8

Here's a good English definition and explanation with an example sentence to get you started: A Students Dictionary of Classical and Medieval Chinese 2 negative particle of the perfective: had not, have not, will have not; similar to 末 mò and often accompanied by perfective-final 矣 yǐ; mostly found in Zuozhuan 左傳 and Guoyu 國語, later mainly for archaic ...


7

This is a knottier question than it first appears. The answer is hard to summarise, but it seems to be related to the special status of 有 and 無 from the beginning of Chinese. In the Old Chinese of the oracle bones, there seems to be fairly neat system of four. 不, 弗, 毋, 勿, where each of these is a combination of p-type vs m-type, reflecting non-modal (...


7

"你找到你爸爸了没" It's short for "你找到你爸爸了没有?" or "你找到你爸爸了还是没有找到?". The complete sentence should be "do you find your father, or not?". "没" here is similar as "or not" in English. BTW. The "你" before "爸爸" is redundant in Chinese. "你找到爸爸了没" is correct. It is impacted by translation from western language. Even many Chinese make this kind of mistake too.


7

也 means even 你也配? (even you are worthy?) is a rhetorical question, it is in fact, a statement for "你不配" (you are not worthy) (the standard hasn't sunk so low that even people like you are worthy/ qualified) 你配嗎? (are you worthy/qualified?) is another way to ask this rhetorical question. It too means "你不配" (you are not worthy) More ...


6

Any of these sentences would be grammatically correct. However 我要一份青椒肚片不要(加)大蒜 would be a better and more common usage in my opinion. It would be even better to include the character in the parenthesis, 加 which means "add" or "with" or "include".


5

Yes, adding the 没 at the end makes it a question. In this case, it is equivalent to "你找到你爸爸了吗?" Without the 没, it would be "You found your dad". With the 没 makes it "Have you found your dad?". It's kind of a shortened version of something like "Have you or haven't you found your dad?" (你有没有找到你爸爸?)(This is where the 没 comes from) 你找不找到你爸爸了 doesn't really ...


5

The opposite of "他没看书" (he did not/has not read books) is "他有看书" (he did/ has read books)- 没(has not) here replaces the adverb 有(has)- to indicate 'absent' of the action The opposite of "他不看书" (he does not read) is "他看书" (he does read)- 不 here modifies the verb 看书 (read) into its negative form 不看书 (does not read) - to ...


4

I am a bit confused by the 在 in your example sentence, since you don't need it there, 我不在8点起床,我(在?)9点起床。 Frankly, I wouldn't know what this sentence was supposed to mean, if you hadn't provided a translation. If you want to express that something occures at a certain time of the day, e.g. X o'clock, there is no need for 在, just use X点 or X点钟. As for the ...


4

Good question. 不满 is a single word. It means unhappy or unsatisfied. It cannot be separated into 不 + 十分 + 满. It's like you can't say "un-very-happy". 不满意 is a phrase, 不 + 满意 = not satisfied. It can be modified by 十分: 不 + 十分 + 满意。


4

if you are speaking Cantonese, you can use 我要一份青椒肚片‘走’蒜。 in English it's something like take it off.


3

a. 你不配。 b. 你也配? c. 你也配! All of the above express the same meaning: you are not qualified (for something or to do something). Of course sentence a. is the most straightforward option. I'd say sentences b. and c. are rhetorical (hence the lack of negation), with sentence c. being much stronger than b., bordering on irony. We should not look at sentence c. as ...


2

Put it in simple words: 不 means "not" while 别 means "don't do something", it is also good to compare them with another negation word:没有, which literally means lack of the action:having, so in other words it means don't have or doesn't have. Don't forget in Chinese we don't conjugate the verbs.


2

没 and 不 are fundamentally different. 没 means "didn't" 不 means "won't" or "don't" Actually your two sentences are perfectly normal Chinese sentences: 我没喝 means I didn't drink (it) -or- I haven't drank 我不喝 means I don't want to drink -or- I won't drink A Chinese English Dictionary 没 ADVERB INFORMAL have not or did not 他来没来?——还没来呢。 Tā ...


2

According to my book New practical Chinese HSK5 what I understood. 十分不满 or 十分不满意=fully not satisfied Not satisfied at all In the other hand 不十分满意=not fully satisfied


2

As far as I can tell, the question does not require you to leave the 能 in the sentence. Since the 能 is already implied by the 可能补语 structure, the most natural way to solve your problem would be to leave off the 能: 你拿得来那本书吗? 我拿不来那本书。 By the way, to me it sounds more natural to move the object to the start of the sentence: 那本书你拿得来吗? 那本书我拿不来。 ... but it's ...


2

That is really a good question. For English, it could use "not" in both two situations. In my own opinion, you should get contextual analysis. A is asking David's activity, so the correct answer is 他没(在)看书. If inquire David's interests or habits, then the answer is 他不(喜欢)看书。 Hope it is clear.


2

I think it's actually 了没 that works together, instead of the single character 没. 了没 can be interpreted as Have ... yet?. It works in the structure "verb + 了没". For example, 你吃了没(Have you eat yet?),你去了没(Have you gone there yet) ... Sometimes, we can omit 了. E.g. 看没?= 看了没?, 说没?= 说了没? It's pretty common. It can probably work for any verbs.


2

他十分不满 He is very unsatisfied. 他不十分满 He is not very ...full? The problem is the usage of 满. 不满=unsatisfied 满意=satisfied But only 满 usually means full/completed/filled so 他不十分满 is wrong, how could a man get filled? (perhaps beer?) 他不十分满意 is OK, meaning He is not very satisfied


2

我對明星一點興趣都不感 Your problem is not that verb itself, but the word order. The correct order is: 我對明星一點 都不感興趣. Hope this could help you.


2

Our moderator @songyuanyao has already provided a good link, here I make some additions: 没 is the opposite of 有, which implys the objective absence, while 不 is mere negation. Is 不有 valid? Yes! But it appears in classical Chinese, and idioms originating from it. 有 means 占有(seize), so it can be simply negated by 不: 生而不(有),为而不恃,功成而弗居。——《老子》 “创生而不去占有,...


2

the second has two verb. 會見and 不見(or maybe the sentence just ignore the conjunction.this is not formal)。 Here is correct grammar 你下个星期天见不见你的孩子 just take 会 away and the sentence will be perfect and have the same meaning as the former sentence. or add conjunction 你下个星期天见或是不见你的孩子 And can these both sentences be equally written as 你下个星期天会见你的孩子吗?yes


2

門口不像日本有隔出玄關範圍的高低差 Some object is omitted (這)[門口] [不像日本(的門口)(那樣)] [有] [隔出玄關範圍的][高低差] (This)[door], [unlike Japan('s doors) (which)] [have] [that separate the entrance area ][height difference] This door, unlike Japanese doors which have a height difference that separates the entrance area It implies 這門口沒有高低差 (this door has no height difference) Break ...


2

Tl;dr: because of the inferential nature of the construction 不像⋯⋯有, the phrase that expresses the idea of unlikeness is essential to understanding. A syntactically loyal (but less idiomatic in English) translation is The entrance (in Taiwan) is unlike Japan's having a step for separating an area for the entryway. So it is better to consider 日本有隔出玄關範圍的高低差 ...


2

The dialogue would make better understanding if a question mark is included, as, 你也配?, which actually questions someone's "qualification or worthiness" rather than affirming it. Saying, 你也配? ( "You are qualified / worthy"?) rather than, say, "你配吗"?, ("Are you qualified / worthy"?) which unmistakably questions the ...


2

In here, 也 means "too", or "also". For example - 那些人都是英雄. (你算老幾,) 你也配!? "All those people are heroes. Who the hell you are that thinking of yourself qualifies as one too!?" 你也配 is a frequently used phrase when one wants to show contempt for somebody's qualification/capability to be a character of high quality through a negative ...


1

I feel the main issue is covered in a Yoyo Chinese YouTube video (starting around 1:20); they use the two-verb example: 你会说中文。 你会不会说中文? The Yoyo Chinese video describes this as "focusing on the main verb --> usually the first verb". So... Correct: 你下个星期天会不会见你的孩子? Incorrect: 你下个星期天会见不见你的孩子? And... Correct: 你下个星期天会见你的孩子吗? Additional ...


1

没 denotes the sense of non-existence, while 不 is a general negation. The other way to think of it is that 没 is the short version of 没有. In other words, you can replace 没 with 没有 when 没 precedes a verb. For example, 他没来=他没有来; 门没关=门没有关;etc. 不 is used with other words(except for 有) such as 是 to form the negation. E.g. 这不是我做的; 我不管; 我不说;etc. Furthermore, ...


1

This is typical Southern Chinese. 没 means 没有, and at the end of a sentence, short for 还是没有. 你找到你爸爸了没? = 你找到了你爸爸还是没有? = Have you found your dad, or not? In Northern Chinese, it should be: 你找到你爸爸了吗? = Have you found your dad?


1

You can say "它以前不是红色的". But it can imply somehow "它现在是红色的"。


1

How do you specify past tense for 是? From my answer: You have to remember, unlike in English, we do not have past tense for verbs in Chinese grammar. Both "is" and "was" is written as "是" in Chinese.


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