.shtml


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Is my understanding correct that the "official" Chinese language is the Mandarin? Yup. In other words, if someone studies Chinese as a foreign language, is he taught the Chinese Mandarin? Depends on your definition of "study". (I'll come back to this in a second) Moreover, are the languages spoken by people living in non-Mandarin areas of the ...


2

From my experience, the talk between people living in non-Mandarin areas usually use their local dialects, which are very hard to understand for people only know Mandarin. But When they talk to the people from Mandarin areas, they also can speek Mandarin. Especially the young people can speek Mandarin because the Chinese class were taught by the official ...


2

In Cantonese, N and L are often mutually mixable. For example, nian2 年 could be like nien or lien. So when a Canto speakers tries to say it, it could be like nlian2. Another classic example is 你 which may be nei or lei. Even more classic is when someone is from 湖南 and we hear they are from 荷兰 but perhaps linguistically HuNan Hua and Canto are similar ...


2

I'll just dump words, and put all data at the end to support my claims as much as I can. Mainland The most common input editor by far on the mainland is pinyin input. Sougou, Windows or Mac's native IME, google's IME (which had an incident of plagiarizing sougou's database), QQ Pinyin, Baidu pinyin etc. For people not satisfied by regular Quanyin (whole) ...


2

Not a Cantonese word per se, but you can use the good old 兼听则明, which means "Listening to both sides of a story makes Jack a bright boy." A complete form would be 兼听则明, 偏信则暗. The latter part means "Believing only one side of a story makes Jack a dumb git."


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I think 凡事都有两面性 is okay. 凡事=任何事=everything. 任何事物都应该从正反两面考虑。有其利,必有其弊。


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I don't think there is a Cantonese phrase equivalent to it. Usually we just use a sentence like "唔好咁快下结论" to express the idea of "Don't make a snap judgement".


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You can also turn Mandarin lists (of characters) into Cantonese aids by using CantoFish for Firefox. It will also give you Pinyun / Jyutping for the 360 doc mentioned above. Also, using the characters you can check forvo for audio files. I have two article that can help out: 1) 7 tips for learning Cantonese Fast 2) The most common words in Cantonese - ...


2

Try the following websites: http://www.cantonese.asia/attachments/school/canchars.htm http://www.chinapage.com/language/suyu/gdfy/gdfymain.html and cross-check the results with the ancient meaning of the characters by: http://www.zdic.net/


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